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Full text of "Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine 1966"

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

BALTIMORE 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bulletinofuniver5151 



BULLETIN 

School of Medicine 
University of Maryland 



Volume 51, 1966 



)> 



xH 



HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

PA' TIMORF 



i~>l-D^2^ 



Abdullah. J.. M.B.. page 43 

Anccs, Isadorc C, M.D.. page 17 

Benign Localized Fibrous Mesothelioma 
of Pleura, page 2 1 

Bereston. Eugene S.. M.D.. page 53 

Book Reviews: 

A University is Born by Margaret 
Byrnside Ballard, M.D. Reviewed 
by John E. Sa\age. M.D.. page 59 

Basic Gcisiro-Enteroloi>y by J. M. Naish 
and A. E. Read. Reviewed by J. W. 
Eckholdt. M.D.. page 58 

Conlroversy in Internal Medicine edited 
by Franz J. Ingelfinger, M.D., 
Arnold S. Reiman, M.D., and Max- 
well Finland. M.D., page 58 

Diseases of the Newborn by Alexander 
J. Schaffer. M.D.. and Milton Mar- 
kowitz. M.D. Reviewed by Donald 
E. Knickerbocker, M.D., page 34 

Ferment in Medicine. A Study of the 
Essence of Medical Practice and of 
Its New Dilemmas by Richard M. 
Magraw, M.D., and Daniel B. 
Magraw. M.B.A. Reviewed by 
Mitchell J. Rosenholtz. M.D.. page 
60 

Gonadotropins: Physiochemical and 
Immunologic Properties edited by 
G. E. W. Wolstenholme and Julia 
Knight. Reviewed by Arthur L. 
Haskins. M.D.. page 58 

Obstetrics by J. P. Greenhill. Reviewed 
by Norman Levin, page 33 

Chloramphenicol Treatment of Pyogenic 
Meningitis, page 43 

Chromosomal Mosaicism in Gonadal Dys- 
genesis — Report of a Case, pages 12, 

28 

Clark. Howard, page 3 

Correlative Study of Chronic Arterial 
Hypertension and Pregnancy, page 17 



Volume .")1. 19()6 

Cowley. R. A.. M.D.. page 36 



Dialung Artificial Kidney — A Compact. 
Pumpless, Low Cost, Hand Portable, 
Clinical Hemodialysis System, page 3 

Esmond. William G.. M.D., page 3 

Ferris, C. D., D.Sc, page 36 

Frequency and Power Considerations in 
the Use of Alternating Current Defibril- 
lators, page 36 

Gallager. L. R.. M.D.. page 43 

Glick, Samuel S., page 53 

Haskins, Arthur, M.D., page 17 

Hassan, S., M.B., page 43 

Hornick. R. B., M.D., page 43 

Khan. I.. M.B.. page 43 

Khan. M. A., M.B., page 43 

Lewitinn, Albert, page 3 

Messer, J., Ph.D.. page 43 

Millett. Joseph, M.D., page 21 

Moore, Sarah, page 3 

Moore, T. W., M.S., page 36 

Moszkowski, Erica F.. M.D., pages 12, 28 

Robinson. Harry M., Jr., M.D., page 39 

Ronald. A. R., M.D., page 43 

Shafti. M. J.. M.B., page 43 

Strauch, Manfred, M.D., page 3 

Taubert, Hans-Dieter, M.D., pages 12, 28 

Tolnaftate, Specific Antifungal Agent, 
page 39 

Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, Report of a 
Case, page 53 

Woodward, T. £., M.D.. page 43 

Zaheer Ud-Din. M.B., page 43 



October. 1966 



.xliii 



BULLETIN School of Medicine 
UnwersUtj of Mar/jJond 

VOLUME 51 JANUARY, 1966 NUMBER 1 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



ORIGINAL ARTICLES 

The Dialung Artificial Kidney — A Compoct, Pumpless, Low Cost, 

Hand Portoble, Clinical Hemodialysis System 

William G. Esmond, M.D., et.al. 

Chromosomal Mosaicism in Gonadal Dysgenesis — Report of a Case- 
Hans-Dicler Taubert, M.D., Erica F. Moszkowski, M.D. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



Dean's Letter 



Reorganization of School Administrotio 

Dr. Bradley Retires os Pediatric Head 

Faculty Notes 



Los Amigos de Cajol Dedicate Memorial Bust at Petlllo 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 

President's Letter 



Treasurer's Report of the Medical Alumni Association xii 

Abstract of Minutes of Boord of Directors Xiii 

U. of M. Alumni At Annual Meeting, Southern Medical Association XV 

Alumni Day, May 6, 1966 _ Xvi 

Anniversary Reunion Class Captains xviii 

Closs Of 1916 — 50th Anniversary Xviii 

Class Of 1921 — 45th Anniversary xix 

Class Of 1926 — 40th Anniversary XX 

Class OF 1931 — 35th Anniversary xxi 

Class Of 1936 — 30th Anniversary xxii 

Class Of 1941 — 25th Anniversary . xxiv 

Class Of 1946 — 20th Anniversary xxvii 

Class Of 1951 — 15th Anniversary xxix 

Class Of 1956 — 10th Anniversary xxxi 

Class Of 1961 — 5th Anniversary xxxiv 

Roster of Senior Alumni xxxvi 

January, 1966 



Medical education needs your dollar! 
to stay strong and free . . . 




Give to tlie 
school of your clioice 
tlirougli AMEF 



To train the doctors of tomorrow, 
the nation's medical schools must 
your help today. It is a physician's i 
privilege and responsibility to repl 
his own ranks with men educated 
to the highest possible standards. 
Invest in the future health of the natio 
your profession. Send your check toe 



American Medical Education Foundation ( P 

lAMEF 



535 North Dearborn 
Chicago 10, Illinois 



BULLETIN School of Medicine 
Universitij of Maryland 



VOLUME 51 



JANUARY, 1966 



NUMBER 1 



The Dialung Artificial Kidney -A Compact, 
Piiinpless, Low Cost, Hand Portable, Clinical 
Hemodialysis System 

WILLIAM G. ESMOND, M.D., MANFRED STRAUCH, M.D., HOWARD CLARK, 
ALBERT LEWITINN, SARAH MOORE 



A NUMBER of successful artificial 
kidney systems^ have been produced and 
are being employed clinically.^' 3, 4, 6, 6 
Some systems require pumps^ for both 
blood and dialysis solution and others 
have been designed for low flow resistance 
and can be used without pumps. ^' ^- ^ 
All systems designed to date are expensive 
to purchase and to operate. Since the con- 
vincing demonstrations of E>r. Belding 
Scribner that maintainance of life in 
chronic renal failure is possible with 
hemodialysis carried out two or three 
times a weekj' ^- s. lo the fundamental 
problem to be solved has been the tre- 
mendous cost required to maintain a 
patient in reasonably good health by this 
technique. This cost which was initially 
approximately $20,000 per patient per 
year has been progressively lowered until 
at the present time is about $5,000 to 
$7,500 per year per patient. Funda- 



From departments of medicine and surgery 
(Division of Thoracic Surgery), University of 
Maryland School of Medicine, Redwood and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Supported principally by N.I.H. grant HE- 
02618-01-09 and in part by a grant from the 
Surgeon General, U. S. Army DA 49-193-MD- 
2229. 



mentally, the primary engineering prob- 
lem to be solved in hemodialysis is to de- 
sign a system which will produce the 
greatest mass transfer of waste products 
from a patient's blood to the dialysis bath 
for the least monetary expense including 
all factors. The optimum artificial kidney 
system designed for this purpose will have 
the following design parameters ^^^ 

1 . Low flow resistance so that a maxi- 
mum of available blood flow may occur 
through the device by blood pressure 
alone. 

2. Low priming volimie which is as 
constant as possible to avoid the need for 
priming blood. All but a few drops of 
blood should be recoverable from the 
device at the termination of hemodialysis. 

3. Ultra filtration should be possible 
if desired. 

4. The flow distribution of blood and 
rinsing solution should be equalized so 
that all areas of the dialysis membrane 
work efficiently and no shimting should 
occur. 

5. Mass transfer should be maximized 
by controlling fluid film boundary layers 
and by using a sufficient surface area of 
the most permeable membrane attainable. 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



6. The device should possess smooth 
non-toxic surfaces and be biochemically 
compatible with blood. Red cell hemoly- 
sis, and white cell and platelet destruction 
should be as low as possible. 

7. The device should be constructed 
of low cost parts and be disposable or be 
easily recleaned and autoclaved. 

8. Various sizes of the device should 
be available for infant, pediatric and 
adult use. 

9. The device should be steam auto- 
clavable or be sterilizable with ethylene 
oxide gas. 

10. The device should be safe in 
operation and be leak free in use after 
suitable assembly tests. 

1 1 . The auxiliary apparatus used with 
the dialyzer should be simple, inexpensive 
and easily maintained. 

12. The system should be so simple 
and safe that it may be monitored by 
the patient himself or by a member of the 
family. 

The optimization of any design is 
usually a continuing process and often 
lags due to the non-availability of essential 

1 '\ r f 



*»<-. 







t^sffi^ 



Fie. 



[. standard one square meter 65 plats Dialane. 
Aoministration sets and prepunched Bemberg PT 
150 cuprophane membranes are shown in the fore- 
ground. The 4 long alignment pins and 8 long 
clamping studs are used in the rare event that a 2 
square meter dialyzer may be required for a difficulty 
dializable toxin. 



materials only to surge ahead after an 
advance in technology occurs in another 
field making new materials or techniques 
available. The Dialung artificial kidney 
(Figure 1) was originally designed by the 
author in 1956 as a multiple, parallel 
path, pumpless, autoclavable hemodia- 
lyzer. Initial models made in 1957 with 
Nylon injection molded plates (Figure 2) 




Fig. 2. Original design Dialung plate. Eight mani- 
fold channels are provided to allow both cross flow 
and counter current flow stacking. Only 4 mani- 
folds arc used at 1 time. The 2 dual fluid admittance 
and discharge ports, clear internal distribution chan- 
nels and the 84 dialysis grid grooves on each side 
of the 12.5 X 12.5 mm. central area for dialysis 
are shown. The original materia! was Nylon and 
was later changed to polypropylene. 

functioned well but were difiicult to 
sterilize by autoclaving without excessive 
distortion. The Nylon plates could be 
used only one time. The advent of auto- 
clavable polypropylene plastic and a re- 
design of the molded plate (Figure 3) to 
confer greater dimensional stabiUty re- 
sulted in a multi-parallel plate hemodia- 
lyzer (Dialung) with efficient function 
meeting the foregoing design para- 
meters. i^ 

The basic inexpensive Dialung plate 
is precision injection molded in polypropy- 
lene plastic and possesses a glossy smooth 
surface completely compatible with blood. 
The plates measure 1.6 mm. thick and 
are 203 mm. square. Eight circular fluid 



Vol. 51. No. 1 



ESMOND, STRAUCH, CLARK. LEIVITINN. MOORE— DIALUNG 




Fig:. 3. The redesigned Dialan? plate is pi 
The slot type manifolds have been eliminati 
appear as circular holes in 8 "ears" on the < 
of the plate. This plate molded in polypropyle 
been found to be dimensionally stable in 
use usinff steam autoclave sterilization. 



manifolds are present on the edges of 
the plate. One manifold is used to intro- 
duce (heparinized) blood and one to 
drain dialyzed blood. Blood descends in 
the entrance manifold and passes into 
each blood plate through two pairs of 
small metering ports 0.8 mm. square and 
6 mm. in length. The blood then flows 
in a clear distribution groove the length 
of the plate and crosses both sides of 
the central grid of the plates in 84 grooves 
to a second collecting channel and then 
flows to a second dual pair of metering 
ports which allows the blood to leave 
the plate into a discharge manifold where 
it flows out of the bottom of the kidney. 
In use, the blood plates are alternated 
with Bemberg PT 150 cuprophane cellu- 



PUHIFIEO BLOOD OUT DIALYSIS FLUID IN 




DIALYSIS FLUID IN 



u-t- ♦. 



WASTE a DIALYSIS FLUID OUT 



Fie- 4. Counter carrent Dialnns stacking patte 
January, 1966 



nd pampless simple arrangement for hemodialysis. 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CROSS FLOW DIALUN6 

ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM 




MEMBRANE 



CLAMPING 
PLATE 



RINSING BLOOD BLOOD RINSING 
SOL IN IN OUT SOL OUT 

Fig. 5. Cross flow Dialung stacking pattern. 

lose membranes and dialysis solution 
rinsing fluid plates in either a counter 
current flow pattern (Figure 4) or in a 
cross flow path pattern (Figure 5). The 
plates are clamped securely between 
1.4 X 20.5 X 20.5 cm. electropolished 
stainless steel clamping plates which pro- 
vide an effective sealing pressure by 
means of eight stainless steel studs, 
washers, and nuts. The device is leak- 
proof and will withstand a pressure test 
of 2,600 mm. Hg. with duPont PD 250 
cellophane membranes and 1,000 mm. 
Hg. with Bemberg PT 150 cuprophane 
membranes. The priming volume for a 
one square meter surface area Dialung 



having 65 plates and 66 membranes is 
200 ml. for the blood compartment and 
200 ml. for the dialysis fluid compartment 
so that no blood need be used in prim- 
ing. At the termination of hemodialysis 
practically all blood can be drained back 
to the patient. Blood flow resistance is 
quite low and in a standard one square 
meter dialyzer, a blood pressure of 70 
mm. Hg. at the inlet of the device will 
cause a blood flow of 200 ml. per minute. 
Blood flows without a pump, in clinical 
practice, have ranged from 90 ml. /minute 
to 500 ml. per minute. Hemolysis has 
not been detectable in clinical use. An 
ultra filtrate of 100 ml. /hour can be ob- 
tained with one square meter of Bemberg 
PT 150 cuprophane membranes for each 
100 mm. Hg. pressure difference. Ultra 
filtration can be greatly enhanced by rais- 
ing glucose concentration in the dialysis 
bath to 1,000-1,200 mg.% 

The modular construction employed in 
the Dialung allows the clinician to as- 
semble a small dialyzer for infants (0.24 
M^) or larger dialyzers for children (0.48 




Vol. 51. No. 1 



ESMOND, STRAUCH. CLARK, LFJVITINN. MOORE— DIALUNG 




Fig. 7. Lightweigrht portable version of the Dialnng d 
dialyzer with potential applications in home hemodialysi 
practice. Light weight, low cost, injection molded ) 
the stainless steel plates shown. Tube fittings are lo 
cost and further simplify use. A one gallon hemodial 
diluted with 35 parts of water to make up a 128 liter 
a collapsible 150 liter canvas dialysis tank (not sho 

than 50 

M2) or adults (1 M^) (Figure 6). A 
lightweight, "disposable" model of the 
Dialung constructed for potential appli- 
cation in military medicine is shown in 
Figure 7. Molds for lightweight, glass 
filled Lexan clamping plates which will 
lower the weight and cost of the dis- 
posable version of the Dialung are now 
being constructed. 

Flow distribution is optimized in the 
Dialung by a member of procedures. 
Blood is caused to enter the top of the 
unit and discharges from the opposite 
side of the bottom of the unit. In ad- 
dition, the blood (or fluid) ports of each 



veloped as a simplified, pressembled, one use, disposable 
and in military hemodialysis as well as in hospital 
lass filled rigid Lexan clamping plates will soon replace 
w cost, press in, injection molded Nylon which decrease 
rsis fluid concentrate is shown which can be quickly 
hemodialysis bath. All components shown including 
n-n) can be packed in a small suitcase weighing less 
pounds. 

plate are arranged on opposite comers 
to equalize resistance. In general, it has 
been found that cross flow stacking re- 
sults in an exact fixed even resistance 
geometry whereas the counter current 
stacking arrangement with parallel plates^^ 
allows some variable "nesting" of the 
grids to occur in each other resulting 
in some uneven flow patterns. We have 
advised all users of the present model 
Dialung to employ cross flow stacking. 
Recent mathematical studies have indi- 
cated no real theoretical advantage in 
counter current flow as was previously 
believed. 11 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



250r 



UREA DIALYSANCE 



CREATININE DIALYSANCE 




--DUPONT PD-215 

eEMBERG PT-150 

SSPONIFIED CELLULOSE 

aCETJTE 



100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 
IMULATED BLOOD FLOW RATE cc/MINUTE 



Fig. 6. In vitro urea dialysance carves of a 2 
square meter Dialung. Chemically modified cellulose 
acetate dialysis membranes offer great promise of 
producing more permeable kidney membranes and 
are the subject of additional research. 



250 


CHLORIDE DIALYSANCE 


200 


^^---:_... 


150 


x:^-'''- 


100 


//''•'' DUPONT PD-215 




A*''' BEM8EBG PT-150 


50 


AV SJPONIFIED CELLULOSE 

" ^/ (SCET/ITE 

L. 1 1 1 1 1. ] 1 1 



100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 
SIMULATED BLOOD FLOW RATE cc/MINUTE 



In vitro studies indicate excellent clear- 
ance of urea, creainine, and chlorides 
(Figures 8, 9, 10). These figures indi- 
cate performance using the highest bath 
flow rates attainable. Clinical usage re- 
sults in lower bath flow rates by simple 
syphon from an elevated plastic tank in 
a one pass pumpless flow to drain" of 
from 500 to 1,500 ml./min. and dialys- 
ance figures are slightly reduced by this 
lower bath flow rate. Data obtained in 
clinical dialyses for a one square meter 
Dialung have indicated a clearance 
for urea of from 60-75 ml./min. and 
from 35-45 ml. of creatinine per minute. 
These figures are limited of course by the 




DUPONT PD-215 

BEMBERG PT-150 

S4P0NIFIED CELLULOSE 



100 200 300 400 500 600 700 
SIMULATED BLOOD FLOW RATE Cc/MINU 



volume of blood obtainable from the 
small forearm arteries of patients in a 
pumpless system. The equipment used 
to mix and heat dialysis solution is shown 
in Figure 11. 




Fie. 11. 400 liter stainless steel dialysis solution 
concentrate preparation tank for tlie Dialung. The 
inexpensive 200 liter polyethylene plastic tank may 
be used with prepared dialysis solution concentrate 
and city water to provide an inexpensive supply of 
dialysis rinsing solution in a pumpless one pass flow 
through the Dialung to the drain. 

In order to obtain the optimum mem- 
brane for the hemodialyzer, a rotating 
cell was designed in which 50 ml. of 
saline and 50 ml. of water can be placed 
on each side of each vertically mounted 
test membrane (Figure 12). The cell was 
then rotated at 180 r.p.m. effectively 
scouring the membrane and practically 
eliminating the usual stagnant fluid film 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ESMOND, STRAUCH. CLARK, LEWITINN. MOORE— DIALUNG 




Fig. 12. Dual chamber rotating dialysis test cell with vertical membrane support. 



boundary at the interface. Periodic 
chloride analyses in the Buchler-Cotlove 
chloridimeter then allowed construction 
of a curve the slope of which indicates the 
absolute permeability of the membrane 
to chloride (Figure 13). Since chloride 
and urea permeabilities in cellulose films 
are quite close, the relative permeabilities 
to chloride were then used to rate the 
membranes. The test results obtained 
in this original technique are shown in 
Figure 14. Bemberg PT 150 cuprophane 
0.6 mil. thick was found superior to other 
available membranes and is the mem- 
brane of choice in current cUnical practice. 
Clinical applications of the Dialung 



Fig. 13. Typical carves obtained from chloride 
analyses of a solution in rotating dialysis cell. 
Original formula gives precise quantities of chloride 
passing through a unit area of membrane in 1 
second for a driving concentration difference of one 
milli eqaivalent/L of chloride ion. 



have included a patient with Doriden 
poisoning successfully treated in a 16 



Dta^is in standard jymetrical 
rototing dialysis cell with 
vertical membran 



MEO/l 




/- „ p- b, 


l\^-^.^ 


11 / ■- " -z^ 

1 «so/s^«.o ..«/«>™»*,, ™^^ 


C j^ _ B^^^ 


1 


\^'{\lo'^.) 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MEMBRANE PERMEABILITY STUDIES 



Test 


Cell Perm 


Perm 


MEMBRANE 


Na ClxlO-3 


PSPXlO-3 


Vi-A Unsoftened* 


42 


5.0 


1/2-B 15% S-1* 


45 


8 


1/2 -C 20% S-1* 


46 


10 


Vi-G 20% S-12A* 


47 


8 


Va Unsoftened* 


32 


6.2 


%-B 15% S-1* 


38 


7.3 


y4-E20% 2-2A* 


32 


6.2 


Bemberg .0006" 


94 


15 


Dupont .002" 


57x10-3 


8 


Dupont .002" 






(No Rotation) 


6x10-3 





M2 



Membrane Area == 62 cm2 
in Rotating Test Call 
Test Cell Permeability = meg/ meg . Second 

To Convert to .(„„ . t i,pr« 

Absolute = Meg 'Liters „, Mult. by .0787 
Permeability Mei ' Second • M2 

Fig. 14 

HH 2 54 rRS GLUTErHIMIDE POISONING HEM0DI4LVSIS 
ADMISSION 

ABTEBIAL PRESSURE 




FLUID BALANCE 


+ 709 m 


URINARr OUTPUT 




1 . 


P 1 



8 \2 16 20 
HOURS AFTER ADMISSION 

Fig. 15 Graohical clinical recnrd of a patient 
dialyzed with the Dialung for acute Glutethimide 
(Doriden) poisoning after swallowing 24 half gram 
tablets of Doriden and several "Nods" sleeping cap- 



BUN 
MGV. 



100- 



ATW j2eYRS BICHLORIDE OF MERCURY POISONING 

DOSE- 5 GRAMS TAKEN 

IMMEDIATEir BEFORE 

OMISSION 

DISCHflflGED IO/3f/G5 

SAL 175 Mj ™ BAL 2 5 Mj '/./Kj CREATI 




5 150 




HOSPITAL DAY 



Fig. 16. Graphical clinical record of a young patient 
who sustained acute renal failure after ingestion of 
bichloride of mercury. Dialung dialysis on the 
seventh hospital dav resulted in marked biochemical 
as well as clinical improvement. Spontaneous diuresis 
beginning on the 9th hospital day eliminated the 
need for further dialysis. Recovery was complete. 



hour hemodialysis^^ (Figure 15), a 
patient with renal failure secondary to 
acute bichloride of mercury poisoning 
successfully treated in a single 20 hour 
hemodialysis after which renal function 
gradually returned, a patient with bro- 
mide poisoning successfully treated in 
three 6 hour dialyses and number of 
patients with renal failure due to shock, 
methanol intoxication and crushing 
injuries who were also successfully treated. 

Summary 

The design parameters for an optimized 
artificial kidney system have been pre- 
sented together with a new compact, 
pumpless, clinical hemodialyzer ( Dia- 
lung) that meets desired optimization 
parameters in clinical practice. This dia- 
lyzer can be employed to further lower 
the cost of, and to increase the safety 
and efficiency of hemodialysis. 



10 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ESMOND, STRAUCFI, CLARK, LEWITIKN, MOORE— DIALUNG 



Addendum 

Since the preparation of this paper 5 addi- 
tional patients have been accepted for long 
term twice a week hemodialysis. In the case of 
one 37-year-old man, who was a computer 
operator for the Social Security Administration, 
and whose wife is a nurse, the entire simple 
hemodialysis procedure is now being carried 
on at home without physician intervention. Cost 
analysis figures indicate that the Dialung system 
for home chronic twice a week hemodialysis 
can be operated for a total cost for equipment 
and supplies for one year for from between 
$1500 and $1800 a year. 

This simplified, low cost system opens a new 
therapeutic horizon to the 100,000 patients 
succumbing to renal disease in the United States 
each year. The Public Health Services esti- 
mates that from 10,000 to 20,000 of the pa- 
tients can be maintained in reasonably good 
health by twice a week hemodialysis. Only 
350 patients are now being treated twice a 
week by other hemodialysis techniques because 
of the high cost of operation of other artificial 
kidneys. The Dialung is simple enough to be 
used by a housewife and can obviously be 
applied by every physician in general practice. 

References 

1. Abel. J. J., Rountree, L. G., and Turner, 
B. B.; Removal of Diffusible Substances by 
Dialysis. /. Pharmacol Exp Ther 5:275, 1914. 

2. KoLFF, W. J., and Watschinger, B.; 
Further Development of a Coil Kidney, Dis- 
posable Artificial Kidney. J Lab Clin Med 
47:969, 1956. 

3. Alwall, N.; On the Artificial Kidney. 
I. Apparatus for Dialysis of the Blood in Vivo. 
Acta Med Scan 128:211, 1947. 

4. Skeggs, L. T., Jr., Leonards, J. R., and 
Heisler, C. R.; Artificial Kidney 11. Con- 
struction and Operation of an Improved Con- 
tinuous Dialyzer. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 
72:539, 1949 



5. MacNeill. A. E.; Technic with Paral- 
lel Flow, Straight Tube Blood Dialyzer. New 
York J Med 59:\4, 1959. 

6. KiiL, F.; Development of a Parallel Flow, 
Artificial Kidney in Plastics. Acta Clin Scand 
f.Si,ppl)25.^:\43. I960. 

7. Scribner. B. H., Buri, R., Caner, J. E. Z., 
Hegstrom, R., and Burnell, J. M.; The 
Treatment of Chronic Uremia by Means of 
Intermittent Hemodialysis: A Preliminary Re- 
port, Trans Amer Soc Art hit Org 6.114, 1960. 

8. QuiNTON. W., DiLLARD, D., and Scribner, 
B. H.; Cannulation of Blood Vessels for Pro- 
longed Hemodialysis, Trans Amer Soc Art Int 
Org 6 :W-i. 1960. 

9. Hegstrom, R. M., Murray, J. S., 
Pendras, J. P., Burnell, J. M., and Scribner, 
B. S.; Two Years Experience with Periodic 
Hemodialysis in Treatment of Chronic Uremia, 
Trans Amer Soc Art Int Org 8:266, 1962. 

10. Murray, J. S., Pendras, J. P., Lind- 
HOLM, D. D., and Erickson, R. V.; Twenty- 
Five Months Experience in the Treatment of 
Chronic Uremia In and Out Patient Community 
Hemodialysis Center, Trans Amer Soc Art Int 
Org 10:191, 1964. 

11. Esmond, W. G., Strauch, M., Baker, 
B., Lewitinn, A., Attar, S., Blair, E., 
Cowley, R. Adams,- Compact Autoclavable 
Counter Current Hemodialyzer with Disposable 
Components. Biomedical Sciences Instrumenta- 
tion, Vol. I, Plenum Press, New York, 1963. 

12. Esmond, W. G., Strauch, M., Clark, 
H.; Mathematical Analysis and Optimization 
of a Compact, Low Cost, Pumpless, System for 
Hemodialysis (Dialung). Proceedings 18th An- 
nual Conference on Engineering in Medicine 
and Biology 7:48, 1965. 

13. Esmond, W. G., Strauch, M.; Success- 
ful Treatment of a Severe Glutethimide (Dori- 
den) Poisoning With An Optimized Artificial 
Kidney (Dialung), Invest Uro (March or 
May, 1966). In Press. 



January, 1966 



Chromosomal Mosaicism in Gonadal Dysgenesis 

Report of a Case 

HANS-DIETER TAUBERT, M.D., ERICA F. MOSZKOWSKI, M.D.* 



THE ENTITY of primary amenorrhea, 
short stature, webbing of the neck, and 
cubitus valgus, has become known as 
Turner's syndrome. It is often associated 
with muhiple congenital anomalies, par- 
ticularly those of the cardiovascular 
system. The gamut of this syndrome may 
range from the classical Turner's syn- 
drome with severe defects to the so-called 
pure gonadal dysgenesis,^'' where the 
pathology is Hmited to the gonads. The 
common pathognomonic denominator is 
the absence of germ cells. The ovaries 
consist merely of streaks of stromal tissue 
with no ova being present. Ford^ recog- 
nized in 1959 that this syndrome is 
characterized by the absence of one X 
chromosome, except for rare cases.^* Of 
particular theoretical and practical interest 
are those cases where 2 stem-lines of cells 
are present. One contains the normal 
modal number of chromosomes, while 
the other is hypoploid due to the lack of 
one X chromosome. Chromosomal 
mosaicism with XO/XX configuration of 
the sex chromosomes is next to XO the 
most common finding in gonadal dysgene- 
sis. Miller was recently able to review 
over 25 reported cases. !• ^' ''• ^- !"• ^i' ^^■ 
"■ 1* It is the purpose of this paper to 
report and discuss another case of gonadal 
dysgenesis with chromosomal mosaicism. 

Case Report 

C. J., U. H. #29-17-32. This 15-year-old 
Negro girl was first seen in the Gynecologic 
Endocrine Clinic on June 30, 1964. Her chief 
complaint was stunted growth, primary am- 



enorrhea, and minimal development of the 
secondary sex characteristics. Her height was 
142.5 cm. She weighed 107 lbs.; the span was 
150 cm. On general inspection the patient had 
a short neck with a trace of webbing. The 
chest was shield-like and the nipples wide- 
spaced, small and flat. There was no areolar 
pigmentation. Auxiliary and pubic hair was 
sparse (Table 1, Fig. 1). Her hands were 
remarkably long, with spidery fingers, and 
hyperextensible joints. The palms were spoon- 
shaped and could not be completely flattened. 
The fourth toe on the right foot was short. 
No cardiac anomalies were found. The 
patient had poor vision in one eye due to 
strabismus. Color vision was normal. 

Examination with the patient under anes- 
thesia disclosed a small cervix, atrophic labia, 
and an intact hymen. There was no stimula- 
tion of the vaginal mucosa. Adnexal structures 
could not be palpated. 

Table 1 — Malformations and Laboratory Data 

A. EXTERNAL MALFORMATIONS 

Webbing of the neck trace 

Low implantation of the hair present 

Short fourth metatarsal bone present 

Epicanthic folds present 

Cubitus valgus present 

Arachnodactyly present 

Spoon-shaped palms present 

Shield-like chest with wide present 

spaced nipples 

Pigmented naevi absent 



* From the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. 



B. RADIOLOGIC MALFORMATIONS 


Sella turcica 




normal 


Bone age 




normai 


Osteoporosis 




absent 


C. FAMILY 






Number in sibship 




% 


Age of mother at birth 




29 


Age of father at birth 




33 


Malformations in family 




absent 


Consanguinity in family 




absent 


X-ray, viral disease, etc. ar 


ound 




conception 




absent 


D. LABORATORY DATA 




no estrogen effect 


Vaginal cytology 




24<7f positive 


Sex-chromatin, rt. buccal c 


ivity 


18% positive 


Sex-chromatin, It. buccal cavity 


53/1000 


"Drumsticks" 




xo/xx 


Sex-chromosome confignrat 


on 


44-0 


Chromosome number 




45-34 (51.4%) 


Total urinary gonadotroph] 


ns 


46-32 (48.6%) 


17-ketosteroid excretion 




47-0 


Protein-bound iodine 




more than 50 


Xga Proposita 




mu/24 hrs. 


Mother 




2 mg./24 hrs. 


Sister 




7.7 mcg% 


Dermatoglyphics 




Xga ( + ) 
Xga ( + ) 
Xga ( + ) 
compatible 

Vol. SI, Ko. 1 



TAUBERT. MOSZKOWSKI— CHROMOSOMAL MOSAICISM 




FiB. 1 

Laboratory Data: On August 5, 1964, 26% 
of the buccal mucosal cells were positive for 
sex-chromatin. On March 2, 1965, a repeat 
examination of both the right and left buccal 
mucosa showed 24% chromatin-positive cells 
on the right including 6% very small ones. 



The smear on the left revealed the presence 
of Barr bodies in 18% of the cells with 4% 
being small ones. Fifty-three polymorpho- 
nuclear leukocytes per 1,000 were found to be 
posiiive for the presence of "drum sticks." 

Vaginal cytology from June 30, 1964, did not 
show any evidence of estrogenic stimulation. 

Chromosomal Analysis: White blood cells 
were cultured by a modification of the method 
of Moorhead.'-' Sixty-six ceils were suitable 
for analysis. Thirty-two showed the normal 
modal number of 46 chromosomes. The re- 
maining 34 cells lacked one of the large sub- 
metacentric chromosomes of group 6-12 
(Denver Classification)- or C (Patau). 15 This 
was interpreted as mosaicism of the X-chromo- 
somes with the following two stem-lines: 
45 (XO)/46 (XX). 

Gonadotrophin excretion: The 24-hour value 
for total urinary' gonadotrophins exceeded 50 
mouse-units (more than adult normal). 

The 17-ketosteroids were 2 mg./24 hour 
urine. 

X-ray studies: The sella turcica was normal. 
The bone age was compatible with 14.5 years. 
Osteoporosis was not evident. 

Dermatolglyphics:'^^ The axial triradius was 
in t' position. The adt-angle exceeded 50°. 
All digits with the exception of digits V sinister 
showed ulnar loops. The latter had a whirl. 
The total digital ridge count was 144; the 
ridge count was 144; the ridge count between 
triradius a and b was 58. For comparison the 
same data were obtained from her younger 
sister: Axial triradius t, adt-angle 45°, digital 
ridge count 132 (normal range); a-b ridge 
count 45 (normal); whirls on digitus I and II 
right and left, and digitus III on the right. 
The remaining finger had ulnar loops. 

Comment 

Lack of germ cells in the gonads and 
loss of one X-chromosome in early de- 
velopment are the notable features of this 
entity. It appears that segregation and 
migration of the primitive germ cells from 
the hind-gut to the germinal ridge depends 
upon the presence of 2 X-chromosomes.'' 
Embryonal cells do not show many 
chromocenters prior to day 16-18 of de- 
velopment. After segregation of the primi- 
tive germ cells, however, one of them be- 
comes genetically inactive and as such 



January, 1966 



13 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



the chromocenter or the Barr body.* Fail- 
ure of the primitive germ cells to arrive at 
the germinal ridge seems to arrest the 
gonad at the stage of the primitive, in- 
different medulla.'' Any other cause 
which will prevent this migration will have 
the same result in gonadal development. 
This explains chromatin-positive cases of 
gonadal dysgenesis with normal 46/XX 
karyotype. 

In a case as ours one has to assume that 
the germ cells descended from a stem-line 
with the karyotype 45/XO. Examination 
of more than one tissue could possibly 
have uncovered an even more complex 
system of multiple mosaicism. Differences 
in the percentages of chromatin-positive 
cells from either buccal mucosa have been 
observed.* 

The observed difference of 18% and 
24% respectively cannot be considered 
significant in this context. 

Pre-zygotic maternal or paternal non- 
disjunction during the first or second 
meiotic division is thought to be the cause 
for aneuploid states such as gonadal dys- 
genesis, Klinefelter's syndrome, autosomal 
trisomies, et cetera. In contrast, chro- 
mosomal mosaics are beheved to origi- 
nate from faulty division of the zy- 
gote.^ * ^ Mitiotic non-disjunction or loss 
of an X-chromosome due to anaphase lag 
have been postulated as possible mecha- 
nisms. 

The maternal or paternal origin of the 
X-chromosome in such individual can be 
studied by investigating sex linked traits. 
Color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate- 
dehydrogenase deficiency, and Duchenne's 
atrophy were not applicable in the case 
presented. Determination of the Xg blood 
group can be most helpful in this aspect, 
since presence of the Xg'' (-f) allele 
assures dominance of the trait. ^-^ Since 
all accessible members of the family were 
Xg^ ( + ). no further information could 
be gained in this aspect. 



Mitotic non-disjunction at the first i 
cleavage division would have resulted in 
an X/XXX embryo. The triple-X stem- 
line would be recognizable by virtue of 
the supernumerary chromosome. A num- 
ber of buccal smear cells would contain 
2 Barr bodies, representing 2 inacti- 
vated X-chromosomes. The most likely 
explanation is that an XX zygote lost 
one of the sex chromosomes during ana- 
phase at the first cleavage division, re- 
sulting in equal proportions of XO/XX 
cells as observed. This cell type could 
also have originated in mitotic non-dis- 
junction at the second cleavage division. 
However, one would have to assume that 
the zygote was originally XO, and the 
proportion between the 2 cell lines should 
not be even. 

Dermatoglyphic examinations have 
been used successfully in characterizing 
various congenital anomalies. The con- 
figuration of the dermal ridges are laid 
down at a very early stage of develop- 
ment, around the third month. i* The 
propositus showed some of the typical 
findings: t' position of the axial triradius, 
increased adt-angle, and an increased 
dermal ridge count. 

Treatment 

The patient was placed on estrogen- 
substitution therapy with the aim to in- 
duce development of the secondary sex 
characteristics, and hopefully to induce 
further growth. Figure 2 attests to 
the effectiveness of this regimen as to the 
former, e.g., after 6 months of 0.2 mg. of 
stilbestrol, q.d. No further growth oc- 
curred. Cyclic therapy will be instituted 
for induction of menstrual cycles as soon 
as the development of the genitalia is 
sufficient. 

Summary 
A 15-year-old-Negro girl presented 
with stunted growth, primary amenorrhea, 
and lacking development of the secondary 



14 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



TAUBERT, MOSZKOWSKI— CHROMOSOMAL MOSAICISM 




sex characteristics. Chromosomal analy- 
sis confirmed the clinical impression of 
gonadal dysgenesis. The karyotype pre- 
sented as a mosaic containing two cell 



lines: 45 (XO)/46 (XX). Estrogenic 
replacement therapy resulted in satis- 
factory development of the secondary sex 
characteristics. The origin of the chromo- 
somal defect was discussed. 

Acknowledgment 

The help of Miss E. Jahn of the Baltimore 
Rh-Typing Laboratory in obtaining the Xg- 
Typing is gratefully acknowledged. 

References 

1. De La Chapelle, A: Cytogenetical and 
Clinical Observations in Female Gonadal Dys- 
genesis, Ada Endocr., 65.1, 1962 (Suppl.). 

2. Editorial: A Proposed Standard Nomen- 
clature of Human Mitotic Chromosomes, Amer. 
J. Human Genet., i2;384. 

3. Ford, C. E., Jones, K. W., Polani, P. E., 
De Almeida, J. C, and Briggs, J. H.: A Sex 
Chromosome Anomaly in a Case of Gonadal 
Dysgenesis, Lancet, i.-711, 1959. 

4. Froland, A., JOHNSEN, S. G., Andersen, 
P., Dein, E., Sanger, and Race, R. R.: Non- 
disjunction and XXY Men, Lancet, 2.1121-22, 
1963. 

5. Griboff, S. O. and Lawrence, R: The 
Chromosomal Etiology of Congenital Gonadal 
Defects, Amer. J. Med., i0.-544-563, 1961. 

6. Grumbach, M. M. and Morishima, A.: 
Sex Chromatin and the Sex Chromosomes: 
On the Origin of Sex Chromatin from a Single 
X Chromosome, Acta CytoL, <5;46-60, Jan. -Feb. 
1962. 

7. Jones, H. W., Ferguson-Smith, M. A., 
and Heller, R. H.: The Pathology and Cyto- 
genetics of Gonadal Agenesis, Amer. J. Obstet. 
Gynec, 87:51?,, 1963. 

8. LiNDSTEN, J.: The Nature and Origin of 
X Chromosome Aberrations in Turner's Syn- 
drome, Almquist and Wiksell, Stockholm, 1963. 

9. LiNDSTEN, J., et al.: Source of the X 
in XO Females: The Evidence of X7, Lancet, 
/.■558-559, 1963. 

10. Mellinger, M.: Turner's Syndrome 
with XO/XX Mosaicism, Henry Ford Hasp. 
Med. Bull., i2.-181-186, 1964. 

11. MiKKELSEN, M., Froland, A., and 
Ellebjerg, J.: XO/XX Mosaicism in a Pair 
of Presumably Monozygotic Twins with Dif- 
ferent Phenotypes, Cytogenetics, 2.-86-98, 1963. 

12. Miller, O. J.: The Sex Chromosome 
Anomalies, Amer. J. Obstet. Gynec, 90.1078, 
1964. 



January, 1966 



15 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



13. MOORHEAD, P. S., NOWELL, P. C, MELL- 

MAN, N. J., Battipps, D. M., and Hunger- 
ford, D. A.: Chromosome Preparations of 
Leukocytes Cultured from Human Peripheral 
Blood, Exp. Cell. Res., 20:613, 1960. 

14. MoszKOwsKi, E. F., De Luca, L., and 
Taubert, H. D.: Pure Gonadal Dysgenesis, 
Obslet. & Gynec, 25:329, 1965. 

15. Patau, K. : Chromosome Identification 
and the Denver Report, Lancet, 1:933, 1961. 

16. Penrose, L. S.: Fingerprints, Palms and 
Chromosomes, Nature. 197:933, 1963. 



17. Vaharu, T., Voorhess, M. L., Leibow, 
L. G., Cara, J., Patton, R. G., and Gardner, 
L. I,: XX/XO Mosaicism in a Girl, /. Pediat., 
6/.750-754, 1962. 

18. Van Wijk, J. A. M., Blankenborg, 
G. J., and Stolte, L. A. M.: XO/XX Mosaic- 
ism and Mongolism in the Same Person, Lancet, 
/.■171, 1964. 

19. Warren, J. C, Erkman, B., Cheatum, 
S., and HOLMAN, G.: Hilus Cell Adenoma in a 
Dysgenetic Gonad with XX/XO Mosaicism, 
Lancet, i.141-143, 1963. 



Vol. 51, No. 1 




MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



Dear Students, Members of the Alumni, and Friends of the Medical 
School: 

The accumulation of knowledge has greatly increased the necessity 
that medical science be taught and understood in an integrated 
manner. The function of cells, organs and systems are so inter- 
related that the various disciplines dealing with them must be taught 
in a coordinated manner. This is effected by having the Curriculum 
and Instruction Committee made up of faculty members that repre- 
sent the medical faculty as a whole rather than their department. 

These individuals are usually younger faculty with less established 
standing in the departmental structure. This makes it easier for 
them to accept and appreciate the necessity to present overall infor- 
mation in a coordinated way. For example, the kidney and kidney 
function is taught on a structural, functional basis and the influence 
of abnormal factors, including disease, is presented at the same time. 
This involves an integrated presentation from the viewpoints of 
anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, neurology, pathology and finally 
clinical pharmacology. 

The difference between older methods of teaching and those now 
in vogue is primarily the teaching of all of these subjects in an 
integrated way rather than isolated departmental presentations with 
considerable separation due to time. 

The Faculty Curriculum and Instruction Committee of this Medical 
School is effectively working to bring about these changes in the 
medical education program at Maryland. 



Sincerely, 



William S. Stone, M.D. 
Dean 



January, 1966 



Reorganization of School Administration 



With the retirement of Dr. D. C. 
Smith, some reorganization has taken place 
in the Administration of Curriculum, 
Student Affairs, and Admissions in the 
School of Medicine. Dean Stone has nomi- 
nated three assistant deans. 

Three members of the faculty have been 
invited to serve as assistant deans. The 
first of these is Dr. Eugene J. Linberg, 
assistant professor of surgery who will serve 
as assistant dean for Curriculum and In- 
struction. 

Dr. Linberg's areas of responsibility will 
include studies of the curriculum of the 
School of Medicine and methods of in- 
struction. He will also give attention to 
the coordination of special lectures and will 
be responsible for class scheduling and 
student section assignments. 

Other studies will include the coordination 
of student research projects, counseling and 
planning of the use of free time by students 



and the important duty of scheduling 
National and State Board examinations for 
the second and fourth year classes. He 
will serve as chairman of the Honors Com- 
mittee and will conduct a follow-up of gradu- 
ates performance and career development. 
He will be responsible for the care of 
student records and grades. 

Dr. Karl H. Weaver of the department 
of pediatrics will serve as assistant dean 
for admissions. Dr. Weaver's areas of re- 
sponsibility will include the important post 
of chairman of the Admissions Committee. 
He will also edit and prepare the catalog 
of the School of Medicine. He will act 
as liasion on admissions for the Association 
of American Medical Colleges and will con- 
duct studies of admissions data including 
student selection. He will conduct a follow- 
up on student performance from the ad- 
missions viewpoint. He will be concerned 
with admission problems of graduate 




DR. WEAVER 



DR. ROSENHOLTZ 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



students as they are involved in the School 
of Medicine. Dr. Weaver will also serve 
as coordinator with premedical advisers 
in the numerous colleges and universities 
from which applications are received. 

Dr. Mitchell J. Rosenholtz, assistant pro- 
fessor of pathology, will serve as assistant 
dean for Student Affairs. This important 
area of responsibility will include the re- 
sponsibility as secretary for the Faculty 
Committee on Scholarships and Loans. Dr. 
Rosenholtz will also serve as liaison with 
students and student advisors and will con- 
duct the" Freshman and Junior Orientation 
programs in September of each year. He 
w ill serve as chairman of the Student Activi- 
ties Committee and chairman of the Student 



Advancement Committee counseling on con- 
ditions and failures. He will advise the 
Dean on matters of student discipline. 

Dr. Rosenholtz will also study the matters 
of student social liaison, student informa- 
tion and will maintain student registration 
and Blue Cross records. He will serve as 
liaison on the national intern matching pro- 
gram. He will also be responsible for the 
student aspects of the precommencement 
and commencement exercises. 

Dr. Stone advises the Bulletin that 
while there are many overlapping areas 
of responsibility, the three assistant deans 
will work in close cooperation with Dr. 
Stone in order to provide a smooth work- 
ing and efficient administrative team. 



January, 1966 




Dr. Bradley Retires as Pediatric Head 



Dr. J. Edmund Bradley, for many years 
professor and chairman of the department 
of pediatrics at the School of Medicine, re- 
tired on September 1, 1965, after 31 years 
of service to the School of Medicine, 17 
of them as head of the Department of 
Pediatrics. 

A physician of the old tradition. Dr. 
Bradley was in part-time private practice 
for a number of years before being named 
full-time professor of pediatrics. Despite an 
intense scientific program, Dr. Bradley 
always maintained a child-oriented depart- 
ment, championed by his personal kindliness 
and consideration. 

During his tenure, a number of precedents 
and developments occurred. He established 
a unique pediatric research laboratory to 
explore fundamental problems encountered 
in clinical pediatrics. He introduced many 
innovations in patient care, not alone with 
the hospital but in the out-patient clinics 
conducted throughout the state as well as 
in the City of Baltimore. He organized a 
teaching program for medical students and 
a training program for interns and residents 
rated in 1964 as "one of the top 5 programs 



in the nation." He maintained as well an 
active connection with the Department of 
Psychiatry. The Department of Pediatrics 
was actively affiliated with the Lutheran 
Hospital of Maryland. 

Dr. Bradley always felt a deep obligation 
to the community that prompted him during 
his tenure at the University to initiate and 
to participate in innumerable projects that 
have vastly increased the contribution of 
the university to the welfare of children 
and their parents throughout the Sate of 
Maryland. 

A few of Dr. Bradley's accomplishments 
may serve to indicate the wide range of 
his influence. In the field of science, he 
was the first to observe and describe hyper- 
tension in children associated with Wilm's 
tumor. He also developed a number of 
successful and widely used treatments for 
controlling epidemic viral vomiting. He 
brought attention to the high incidence of 
lead poisoning among the lower socioeco- 
nomic groups in the City of Baltimore and 
his work in the pediatric research laboratory 
led to effective treatment for lead encephalo- 
pathy. Due to his recognition of the cause 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



of lead poisoning the incidence of serious 
lead intoxication was reduced through early 
recognition and prompt treatment in clinics, 
including the one he established at the Uni- 
versity Hospital. 

He was among the first to correlate poly- 
cythemia and pheochromocytoma and to 
identify its cause as erythropoietin, a sub- 
stance secreted by the adrenal. 

Dr. Bradley was consultant to several 
publications, including Current Medical 
Digest, and was himself the author of more 
than 50 scientific publications. 

During his tenure, a high degree of ex- 
cellence in both undergraduate and post- 
graduate pediatric teaching was maintained. 
He extended the medical school's training 
program in pediatrics to a number of com- 
munity hospitals in Baltimore, including the 
Lutheran Hospital, in order to improve the 
care of children in those institutions. He 
developed the first pediatric outpatient clinic 
at the Provident Hospital. The first two 
Negro physicians to complete a program 
of training in pediatrics were later certified 
by the American Board and entered active 
practice in this specialty. 

Working with Dr. Allen F. Voshell, 
director of Kernan's Hospital, Dr. Bradley 
consummated an agreement to provide pedi- 
atric resident coverage there as well as at 
the St. Agnes and Bon Secours Hospitals. 

A consultant's consultant. Dr. Bradley was 
always available for general advice to the 
City Health Department and state officials. 
He served on numerous councils, boards, 
and committees including the State Council 
of Medical Care (1952-1961), the State 
Board of Health and Mental Hygiene (1961, 
reappointed to 1971), the Steering Com- 
mittee on Mental Retardation (1964), the 
Organizational Committee of the State 
Board of Health and Mental Hygiene 
( 1961 ), the Staffing Committee of the Board 
of Health aad Mental Hygiene (since 1961 ), 
and the Committee of the Fetus and the 
Newborn of the American Academy of 
Pediatrics (1958-1964). 

As a member of the Committee on State 
Planning for the Handicapped Children, he 
helped establish the Central Evaluation and 



Diagnostic Clinics at the University of 
Maryland and the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

He was a member of the Committee on 
Planning for Residential Centers for the 
Mentally Retarded, and worked with the 
Sisters of St. Francis in establishing a school 
for the mentally retarded, and with the 
Sisters of St. Gabriel's to establish a home 
for similarly afflicted children. 

He was instrumental in instituting and 
organizing pediatric psychiatry in the 
Psychiatric Institute of the University of 
Maryland and later in the establishment of 
an in-patient unit for children there. He 
also laid the ground work for the develop- 
ment of a cooperative research program 
between the School of Medicine and the 
Rosewood State Hospital for mentally re- 
tarded children. 

Dr. Bradley was President of the Uni- 
versity Hospital's medical staff in 1952 and 
in 1954. He was chairman of the executive 
committee of St. Joseph's Hospital for two 
years and later secretary of the pediatric 
section of the Baltimore City Medical So- 
ciety. He was secretary and treasurer of 
Alpha Omega Alpha Honorary Society in 
Maryland from 1953 to 1956 and later 
served as counselor of the chapter from 
1956 to 1959. He was a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the Hospital Council of 
Maryland and member of the University 
of Maryland Senate. 

Dr. Bradley, a native Baltimorean, is an 
alumnus of Loyola College and of the 
Georgetown University School of Medicine. 
Upon his retirement members of his depart- 
ment presented the School of Medicine with 
an excellent portrait by Stanislav Rembski 
which is reproduced herein. 

Dr. Bradley, upon retirement, moved to 
his favorite second home on Cape Cod, 
Massachusetts. However, after a short rest, 
he plans to be available for such consultation 
and advice as could be of use in the ad- 
vancement of pediatrics, his chosen specialty, 
and the field in which this great humani- 
tarian, physician, scholar, and administrator 
has created for himself an enviable place 
and a distinguished reputation. 



January, 1966 



faculty 



NOTES 



Dr. Samuel P. Bessman, professor of 
pediatric research, spoke on the subject of 
fluid balance at the Children's Hospital in 
Akron, Ohio, on October 26th, and the fol- 
lowing day at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, 
Minnesota. 



Dr. Samuel P. Bessman, professor of 
pediatric research, was one of 3 co-chairmen 
at the scientific seminars held at the Rose- 
wood State Hospital on November 21, 1965. 



Dr. John M. Dennis, professor and 
chairman of the department of radiology 
and for several years president of the 
Maryland Division, American Cancer So- 
ciety, was honored by the society on the 
occasion of a recent meeting of the board 
of directors. Dr. Dennis was presented with 
the American Cancer Society's bronze medal 
and certificate in recognition of his out- 
standing contributions to the control of 
cancer. Dr. Dennis will continue as a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Mary- 
land division. 



On the occasion of the Thirteenth Post- 
graduate Course, the 1966 Diabetes in Re- 
view, sponsored by the American Diabetes 
Association at the Mayflower Hotel in Wash- 
ington, D. C, a paper entitled "The Action 
of Insulin" was presented by Dr. Samuel 
P. Bessman, professor of pediatric research 
and professor of biochemistry at the School 
of Medicine. 



Dr. Emil Blair, assistant professor of 
surgery, is on sabbatical leave for a year 
at Sweden's oldest medical school, the Uni- 
versity of Uppsala, where he will participate 
in all activities of the department of thor- 
acic surgery. 



ANATOMISTS VISIT BALTIMORE 

Many years ago anatomists were pri- 
marily descriptive morphologists. Now, 
many study living tissues — in four di- 
mensions (3 of space, and one of time) — 
and anatomy and physiology become one. 
Anatomists dissect tissues and cells with 
the electron microscope, magnify intracellu- 
lar particles many thousands of times until 
they are, in fact, studying the anatomy of 
protein molecules, i.e., biochemical anatomy. 
It has been well said that anatomy today 
is anything that an anatomist thinks about. 
On November 19 and 20, more than 100 
members of the Southern Society of Anato- 
mists, representing over 40 American 
medical schools and 5 foreign universities, 
met at the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine. More than 30 papers were 
presented at sessions held in Davidge Hall. 
They ranged in subject matter from gross 
anatomy, histochemistry, neuroanatomy 
endocrinology, muscle physiology, hypo- 
thermia, comparative anatomy, pulmonary 
anatomy, and physiology to electron micro- 
scopy. 

Dr. Vernon E. Krahl, professor in the 
department of anatomy, as this year's presi- 
dent of the Southern Society of Anatomists, 
was host to the membership in Baltimore. 
Following the formal program on Friday, 
November 19, the group enjoyed a social 
hour followed by the annual dinner in La 
Ronde, atop the Holiday Inn, seeing a re- 
volving, panoramic view of Baltimore by 
night. Featured speakers at the dinner pro- 
gram were Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, vice presi- 
dent for the Baltimore Campuses of the 
University of Maryland, and Dr. John Z. 
Bowers, director of the Josiah Macy 
Foundation. 

In addition to papers from the platform 
and annual business meeting, Saturday's pro- 
gram included a symposium on "Novel 
Methods of Teaching Anatomy," in which 
members of the society demonstrated special 
and original techniques for helping medical 
and dental students to understand and re- 
member key facts and relationships in their 
studies of human anatomy. 

The Southern Society of Anatomists 



Vol SI, No. 1 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



serves several useful and important roles in 
anatomical teaching and research today. It 
not only provides, in the Fall, an oppor- 
tunity for the exchange of information and 
ideas as well as the regular Spring meeting 
of the national group (The American As- 
sociation of Anatomists) but it has been 
able to maintain a single-session format and 
a less formal atmosphere in which medical 
and graduate students, too, may have a 
podium and a less formidable, perhaps more 
sympathetic, audience than at the larger, 
multiple-session meetings of the national 
organization. Formerly, each medical school 
was required to devise its own summer 
teaching program in anatomy for its weaker 
students, repeaters, etc. Now, under the 
aegis of the Southern Society of Anatomists, 
it has been arranged so that in any par- 
ticular summer only one of some 25 
southern medical schools is obliged to 
offer a comprehensive course in anatomy. 



Students of the member schools, needing 
to strengthen their grasp of anatomy, attend 
these special courses. Thus, just one, not 
25, schools is obliged to engage its faculty 
of anatomy in summer teaching. 

During the recent meetings, architectural 
features of Davidge Hall, such as hidden 
dissecting rooms and secret spiral stair- 
cases (reminiscent of the early days when 
an aroused populace often objected to 
human dissection), were opened and dis- 
played to the visitors. This reminded an- 
atomists of their stormy early history and 
of the fact that the University of Maryland 
was the first American medical school to 
require human dissection as part of the 
regular medical curriculum. They were 
also reminded that Davidge Hall is the 
oldest building in America to be used con- 
tinuously in medical education since its 
erection in 1812. — Vernon E. Krahl, M.D. 



January, 1966 



Los Auiigos de Cajal Dedicate Memorial Bust at Petilla 



At dedication ceremonies attended by 
more than 30 American and Spanish neu- 
rologists, a bust of Santiago Roman y Cajal 
was dedicated at Petilla on Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 14, 1965. 

The Amigos organization, an international 
group, was headed by Dr. Charles Van Bus- 
kirk of York, Pennsylvania and a member 
of the faculty of the School of Medicine. 
The European organization was headed by 
Dr. Alberto Portera, formerly of the staff 
of the School of Medicine of the University 
of Maryland, and now practicing neurologist 
in Madrid. 

Early in 1965, prominent American and 
Canadian neurologists were contacted con- 
cerning the development of a memorial to 
be placed at the birthplace of the eminent 
neurohistologist. More than 115 sub- 
scriptions were received following which 
the preparation of the bronze head of Cajal 
proceeded. 

Following the conclusion of the Inter- 
national Neurologic Congress in Vienna, the 
group gathered in Madrid and under the 
guidance of Dr. and Mrs. Portera con- 
cluded a tour of the environment of Cajal 
and viewed the numerous monuments and 
memorials to him including a visit to the 
Cajal Institute where the group viewed 




Bust of Don Santiago Ri 



an y Cajal in its present 
de of the village church 
Petilla. 




Don Luis Ramon y Cajal speaks at nnveilinff ceremony. 

viii 



the original work bench and equipment with 
which the important discoveries were made 
and, as well, the memorabilia of the honors 
and awards which came to Cajal in his 
later years. This was followed by a bus 
journey to Zaragoza and a visit to the 
school of medicine where Cajal studied as 
a young man and where he later began 
his anatomic work. This was followed by a 
journey to Haja and then to Petilla where 
the ceremonies were held. 

From the local press the following is ex- 
tracted: 

Yesterday in the Navarrese town of Pe- 
tilla de Aragon, American and Spanish repre- 
sentatives of the friends of Cajal rendered 
homage to the illustrious scientist, born in 

Fo/. 51, No. 1 




View on Main Street of Petilla. 

that town. This homage consisted of the 
placing of a bust donated by the friends of 
Cajal, dedicated in a simple act participated 
in by provincial and local authorities and 
the entire population of the town of Petilla, 
a small town in Aragon perched on a 
sheltered crag under the protection of the 
bold rocks so common in that portion of 
Spain. 

The simple and solmen act was performed 
in the town square adjacent to the parish 
church. Outside, in the porticoes awaited 
the local authordities including the president 
of Navarre, Don Felix Hurate, the deputy 
for the district, Don Amadeo Marco, the 
provincial health officer, Don Javier Vinas, 
the district deputy of Sos, Don Feli.x Cuellar, 
the president of the Physicians College of 
Pamplona, Dr. Garro, the secretary of the 
Prince of Viana Institution, Senor Uranga, 
the president of the Royal Academy of 
Zaragoza, Dr. Oliver Rubio, the mayor of 
Petilla, Senor Sanchez Gaston. 

The group then proceded to the portico 
of the small church where Dr. Van Buskirk 
of York, Pennsylvania and his group were 
met by the officials and the parish priest, 
Don Jesus Auricinea. From the parish 
archives was then read the certificate of 
birth and baptism of Cajal, a simultaneous 
translation into English being provided by 
Dr. Portera. 

"At 9 P.M., May 1, 1925, was born 
and the following day was solemnly bap- 



tised by me, the undersigned vicar, a boy 
child who was named Santiago Felipe, 
legitimate son of Fausto Ramon, surgeon 
and Antonia Cajal, native of Larres and 
resident in this town. Paternal grand- 
parents, Esteban Ramon, farmer, native 
of Isin, Province of Huesca, and Rosa 
Casasus, native of Larres, Province of 
Huesca. Maternal grandparents, Lorenzo 
Cajal, weaver, native of Asso, Province 
of Huesca, and Isabel Fuente, native of 
Larres, Province of Huesca. The god- 
parents were Francisco Sanchez, native 
of Petilla, province of Navarre, and Anna 
Maria Iriarte, native of Isuerre, Province 
of Zaragoza, whom I admonished of the 
spiritual parenthood and the obligations 
which they were contracting. Registered, 
signed, Toribio Barnechea, vicar of Pe- 
tilla." 

At this time a film entitled "The Environ- 
ment of Santiago Cajal" prepared in Spanish 
by Drs. Van Buskirk and Portera was 
shown for the first time to the audience con- 
sisting mainly of residents of Petilla and the 
official party. This was followed by the 
simple act of unveiling the bust. Cajal's son, 
Don Luis Ramon y Cajal, was present at 
the ceremony and uttered some brief moving 
words to express his gratitude. He was fol- 
lowed by Dr. Carrato, director of the Ramon 
y Cajal Institute of Madrid, who in English 
thanked the "Friends of Cajal" for their 
initiative. Dr. Castro, professor of histology 
of the Faculty of Medicine of Madrid, a 
favorite student of the great man, summed 
up with simple clarity the contribution which 
Cajal made to the world of science, con- 
densed, including the neuronal theory, much 
discussed 50 years ago and which today 
is accepted by all neurologists. Dr. Castro 
concluded with reference to the many 
thousands of discoveries which are attributed 
to Cajal and which serve today as guide- 
lines of present day investigation. His ad- 
dress was followed by remarks by Senor 
Huarte who reviewed the life of Cajal and 
finally amidst the applause of all the by- 
standers. Dr. Van Buskirk and the mayor 
of Petilla, Senor Sanchez Gaston, unveiled 
the bust, terminating the ceremony. The 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



official party was next entertained at 
lunclieon, departing for Zaragoza that eve- 
ning. 

A full account of the proceedings was 
contained in the Heraldo de Aragon of the 
day. 

Those participating in the ceremonies at 
Petilla included: Dr. Carrato Ibanez, Dr. 
Castro, Dr. Aguirre, Dr. Calderon, (Mr.) 
Louis Ramon y Cajal, Srta. M. de los 
Angeles Gasset, Dr. Estevez, Col. Hoffman 
U.S.A.F., Dr. Smith, Dr. Charles Van Bus- 
kirk, Dr. Francis W. Ramsay, Dr. A. M. 
Rabiner, Dr Juan Bravo of Madrid. 

Contributors to the Cajal Memorial 
Fund included the following physicians: 
Allen, J. N., Alpers, B. J., Anderson, W. W., 
Arnold, J. G., Bailey, A. A., Blue, W. W., 
Boldrey, E. B., Bordley, J., Coblentz, R. S., 
Cotter, E., Courtois, G. A., Crosby, E. C, 
Currier, R., Davidson, L., DeJong, R., 
Drachman, D. B., Echlin, F. A., Elkes, J., 
Reindel, W., Fox, C, Gantt, H., Garvin, 
J. S., Gibson, W. C, Groff, R. A., Gurdsgian, 
E. S., Hearn, J. B., Heath, R. G., Heck, A., 
Henderson, C. M., Hills, J. R., Hinsey, J. C, 
Horenstein, S., Hulfish, B., Humphrey, T., 



Ingram, W. R., Jacobs, H., Jousse, A. T., 
Joynt, R. J. Kane, C. A., Koenig, H., 
Konigsmark, B. W., Kurland, L. T., Kurtzke, 
J., Lemni, H., Madow, K., Magee, R. R., 
Matzke, H. A., Mericle, E. W., Mettler, 
F. A., Miller, Z. R., Millikan, C. H., Moore, 
M. T., Mosberg, W., McNaughton, F. L., 
Nauta, W., Nelson. E., Odom, G. L., Olden- 
dorf, W. H., Parkinson, D., Peele, T. L., 
Penfield, W., Porter, H., Quadfasel, F. A., 
Rabiner, A. M., Ramsey, F. W., Rasmussen, 
T., Richardson, E. P., Richter, R. B., Robb, 
J. R., Roizin, L., Rose, J. E., Rosenbaum, 
H., Ross, A. T., Scharenberg, K., Schlez- 
inger, N. S., Schmidt, R., Schuster, F. F., 
Scoville, W. B., Segarra, J. M., Shapiro, S., 
Smith, B., Smith, B. H., Snider, R. S., 
Soc. Clin. Neurol., Speakman, T. J., Steeg- 
man, A. T., Stein, J. M., Sullivan, J. F., 
Sweet, W. H., Tarlov, M., Taylor, R. A., 
Teasdall, R., Thompson, H. G., Toman, 
J. E. P., Torres, F., Toupin, H. M., Truex, 
R. C, Tucker, J. C, Utterback, R., Van 
Buskirk, C, Von Benin, G., Wagner, J., 
Walker, A. E., Walsh, F. B., Watson, C. W., 
Weiz, S., Whelan, J., Windle, W. F., Wol- 
barsht, M., Woodson, F. G., Yakovlev, P. 




of Cajal (L to R) : Dr. Portera. Madrid: 
ravo. Madrid: and Dr. Wagner, U. S. A. 



Vol 51. No. 1 




ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



President's Letter 



MEDICAL 

ALVMM ASSOCIATION 

Officers 1965-66 

C. Parke Scarborough. M.D. 

President 
Howard B, XrAvs. M.D. 

Prcsidcniclect 
Lewis Klair Woodward. M.D. 

I 'iccPrcsidcnt 
John A. Mora.v, M D. 

ricc-Prcsidcot 
Morris Nicholson. M.D. 

Vke-Prcsidoit 
Walter E. Karfcin. M.D. 



William H. Triplett. M.D. 

E.rfcuth'c Director 
^^RS. Louise Girkin- 

F.xceutive Secretary 

Board of Directors 

William J. Supik. ^LD. 
Hugh B. McXally, M.D. 
Emmanuel A. Schimunek, M.D. 
William H. Kammer, Jr.. M.D. 
Robert B. Goldsteix, M.D. 
John D. Young. Jr.. M.D. 
Harry C. Bowie, M.D. 
John O. Sharrett, M.D. 
Theodore E. Stacy, M.D. 

Secretary 
Gibson J. Wells, M.D. 

cx-officio 
J. Howard Franz, M.D. 



Nominatins: Co 

Gibson J. Weli 
Chairman 



mittee 

M.D. 

, M.D. 



J. Howard Fran 

er-officio 
Emmanuel Schimunek, M.D. 
Wilford Townshend, Jr., M.D. 
Donald H. Dembo. M.D. 



Repr 



ntati' 



to 



neral Alu 

Parke S 



E. I. Cornbrooks, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 

Representatives to 

Editorial Board, BULLETIN 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 
John F. Savage, ^LD. 
Arthur G. Siwinski, M.D. 
C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 



Representatives to 
Faculty Board (3 year term) 
C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 
Howard B. Mays, M.D. 



Fellow Medical Aluiniii: 

Five years ago the surgical faculty of the medical 
school decided to form a surgical society composed of 
the faculty, former surgical residents of the University 
Hospital, and faculty members and former surgical resi- 
dents of affiliated hospitals and thus came into being 
the University of Maryland Surgical Society. The fol- 
lowing year members of the department of internal 
medicine started a similar group. Many years previously 
the obstetrical and gynecological department had organ- 
ized the Douglass Society and subsequently the pedia- 
tricians joined together in a like manner. Each of these 
societies started a program and periodic meetings which 
grew in interest and attendance. 

Two years ago a new precedent was set when all 
four of these organizations joined together with the 
University of Maryland Medical Alumni Association 
in a joint professional and social reunion. This was a 
tremendous success and it was unanimously agreed that 
this reunion should be repeated in two years, to be 
renewed at the end of each two year span. 1966 
marks the first renewal of this program. 

Dr. John Sharrett, the general chairman of the affair, 
has been working diligently since May 1965 on the 
1966 meeting. The chairmen of the other groups have 
met with Dr. Sharrett and have outlined most im- 
pressive individual society programs. Abstracts of 
papers presented for approval have arrived from many 
states and numerous foreign countries. Tentative ar- 
rangements have been made for a special issue of the 
American Surgeon to be turned over to this year's 
surgical program and similar arrangements have been 
made by the groups in medicine, obstetrics and gyne- 
cology, and pediatrics. This reunion is increasing in 
interest and of importance to us all and we may well 
be proud of this which the University of Maryland has 
created. This may well set a pattern for other organiza- 
tions and may be copied by other medical institutions. 

Continued on page xv 

January. 1966 xi 



The University of Mar> 

Statement of Cash Receipts and E 



Cash Balances, May 1, 1964: 

Maryland National Bank — Bulletin Fund SI , 788 . 44 

—Alumni P^und 4,433.38 S 6,221.82 



—Savings Account 5,000.00 

Eutaw Savings Bank — Funded Reserve 15,902.75 

Baltimore Federal Savings & Loan Association — 

Student Loan Fund 1 ,007.51 

Cash on hand 'lOO.OO 828,232.08 

Receipts: 

Bulletin Fund — Contributions S 3,216.00 

Alumni Fund: 

Dues $7,518.00 

Annual Banquet 2 , 072 . 00 

Ladies' Activities 114. 75 

Savings Account Interest 176.40 

Oyster Roast 385 . 00 

Miscellaneous 8. 75 

Contribution from OB & Gyn Societies.. 583.23 

Board Meeting Dinner Reimbursements. 57.75 10.915.88 



Funded Reserve — Interest 622 13 

Student Loan Fund : 

Contributions $ 505.00 

Interest 42.76 547.76 15,301.77 



TOTAL CASH TO ACCOUNT FOR §43 533 85 



Expenditures: 

Bulletin Fund: 

Fee— Editor $1 ,000.00 

Bulletin Account — 

University of Maryland 3,500.00 8 4,500.00 

Alumni Fund : 

Salaries $3,970.15 

Fee— Exec. Secy 500 . 00 

Payroll Taxes 152 . 96 

Printing and Office Supplies 267 . 41 

Postage 383.91 

Alumni Day (1964) Expense 5,761.77 

Alumni Day (1965) Expense 85.16 

Board Meeting Luncheon 106. 75 

Auditing 150.00 

Miscellaneous 202.88 

Oyster Roast 570.00 

Contribution to Bulletin 2,000.00 14,150.99 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



cal Aliiinni Association 

or the v^ar ended April 30, 1965 



Cash Balances. April 30, 1965: 

Marvlaml National Bank — Bulletin Fund S 504.44 

— Ai.uMNi Kund 1,114.87 S 1,619.31 

— Savintjs Account 5,176.40 

Eutaw Savings Bank — Funded Reserve 16,524.88 

Baltimore Federal Savins:s & Loan Association — 

Student Loan Fund . . T 1,555.27 

Cash on Hand 7.00 S24,882.86 

TOT.\L CASH ACCOUNTED FOR $43 , 533 . 85 

Student loans of $4,900.30 were outstanding at April 30, 1965. 

Abstract of Minutes of Board of Directors 



A meeting of the Board of Directors was 
held on Oct. 12, 1965. Minutes of the 
previous meeting were approved. The 
Treasurer's Report was given and the bal- 
ance on hand showed the association to be 
in good condition. Treasurer's Report was 
accepted. 

At the previous meeting the president was 
asked to appoint a committee to study what 
involvement the Alumni Association should 
undertake in respect to functions held at 
out-of-town meetings. Dr. Scarborough, 
president, reported that Dr. Supik had ac- 
cepted appointment as chairman of this 
committee. 

The committee to distribute pamphlets 
known as "Research and Educational Ac- 
tivities, Department of Medicine, Univ. of 
Md.," whose chairman is Dr. Lisansky, has 
recommended that a copy of the pamphlet 
be sent to each member of the senior class. 
It was reported they have been sent by the 
Alumni Office. 

A note from Miss Beth Wilson calls our 
attention to the documentaries WBAL-TV 
is preparing. One will be titled, "The 
Anatomy of Medical Education" and wiU 
follow a medical student through his four 
years at the Univ. of Md. The other will 



be a historical documentary about the 
Medical School, centered around Davidge 
Hall and the events it has witnessed. It will 
feature such persons as Dr. Nathan Smith, 
Dr. John Crawford, Dr. Francis Donald- 
son, Dr. Robley Dunglison and other 
physicians who are responsible for the tra- 
ditions of our Medical School. These are 
long-term projects and we are told each 
one may be many months in the making. 

Dr. Sharrett, chairman of the 1966 Mary- 
land Medical Reunion which will coordi- 
nate their activities with Alumni Day to 
be held May 5, 6, and 7, 1966, reported 
that he has talked with Dr. Arlie Mans- 
berger who will be responsible for plan- 
ning the program of the Surgical Society, 
and Dr. Edmund B. Middleton, who will 
be responsible for the plans of the Ob- 
stetrical and Gynecological Society. He 
has yet to learn who will be responsible for 
making plans for the programs of the 
Hospital Medical Society. 

Gifts from Dr. Theodore McCann Davis, 
class of 1914, totaling $510.00 were re- 
ported to have been received and deposited. 

A memo from Arnold Blaustein, class of 
1966, brought forth information that Alpha 
Omega Alpha together with the Student 



Januarv, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Council now sponsors a Medical History 
Society. They plan to hold 3 or 4 meetings 
a year and wondered whether our board 
might have a good suggestion for a speaker. 
It was felt that here is something that 
corresponds with interests of the board. 
Possible speakers for them were suggested. 
At the November 10th meeting of the 
board Dr. Scarborough, president, reported 
the Honor Award Committee, composed of 
Drs. Morris, Clemson and Young, has met 
and sent to him their nominee for the re- 
cipient of the Annual Honor Award and 
Gold Key. Unanimous approval of the 
board to their choice of Dr. T. Nelson 



Carey as recipient of his honor was given 
heartily. Dr. Scarborough will see that Dr. 
Carey is notified officially. 

Dr. Scarborough announced that he has 
contacted Dr. Krantz and requested that he 
accept appointment to the editorial board 
of the Bulletin, to represent the Medical 
Alumni Association. Dr. Krantz has ac- 
cepted the appointment. 

The December meeting of the board will 
be dispensed with and the next meeting will 
be held in January. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Theodore Kardash, 

Secretary 



BaUartVs Genealogy of School 
of Jiedicine a Success 

newly published A UNtVERSMTY MS BORN 
well received by public 

An important historical volume, a genealogy of the School of Medicine, 
relating to the early days of the University of Maryland and its development, 
has been recendy published and is available. 

After more than two years of preparation, Dr. Margaret B. Ballard, an 
emeritus member of the department of obstetrics and gynecology and an 
alumna of the school, has published an excellent history or genealogy of 
the entire University of Maryland which of course includes the School of 
Medicine. 

The Medical Alumni Association is acting as agent for the publication 
and copies of the book may be purchased through the Medical Alumni 
Association at a cost of $7.50 each. The book may be purchased also 
directly through Dr. Margaret B. Ballard, Union, West Virginia. 

Please send me copies of Return this coupon to: 

A UnUersityls Born ^^i^^, ^,„^„i O^^^ 

by Margaret B. Ballard, M.D. 

at $7..50 each University of Maryland 

Name Lombard & Greene Streets 

Address Baltimore, Md. 21201 



Vol. 51. No. 1 



'M 



U. OF M. ALUMNI AT ANNUAL MEETING OF SOUTHERN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 



Twenty-one medical school alumni got 
together in the Grand Ballroom of the Rice 
Hotel on the occasion of the Southern 
Medical Association convention held in 
Houston, Texas the first week in November, 
1965. 

Among those present were Dr. and Mrs. 
F. A. Holden of Baltimore, Dr. C. Martin 
Rhode, Class of 1940 of Augusta, Georgia, 
Dr. and Mrs. H. M. Robinson, of Baltimore, 
Dr. and Mrs. R. C. V. Robinson of Balti- 
more, Dr. and Mrs. L. C. Dobihal, Dr. and 
Mrs. W. P. Beckner, Dr. and Mrs. Jack 
Sugar, Dr. Mortimer Williams, Dr. and Mrs. 
Stuart Brown, Dr. John Wagner, Dr. George 



Peer of the Class of 1938, Dr. James Cianos 
and Dr. and Mrs. John J. Bunting of the 
Class of 1938. The Buntings acted as local 
hosts. 

Dr. R. C. V. Robinson, Councilor for 
Maryland to the Southern Medical Associa- 
tion, brought as his guest this year, Mr. 
Richard M. Susel of the University of Mary- 
land Class of 1966. Mr. Susel represented 
the University of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine at the Convention. Each year the 
Southern Medical Association invites a 
student representative from each medical 
school throughout the South. 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER (Cent.) 

Annually the Medical Alumni Association chooses a worthy alumnus to receive the 
Honor Award. The recipient of the 1966 Honor Award is honored, respected, and 
loved by all of us and I know of no one more worthy to receive it. He is Dr. T. Nelson 
Carey, one of the University's most diligent and loyal supporters for the past 42 years. 
I am sure that all of the alumni will be happy in the choice which has been made and 
will want to greet Dr. Carey on Alumni Day. 

I think it is important to again mention here that the Maryland Medical Reunion 
will be held this year on May 5, 6 and 7, 1966. Please make note that this is ap- 
pro.ximately one month earlier than the usual Annual Alumni Day activities, and the 
date of the meeting coincides with the original Maryland Medical Reunion in 1964 which 
was so successful. We expect between five and six hundred returning alumni to attend, 
so keep the dates in mind and when you receive your preregistration slip mail it in im- 
mediately so that reservations can be made for you for the luncheon and for the alumni 
banquet. We look forward this year to seeing the largest alumni turn-out in the history 
of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 



C. PARKE SCARBOROUGH, M.D. 

President 



January, 1966 



Alumni Day May 6, 1966 



Alumni Reunion Combined 

with Meeting of University 

Hospital Medical Associations 

The president and directors of the Medical 
Alumni Association have announced a three 
day scientific session, on the campus of the 
School of Medicine, May 5, 6 and 7, 1966. 
Events will begin on Thursday, May 5th 
with a reception for all at the Caswell Room 
of the Lord Baltimore Hotel from 8:30 
to 10 P.M. 

Alumni Day will begin officially at 8 a.m. 
May 6, with registration in the Health 
Sciences Library. This will be followed by 
a General Assembly at 8:45 A.M. This 
will be followed by Scientific Sessions and 
the morning will be concluded by the an- 
nual business meeting of the Medical 
Alumni Association which will be held 
in Chemical Hall at 1 1 o'clock concluding 
at noon. 



Dr. T. Nelson Carey to Receive 
Alumni Award and Gold Key 

The Medical Alumni Association has 
nominated Dr. T. Nelson Carey, professor 
of clinical medicine in the school of medi- 
cine, as the recipient of the Alumni Award 
and Gold Key. Dr. Carey, known to two 
generations of medical students and faculty 
and a long time active member of the staff 
of the University Hospital, will receive the 
honor from the hands of Dr. C. Parke 
Scarborough, president of the Medical 
Alumni Association, at appropriate cere- 
monies in Chemical Hall following con- 
clusion of the annual business meeting. 

Dr. Carey is a native of Baltimore and an 
alumnus of Loyola College in the Class of 
1923. He completed his studies for the 
degree of medicine at the University of 




DR. T. NELSON CAREY 

Maryland, graduating in the Class of 1927, 
following which he served his rotating in- 
ternship at the Mercy Hospital, becoming 
chief resident in medicine in 1929. This was 
followed by a post-doctoral fellowship at 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1930. He 
immediately entered active practice of medi- 
cine and teaching, serving also as student 
health physician at the school of medicine. 
His intense application to clinical medicine 
soon became evident and Dr. Carey rapidly 
became known as a brilliant analyst of 
complex medical problems and an able 
consultant. He was obviously at home with 
and expressed delight in the application of 
his talents to the solution of complex 
medical problems. He became the doctor's 
doctor not only as a consultant but as the 
personal physician to many of the staff 
of the school of medicine and other hospitals 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



throughout the city. His progress in the 
department of medicine was steady and dur- 
ing World War II it was Nelson Carey who 
shouldered an overwhelming load of clinical 
teaching, literally serving as the unnamed 
professor of an overloaded and understaffed 
department. This challenge he met despite 
physical handicaps which prevented his 
entry into the military service. 

Following the war he returned to his 
active practice as a consultant but was again 
called to serve as acting head of the de- 
partment of medicine for a year during 
which time Dr. Maurice Pincoffs served as 
a special assistant to the President of the 
University. He then returned to active 
clinical practice. 

He is author of a number of scientific 
publications relating to infectious diseases, 
drug toxicity, and many other important 
contributions. 

During his undergraduate days he was 
the recipient of a Hitchcock Scholarship, the 
Randolph Winslow Scholarship and the 
Faculty Gold Medal for the highest average 
at graduation. He is a member of the 



American Board of Internal Medicine, a 
member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion and the American College of Physicians. 
Trul\', this brilliant man, busy internist, 
consultant, teacher, friend; this keen, 
anaUtical medical mind, exceptionally 
brilliant, unquestionably frank and always 
enthusiastic is the man who on this oc- 
casion of the annual meeting of the Medical 
Alumni Association is selected to receive 
the highest accolade of the association, the 
Gold Medal and Honor Award for outstand- 
ing contributions to medicine and dis- 
tinguished service to mankind. 

Alumni to Present an 
Interesting Evening Program 

Following the conclusion of the business 
meeting and the presentation of the Honor 
Award, a luncheon will be held in the 
gymnasium of the Psychiatric Building be- 
ginning at approximately 12:30 P.M. This 
will be followed by a reception for the 50 
year honor graduates to be held in the 



HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS 

This information is provided for your convenience. Please make your reservations directly 
with the hotel of your choice. 

Number Two Persons Two Persons 

of rooms Single Rate Double Twin Telephone 

Lord Baltimore Hotel 700 $ 9.50-$16.50 $13.00-$19.50 $15.00-$21.OO LE 9-8400 

Baltimore & Hanover Sts. 
Baltimore, Md. 21203 

Sheraton-Belvedere 250 $ 9.85-$13.00 $13.85-$17.00 $17.00-$18.85 MU 5-1000 

Charles & Chase Sts. $14.85 

Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Emerson Hotel 400 $ 8.50-$ 12.00 $13. 00-$ 1 8.00 $13. 00-$ 18.00 MU 5-4400 

Baltimore & Calvert Sts. 
Baltimore, Md. 21203 

Holiday Inn— Downtown 254 $13.00-$14.00 $17.00-$18.00 $17.00-$18.00 685-2500 

Howard & Lombard Sts. 
Baltimore, Md. 21203 



Mohawk Motel 

1701 Russell St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21230 



126 $ 9.50-$1050 $14.50 



$14.50 



837-2400 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Florentine Room of the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel. The annual banquet of the associa- 
tion will be held at the Lord Baltimore at 
6:30 P.M. Friday, May 6, 1966. An at- 
tractive program has been prepared by the 
program committee headed by Dr. John 
O. Sharrett. 

It is expected that copies of the com- 
plete program of the University Hospital 
Medical and Surgical Association as well 
as that of the Alumni Association will be 
sent individually to the membership. 

Those physicians desiring to make a 
reservation for the entire day might find it 
convenient to use the information on page 
xxlx. 



Anniversary Reunion Class 
Captains 

The anniversary reunion classes should 
contact their Class Captains: 
Class of 1916, Henry F. Buettner and 

George A. Bawden, co-captains. 
Class of 1921, Albert Jaffe, Captain. 
Class of 1926, John Askin, and W. C. 

Merkel, co-captains. 
Class of 1931, Emmanuel A. Schimunek, 

Captain. 
Class of 1936, Gibson J. Wells. 
Class of 1941, Pierson M. Checkert. 
Class of 1946, Joseph B. Workman. 
Class of 1951, Wm. G. Esmond. 
Class of 1956, Joseph S. McLaughlin. 
Class of 1961, Michael A. Oldstone, Captain. 



CLASS OF 1916— 50TH ANNIVERSARY 

Richard T. Arnest, M.D. 

Hague, Va. 22469 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 

3812 Greenmount Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

21218 
George A. Bawden, M.D. 
1110 The Broadview, Baltimore, Md. 21210 
Edward H. Bensen, M.D. 
204 E. Joppa, Hampton House Apt., 204, 

Baltimore, Md. 21204 



Eufemio N. Boccanegra-Lopez 

1 Espana Way, Panama, R.P. 00100 

Thomas Latham Bray, M.D. 

Bo.x 576, Plymouth, N. C. 27962 

Charles R. Brooke, M.D. 

VA Hosp., East Orange, N. J. 07019 

B. Bruce Brumbaugh, M.D. 

5609 Main, Elkridge, Md. 21227 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D. 

5005 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

~> 1229 
Honorio F. Carrasquillo, M.D. 
47 Victor Pradera, Madrid, Spain 00100 
Michael Edward Cavallo, M.D. 
265 Lafayette St., N. Y., N. Y. 10012 
James Jennings Chandler, M.D. 
132 N. Washington St., Sumter, S. C. 29150 
Lucien Romeo Chaput, M.D. 
3 Washington Sq., Haverhill, Mass. 01830 
Wm. J. Dillon, M.D. 
162 Maple St. 
Springfield, Mass. 01105 
Israel J. Feinglos, M.D. 
2002 E. Pratt St., Baltimore, Md. 21231 
Wm. T. Ferneyhough, M.D. 
2021/2 South Scales, Reidsville, N. C. 27320 
Wm. H. Flynn, M.D. 
126 Main St., Bristol, Conn. 06010 
Raymond K. Foxwell, M.D. 
4103 N. 4th, Arlington, Va. 22203 
Fred T. Foard, M.D. 
701 Beaver Dam Rd., Raleigh, N. C. 27607 

Harry Goldmann, M.D. 

7121 Pk. Hghts. Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21215 

Bowers Hewitt Growt, M.D. 

Med. Ctr., Addison, Mich. 49220 

Humphrey W. Gvv^nn, M.D. 

320 N. Magnolia, Orlando, Fla. 32802 

John Roy Hege, M.D. 

905 Martin Drive, Concord, N. C. 28025 

Charles H. Lupton, M.D. 

Box 9658, Norfolk, Va. 23505 

George McLean, M.D. 

Med. Arts Bldg., Bahimore, Md. 20101 

Francis J. Mejias, M.D. 

552 Miramar Ave. 

Santurce, P.R. 00908 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMS'I ASSOCIATION SECTION 



A. B. Nevling, M.D. 

P.O. Box 558, Rochester, Minn. 55902 

Frank Peter Nicholson, M.D. 

301 Boston Blvd., Sea Girt, N. J. 08750 

Robert H. Noell, M.D. 

207 Academy St., Roxboro, N. C. 27573 

Vincent J. Oddo, M.D. 

65 S. Hill Dr., Cranston, R. I. 02910 

Gonzaio O'Neill, M.D. 

410 Prospect St., E. Orange, N. J. 07017 

Guy R. Post, M.D. 

1 1 16 S. Park Dr., Fairmount, W. Va. 26554 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

104 W. Madison St., Baltimore, Md. 20101 

Francis F. Ruzicka, M.D. 

800 N. Patterson Pk., Baltimore, Md. 21224 

Wilbur Fiske Shirkey, Jr., M.D. 

301 Atlas Bldg., Charleston, W. Va. 25301 

Harold Milton Stein, M.D. 

227 W. Broadway, Paterson, N. J. 07522 

Carl M. Van Poole, M.D. 

Mt. Airy, Md. 21771 

Maurice C. Wentz, M.D. 

455 W. Market St., York, Pa. 17404 

Wm. Frederick Williams, M.D. 

122 S. Center St., Cumberland, Md. 21502 



CLASS OF 1921— 45TH ANNIVERSARY 

Bruce Barnes, M.D. 

328 High St., Seaford, Del. 19973 

Carl Fisher Benson, M.D. 
5111 York Rd., Balto., Md. 

John R. Bernardo, M.D. 

198 High St., Bristol, R. I. 02809 

Vincent Bonfiglia, M.D. 

2252 S. Bronson, Los Angeles, Calif. 90018 

Earl E. Broadrup, M.D. 

202 Virginia Ave., Cumberland, Md. 21503 

Oscar Costa-Mandry, M.D. 

Box 1730 Hato Rey, San Juan, P. R. 00919 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D. 

5812 Locklea Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21209 

Herman J. Dorf, M.D. 

7404 Liberty Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21207 



Charles Frederick Fisher, M.D. 

321 W. Main St., Clarksburg, W. Va. 26301 

Leon Freedom, M.D. 

1031 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

John Willis Guyton, M.D. 

3961 Greenmount Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
21218 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. 

130 Slade Ave., Apt. 1202, Baltimore, Md. 
21208 

George R. Joyner, M.D. 

133 Chestnut St., Suffolk, Va. 23434 

Arley Von McCoy, M.D. 

2207 National Rd., Wheeling, W. Va. 26002 

Thomas Rutter O'Rourk, M.D. 

104 W. Madison St., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Frank Anthony Pacienza, M.D. 

Washington Apt., 700 N. Charles St., Balti- 
more, Md. 21201 

Moses Paulson, M.D. 

11 E. Chase St., Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Edgar Allen Poe Peters, M.D. 

394 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 07304 

Harold C. Pillsbury, M.D. 

1800 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D. 

2200 E. Madison St., Baltimore, Md. 21205 

N. Alfredo Quinones, M.D. 

717 Paz St., Santurce, P. R. 00907 

Francis Albert Reynolds, M.D. 

43 Cottage St., Athol, Mass. 01331 

Harold A. Romilly, M.D. 

16701 Seneca Ave., Lakewood, Ohio 44107 

Fred C. Sabin, M.D. 

28 Salisbury, Little Falls, N. Y. 13365 

Solomon Sherman, M.D. 

2424 Eutaw PL, Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Felix S. Shubert, M.D. 

3926 State St., Erie, Pa. 16508 

John Valentine Szczerbicki, M.D. 

1802 Eastern Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21231 

Louis M. Timko, M.D. 

3015 Ripley Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44120 

Herman E. Wagner, M.D. 

Box 824, Atlantic City, N. J. 08404 

Wm. Ferdinand Weinkauf, M.D. 

Corunna, Mich. 48817 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



George Edward Wells, M.D. 

4100 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

21229 
Mortimer Harry Williams, M.D. 
711 Med. Arts Bldg., Roanoke, Va. 24011 



CLASS OF 1926— 40TH ANNIVERSARY 

Harry Anker, M.D. 

20569 California St., Woodland Hills, Calif. 

91364 
John Askin, M.D. 
1401 Reisterstown Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

21208 
Margaret B. Ballard, M.D. 
Old Hundred, Union, West Va. 24983 
Jack H. Beachley, M.D. 
221 W. Washington, Hagerstown, Md. 

21740 
Warren Elwood Calvin, M.D. 
1215 4th Ave., Seattle, Wash. 98101 
Antonio F. D'Angelo, M.D. 
99 State St., Bristol, R. I. 02809 
Henry DeVincentis, M.D. 
285 Henry St., Orange, N. J. 07050 
Hillel Elias Diamond, M.D. 
1777 Grand Concourse, Bronx, N. Y. 10453 
Frank R. DiPaula, M.D. 
204 Court St., Binghamton, N. Y. 13901 
Newman Houghton Dyer, M.D. 
1800 Washington St., E., Charleston, W. Va. 

25311 
Paul Eanet, M.D. 
6727 16th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

20012 
Charles William Edmonds, M.D. 
614 Hastings Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21204 
Julian C. Elliott, M.D. 
Box 315, Oxford, N. C. 27565 
Harold Herman Freedman, M.D. 
63 W. Main St., Freehold, N. J. 07728 
Arthur N. Freuder, M.D. 
365 Parkside Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11226 
Isadore E. Gerber, M. D. 
1095 Park Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10028 
David M. Helfond, M.D. 
81-27 88th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11227 



Nevins B. Hendrix, M.D. 

122 S. Maple Ave., Martinsburg, W. Va. 

25401 
Calvin Hyman, M.D. 
2500 Eutaw PI., Bahimore, Md. 21217 
Jacob R. Jensen, M.D. 
The Fenwick Apt., 303, 6101 Loch Raven 

Blvd., Baltimore, Md. 21212 
Philip Johnson, M.D. 
Deveny Bldg., Fairmont, W. Va. 26554 
Meyer S. Jolson, M.D. 
531 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 41011 
Alphonse J. Knapp, M.D. 
208 Little Bldg., E. Liverpool, Ohio 43920 
John A. Krosnoff, M.D. 
909 Main St., Bentleyville, Pa. 15314 
Louis T. Lavy, M.D. 

1844 W. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21217 
Hyman Edmund Levin, M.D. 
3640 Fords Lane, Baltimore, Md. 21215 
L Leonard Levin, M.D. 
322 Broadway Bldg., Lorain, Ohio 44052 
Joseph Levin, M.D. 
831 S. 13th St., Newark, N. J. 07108 
Wm. F. E. Loftin, M.D. (Capt, USN ret'd.) 
410 Willow St., Marion N. C. 28752 
Lloyd U. Lumpkin, M.D. 
918 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

33301 
Walter C. Merkel, M.D. 
Union Mem. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21218 
Harry G. Miller, M.D. 
2060 Anthony Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 10457 

Albert F. Moriconi, M.D. 

438 Hamilton Ave., Trenton, N. J. 08609 

Wm. C. Polsue, M.D. 

Med. Arts Bldg., Charleston, W. Va. 25301 

Arthur Rattenni, M.D. 

1011 Smith Ave., Providence, R. I. 02908 

Albert A. Rosenberg, M.D. 

515 Sinclair St., McKeesport, Pa. 15132 

Abraham S. Rothberg, M.D. 

1 10 E. 90th St., N. Y., N. Y. 10028 

David Sashin, M.D. 

25 West 81st St., N. Y., N. Y. 10024 

Paul Schenker, M.D. 

2424 Eutaw PL, Baltimore, Md. 21217 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



David Schneider, M.D. 

7813 Wise Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21222 

William Schuman, M.D. 

1701 Eutaw PI., Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Ralph A. Schwartz, M.D. 

101 Conant St., Hillside, N. J. 07205 

-Arthur Anthony Scullion, M.D. 

47 River\ie\v Ave., Cliffside Pk., N. J. 07010 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D. 

P.O. Box 114, Front Royal, Va. 22630 

Frank Spano, M.D. 

320 47th St., Union City, N. J. 07087 

Mourice L. Teitelbaum, M.D. 

863 Eastern Pkwy.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 11213 

Max Trubeck, M.D. 

121 E. 60th St., N. Y., N. Y.' 10022 

Samuel \\'einstein, M.D. 

888 Eastern Pkv,y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11213 

Louis L. Weiss, M.D. 

202 E. 51st St.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 11203 

Louis J. Weseley, M.D. 

600 E. ISth St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11226 

Guy Lorraine Whicker. M.D. 

301 Prof. Bldg., Kannapolis, N. C. 28081 

Samuel B. Wolfe, M.D. 

2710 Bartol St., Baltimore, Md. 21209 



CL.ASS OF 19.31— .3.5TH ANNIVERSARY 

Philip Adalman, M.D. 

87-10 37th Ave., Flushing, N. Y. 11372 

David H. Andrew, M.D. 

6905 Dunmanway, Baltimore, Md. 21222 

Thomas M. Arnett, M.D. 
2121 Pennsylvania, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
20037 

Paul C. Barton, M.D. 

67 Union St., Worcester, Mass. 01608 

Eugene Irving Baumgartner, M.D. 
226 E. Alder St., Oakland, Md. 21550 

H. I. Berman, M.D. 

VA Hospital, Mellwood Ave. & Zorn Ave., 
Louisville, Ky. 40202 

Wm. C. Boggs, M.D. 

1325 Chaplihe St., Wheeling, W. Va. 26003 



Arthur T. Brice, M.D. 

JelTerson, Md. 21755 

Bernard Brill. M.D. 

24 8th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11217 

John Brill, M.D. 

910 N. 12th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19123 

Melvin B. Davis, M.D. 

6800 Mornington Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21222 

Joseph Francis Drenga, M.D. 

1018 Green Acre Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21204 

J. Wesley Edel, M.D. 

4502 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 21210 

David S. Eisenberg, M.D. 

72 South St., Auburn, N. Y. 13021 

Samuel A. Feldman, M.D. 

885 Park Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10021 

Arthur Stanley Feuer, M.D. 

3099 Brighton 6th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

11235 
Isadore K. Grossman, M. D. 
3409 Rosedale Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21215 
Donald B. Grove, M.D. 
Med. Bldg., Cumberland, Md. 21501 
Rachel K. Gundry, M.D. 
5002 Frederick Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21229 
Marvin Ray Hannum, M.D. 
54 W. Main St., Milan, Mich. 48160 
Jos. W. Harris, M.D. 
R.D. 1-8 Cecelia Rd., E. Syracuse, N. Y. 

13057 
Raymond Fred'k. Helfrich, M.D. 
1120 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 
Reuben Hoffman, M.D. 
846 W. 36th St., Baltimore, Md. 21211 
Mark B. Hollander, M.D. 
836 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
Kent Maidlow Hornbrook, M.D. 
New Martinsville, W. Va. 26155 
Samuel M. Jacobson, M.D. 
50 Pershing St., Cumberland, Md. 21502 

Frank H. Jaklitsch, M.D. 
1048 Old Country Rd., Westbury, L. I., 
N. Y. 11590 

Carl D. F. Jensen, M.D. 

1601 16th Ave., Seattle, Wash. 98122 

Page Covington Jett, M.D. 
Prince Frederick, Md. 20678 



Januarx, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Arthur F. Jones, M.D. 

Garrett Co. Health Dept., Oakland, Md. 
21550 

Abraham Karger, M.D. 

2015 Grand Concourse, Bronx, N. Y. 10453 

Max Kaufman, M.D. 

21-51 75th St., Flushing, N. Y. 11372 

Walter J. Keefe, M.D. 

350 Farmington Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
06105 

John F. Kilgus, Jr., M.D. 

State Office Bldg., 165 Capitol Ave., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 06115 

Walter Kohn, M.D. 

102 E. Fort Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21230 

Jerome L. Krieger, M.D. 

4024 6th Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11232 

Harry Lachman, M.D. 

101 California Ave., Santa Monica, Calif. 
90403 

Vernon Langeluttig, M.D. 

Mo. St. Sanatorium, Mt. Vernon, Mo. 65712 

Alston Gordon Lanham, M.D. 

Ronceverte, W. Va. 24970 

Philip Lerner, M.D. 

2 E. Read St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Sidney Starr Leshine, M.D. 

114-21 38th Ave., Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 
11354 

David R. Levine, M.D. 

488 E. 18th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1 1226 

Thomas Adrian Martin, M.D. 

1300 Brookside Dr., Raleigh, N. C. 27604 

John F. Masterson, M.D. 

98 Myrtle Ave., Irvington, N. J. 07111 

Leo M. Meyer, M.D. 

Long Island Jewish Hosp. — Triboro Hosp., 
82-68 164th St., Jamaica, N. Y. 11432 

Clarence F. Morrison, M.D. 

Sutton, W. Va. 26601 

Waldo B. Moyers, M.D. 

3503 Perry St., Mt. Rainier, Md. 20822 

Richard L. Murphy, M.D. 

922 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 03101 

Leo S. Palitz, M.D. 

31 W. 10thSt.,N. Y., N. Y. 10011 

Manuel Rodriquez-Ema. M.D. 

421 Tapia St., Santurce, P. R. 00915 



Robert F. Rohm, M.D. 

G7 MC Bldg., 1501 Locust St.. Pittsburgh, 

Pa. 15219 
Benjamin B. Rosenberg, M.D. 
1070 E. New York Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

11212 
John K. Rozum, M.D. 
4100 Red Rd., Miami. Fla. 33155 
Emanuel A. Schimunek, M.D. 
842 So. East Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21224 
Wm. Seabold, M.D. 

134 W. Lanvale Dr., Baltimore, Md. 21217 
Herman Harold Seidman, M.D. 
760 Hunts Pt. Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 10474 
Harry S. Shelley, M.D. 
Vet. Adm. Hosp., Nashville, Tenn. 37203 
Arthur G. Siwinski, M.D. 
836 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
Michael J. Skovron, M.D. 
716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 16501 
Marvin L. Slate, M.D. 
204 Boulevard, High Point, N. C. 27262 
Alexander SlavcofT, M.D. 
701 N. 2nd St., Harirsburg, Pa. 17102 
Solomon Smith, M.D. 
610 Gist Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21215 
Russell A. Stevens, M.D. 
158 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18701 
Robert B. Taylor, M.D. 
700 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
W. Alfred Van Ormer, M.D. 
Med. Bldg., 122 S. Centre St., Cumberland, 

Md. 21502 
Harold C. Whims, M.D. 
County Health Dept., Ashboro, N. C. 27203 
Henry Wigderson, M.D. 
162-05 89th St., Jamaica, N. Y. 11432 



CL.\SS OF 1936— 30TH ANNIVERSARY 

Abraham Louis Batalion, M.D. 
301 Fair St., Middlebourne, W. Va. 26149 
Milton Bernstein, M.D. 
3202 Taney Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21215 
E. Roland Bieren, M.D. 
6416 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church, Va. 
22044 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMXI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Dan George Bierer, M.D. 

II Gransburg St., Delniont, Pa. 15626 

Harry C. Bowie, M.D. 

926 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Irving Burka, M.D. 

4400 Conn. Ave., N.W., Washington. D. C. 

20008 
Harold H. Burns, M.D. 
8106 Harford Rd., Baltimore. Md. 21234 
Jerome K.. Burton, M.D. 
209 Main, Boise, Idaho 83702 
Joseph E. Bush, M.D. 
1 17 S. Main St., Hampstead, Md. 21074 
George J. Coplin, M.D. 
528 E. Jersey St., Elizabeth, N. J. 07206 
Vladimir F. Ctibor, M.D. 
School St., Califon, N. J. 07830 
Leo M. Curtis, M.D. 

8507 Lynwood PI., Chevy Chase, Md. 20015 
Nachman Davidson, M.D. 
6100 Pk. Hgts. Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21215 
George H. Davis, M.D. 
404 Hollen Rd.. Baltimore, Md. 21212 

Se\mour R. Doehl, M.D. 

230 W. Jersey St., Elizabeth, N. J. 07202 

Stuart D. Dittmar, M.D. 
473 Lincoln Way. E. Chambersburg, Pa. 
17201 

Darius McC. Dixon, M.D. 

5504 Normandy PI., Baltimore, Md. 21210 

Joseph Drozd, M.D. 

240 S. Ann St., Baltimore, Md. 21231 

Jerome Feldman, M.D. 

20094 Mission Blvd., Hayward, Calif. 94541 

Lester M. Fox, M.D. 

104-14 85th Ave., Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 
11418 

Michael G. Frich, M.D. 

482 Carmel Pkwy., Corpus Christi, Texas 

Marion H. Gillis, Jr., M.D. 

206 Walnut St., Salisbury, Md. 21801 

Harry S. Gimbel, M.D. 
4605 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
21229 

Jesse W. Gordner, Jr., M.D. 

410 Ferry St., Danville, Pa. 17821 



Philip O. Gregory, M.D. 

8 Commercial St., Boothbay Harbor, Maine 

04538 
Wm. Greifinger, M.D. 
31 Lincoln Park, Newark, N.J. 07102 
Jaye J. Grollman, M.D. 
2026 R St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20009 
Benjamin Isaacs, M.D. 

1261 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
21212 

C. Henry Jones, M.D. 

707 N. Rebecca Ave., Scranton, Pa. 18504 
Emory Ellsworth Jones, Jr., M.D. 
Box 765, Mt. Hope, W. Va. 25880 
Walter E. Karfgin, M.D. 
1212 Southview Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21212 
Saul Karpel, M.D. 
190 Montauk Ave., New London, Conn. 

06320 
Norman Kleiman, M.D. 
3803 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

21229 
Howard T. Knobloch, M.D. 
1102 Columbus Ave., Bay City, Michigan 

48708 
Louis J. Kolodner. M.D. 
2502 Eutaw PL, Baltimore, Md. 21217 
Raymond J. Lipkin, M.D. 
Vet. Adm. Hosp., Little Rock, Ark. 72206 
Robert M. Lowman, M.D. 
789 Howard Ave., New Haven, Conn. 06504 
Grant Lund, M.D. 

201 N. 8th St., Las Vegas, Nev. 89101 
W. Kenneth Mansfield, M.D. 
2 E. Read St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 
Louis Robert Maser, M.D. 
2724 Smith Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21209 
Hector C. McKnew, Jr., M.D. 
20 E. Locust St., Newark, Ohio 43055 

Eugene McNinch, M.D. 

126 Walker Rd., Dover, Del. 19901 

James Blessing Moran, M.D. 

66 Fruit Hill Ave., Providence, R. I. 02909 

James Patrick Moran, M.D. 
150AdlerSt.,Coronado, Calif. 92118 

Benjamin B. Moses, M.D. 

448 N. Luzerne Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21224 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Joseph R. Myerovitz, M.D. 

5145 Pk. Hgts. Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21215 

Wm. Myers, M.D. 

1230 Monterey St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15212 

Hansford Dorsey Nester, M.D. 

314 E. Grand Ave., Eau Claire, Wise. 54701 

Thomas A. Nester, M.D. 

337 Main St., Wakefield, R. I. 02879 

Morris J. Nicholson, M.D. 

25 Bonad Rd., West Newton, Mass. 02165 

Sigmund Roman Nowak, M.D. 

408 S. Patterson Pk. Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

21231 
Richard Heber Pembroke, Jr., M.D. 
209 E. Biddle St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 
Salvatore Dante Pentecost, M.D. 
75 Holton La., Essex Falls, N. J. 07021 
Carl Pigman, M.D. 
Box 390, Whitesburg, Ky. 41858 
Samuel Marvin Reichel, M.D. 
6020 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

55419 
Gregory N. Rochlin, M.D. 
200 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138 
Ralph B. Roseman, M.D. 
4164 N. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19140 
Victor Rosenthal, M.D. 
324 Merrick Ave., Merrick, N. Y. 11566 
James D. Royster, M.D. 
Elm St., Benson, N. C. 27504 
George Peter Schmieler, M.D. 
615 1st St., Canonsburg, Pa. 15317 
George D. Selby, M.D. 
1835 Eye St., N.W., Suite 201, Washington, 

D. C. 20006 

Lawrence Joseph Shimanek, M.D. 

3711 Falls Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21211 

Cyril Solomon, M.D. 

109 E. 61st St., New York, N. Y. 10021 

Matthew Serin, M.D. 

611 E. Poplar, Stockton, Calif. 95202 

David M. Spain, M.D. 

3 Tyler Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 10585 

Milton Honore Stapen, M.D. 

760 Bushwick Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11221 

Joseph L. Stecher, M.D. 

908 Delaney St., Orlando, Fla. 32806 



Samuel Steinberg, M.D. 

2822 N. 5th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19133 

Morris H. Stern, M.D. 

471 Clifton Ave., Clifton, N. L 07011 

Stuart Dos Passes Sunday, M.D. 

201 E. 33rd St., Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Isaac Terr, M.D. 

1037 7th St., Las Vegas, N. M. 87701 

Anthony Jos. Thomas, M.D. 

4600 York Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21212 

Lawrence M. Tierney, M.D. 

246 Elm St., West Haven, Conn. 06516 

Baxter Suttles Troutman, M.D. 

Dula Hosp., Lenoir, N. C. 28645 

George Louis Vieweg, Jr., M.D. 

3 1 Pleasant Dr., Wheeling, W. Va. 26003 

Daniel George Wehner, M.D. 

101 W. Read St., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Jacob J. Weinstein, M.D. 

1712 Eye St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

20006 
Gibson J. Wells, M.D. 

5618 St. Albans Way, Baltimore, Md. 21212 
Daniel Wilfson, Jr., M.D. 
5721 Pk. Hgts. Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21213 
Arthur G. Wilkinson, M.D. 
1 1 1 Sherman Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

06511 
C. Vernon Williamson, M.D. 
Prof. Arts BIdg., 5550 Balto. Nat'l. Pike, 

Baltimore, Md. 21228 

Nathan Wolf, M.D. 

126 Main St., Brawley, Calif. 92227 

Charles Sidney Yavelow, M.D. 

105 Stevens Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 10330 

Joseph G. Zimring, M.D. 
222 Riverside Blvd., Long Beach, N. Y. 
11561 



CLASS OF 1941— 25TH ANNIVERSARY 

Aurora F. Alberti, M.D. 
4740 Chevy Chase Dr., Chevy Chase, Md. 
20015 

Fred Alexander, M.D. 

Pennsylvania Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. 19107 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Jerome C. Arnett, M.D. 

Rowlesburg, W. Va. 26425 

Charles P. Barnett, M.D. 

798 Ave. E., Riverside. Pa. 17868 

Julius Culpepper Brooks, M.D. 

546 McCallie Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

37402 
Wm. Ross Bundick, M.D. 
940 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
John M. Carter, M.D. 

1216 6th Ave., Huntington, W. Va, 25701 
Pierson M. Checket, M.D. 
4024 Essex Rd.. Baltimore, Md. 21207 
Carlos M. Chiques. M.D. 
560 Trigo St., Miramar, Santurce, P. R. 

00907 
Charles Edgar Cloninger, M.D. 
305 1st St. E., Conover, N. C. 28613 
Richard A. Conlen, M.D. 
640 Farragut Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 08033 
Leroy G. Cooper, M.D. 
827 S. George St., York, Pa. 17403 
Joseph Vincent Crecca, M.D. 
551 Berkeley Ave., Orange, N. J. 07050 
Gene A. Croce, M.D. 

194 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 02906 
Dwight P. Cruikshank, III, M.D. 
1911 Dudley Ave., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

26102 
John McC. Culler, M.D. 
15 E. 2nd St., Frederick, Md. 21701 
Miguel L. DeVincentis, M.D. 
1202 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 
Smilo Diez-Gutierrez, M.D. 
6 Pedro Arroyo St., Orocovis, P. R. 00720 
Anthony DiPaula, M.D. 
5301 Harford Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21214 

John Esnard, M.D. 

c/o NACC Bo.x 9, APO 63, San Francisco, 
Calif. 96263 

Edward L. Frey, Jr., M.D. 
4605 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
21229 

Julius Gelber, M.D. 

1514 Union St., Schenectady, N. Y. 12309 

Wm. Goodman, M.D. 

1334 Sulphur' Sp. Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21227 



Theodore Joseph Graziano, M.D. 

4019 Alameda Blvd., Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Thomas A. Hcdrick, M.D. 

338 Lincoln St., Johnstown, Pa. 15901 

Newton W. Hershner, Jr., M.D. 

211 W. Main St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 17055 

Asher Hollander, M.D. 

3427 Johnson St., Hollywood, Fla. 33021 

Lorman L. Hoopes, M.D. 

315 E. MainSt., Minot, N. Dak. 58701 

Pearl Huffman Scholz, M.D. 

1 1 E. Chase St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

James Stanley Hunter, Jr., M.D. 

1133 College Ave., Manhattan, Kansas 

66502 
Vita R. Jaffe, M.D. 
5079 Bradley Blvd., Chevy Chase, Md. 

20015 
Norval Foard Kemp, M.D. 
106 Sherman PI., Jersey City, N. J. 07307 
Kenneth Krulevitz, M.D. 
3306 Claran Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21215 
Frank E. Lach, M.D. 

1 8 1 Edwards St., New Haven, Conn. 065 1 1 
Franklin Leslie, M.D. 
302 E. 33rd St., Baltimore, Md. 21218 
Jose S. Licha, M.D. 
Doctors Hosp., Stop 20, San Juan, P. R. 

00915 
Thomas F. Lusby, M.D. 
824 Buckingham Rd., Cumberland, Md. 

21502 
Raymond Malouf, M.D. 
52 N. 1st East St., Logan, Utah 84321 
Jacob B. Mandel, M.D. 
HON. Y. Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11216 

Wm. A. Mitchell, M.D. 

1 107 Ellis Ave., Lufkin, Texas 75901 

Jose G. Molinari, M.D. 
16 Palo Seco Rd., Bay View, Catano, P. R. 
00632 

Margaret E. Morgan, M.D. 

3400 N. Meridian, Indianapolis, Ind. 46208 

Felix R. Morris, M.D. 

953 E. Main St., Bridgeport, Conn. 06608 

Wm. Herbert Morrison, M.D. 

3 Kinship Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21222 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



James J. Nolan, M.D. 

416 Kensington Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21229 

Miguel Novoa-Caballero, M.D. 

18 Int. Rumirea St., Caguas, P. R. 00625 

Ydalia Ortiz-Freeman, M.D. 

Univ. of P. R., Sch. of Med., San Juan, 

P. R. 00931 
Margaret Virginia Palmer, M.D. 
136 S. Washington St., Easton, Md. 21601 
Benjamin Pasamanick, M.D. 
410 W. 10th Ave., Columbus, O. 43210 
Thompson Pearcy, M.D. 
317 Atlas Bldg., Charleston, W. Va. 25301 
Joshua M. Perman, M.D. 
135 Central Prk. West, N. Y., N. Y. 10023 
Irene Phrydas, M.D. 
Emory Univ. Hosp., Atlanta, Ga. 30322 
Charles E. Pruitt, M.D. 
25 Petersville Rd., Brunswick, Md. 21716 
Francis S. Renna, M.D. 
20 Morris Ave., Morristovra, N. J. 07960 
Walter Jones Revell, M.D. 
Box 3, Louisville, Ga. 30434 
Charles Richardson, Jr., M.D. 
908 S. Main St., Bel Air, Md. 21014 
Marion B. Richmond, M.D. 
321 1 Wake Dr., Kensington, Md. 20795 
Christian F. Richter, M.D. 
1001 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 
Clyde A. Rossberg, M.D. 
2436 Washington Blvd., Baltimore, Md. 

21230 
Jonas S. Rosenberg, M.D. 
1575 Gilpin St., Denver, Colo. 80218 
Robert B. Sasscer, M.D. 
Box 2150, Upper Marlboro, Md. 20870 
Wm. Hamilton Sawyer, Jr., M.D. 
126 Maiden Choice La., Baltimore, Md. 

21228 

John A. Scholl, M.D. 

36 Hurley St., Belmont, Mass. 02178 

Stanley E. Schwartz, M.D. 

Dept. of Surgery, Kings Bridge VA Hosp., 

130 W. Kings Bridge Rd., Bronx, N. Y. 

10468 
Edwin L. Seigman, M.D. 
Box 105 Bunn Dr., Rocky Mt., N. C. 27802 



Edward P. Shannon, M.D. 

714 Knoll Dr., San Carlos, Calif. 94070 

Joseph C. Sheehan, M.D. 

208 West St., Annapolis, Md. 21401 

Elizabeth Brown Sherrill, M.D. 

Beaver Dam Rd., Cockeysville, Md. 21030 

Thomas C. Sims, M.D. 

Longacre Med. Ctr., Longacre, W. Va. 

25127 
Benedict Skitarelic, M.D. 
R. D. #9, Cumberland, Md. 21502 
Tracy N. Spenser, Jr., M.D. 
144 7th Ave., S. Charleston, W. Va. 25303 
John S. Stevens, M.D. 
1438 Park Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 06604 
Camille Mary Stonehille, M.D. 
2823 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, 111. 60201 
Webster M. Strayer, Jr., M.D. 
2616 W. 102nd St., Inglewood, Calif. 90303 
Raymond K. Thompson, M.D. 
1125 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 
Richard W. Trevaskis, Jr., M.D. 
220 Balto. Ave., Cumberland, Md. 21502 
George J. Ulrich, M.D. 
527 San Ysidro Rd., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

93103 
Edmund J. Virusky, M.D. 
413N. MainSt.,Baxley, Ga. 31513 
James H. Walker, M.D. 
1323 Quarrier St., E. Charleston, W. Va. 

25301 
Lester Aubrey Wall, Jr., M.D. 
4407 Underwood Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21218 
Dayton O. Watkins, M.D. 
5318 Annapolis Rd., Bladensburg, Md. 

20710 

John B. Wells, Jr., M.D. 
306 Cedarcroft Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21212 
Edwin F. Wilson, M.D. 
235 Osborne Ave., Riverhead, L. I., N. Y. 
11901 

Kazuo Yanagisawa, M.D. 

216E. 50thSt.,N. Y., N. Y. 10022 

John David Young, Jr., M.D. 

University Hosp. 21201 

Kenneth L. Zierler, M.D. 

601 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 21205 



Vol. 51. No. 1 



ALU MM ASSOCIATION SECTION 



CLASS OF 1946— 20TH ANNIVERSARY 

Jesse H. Arnold, Jr., M.D. 

400 Glenwood St., Kinston. N. C. 28501 

Charles H. Audet, Jr., M.D. 

3 2nd Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 06710 

Jeanne Dorothy Audet, M.D. 

Waterbury Rehab. Ctr., Waterbury, Conn. 

06708 
Robert Jos. Audet, M.D. 
132 E. Mountain, Waterbury, Conn. 06706 
Wm. J. Bannen, M.D. 
Forest Park, Simpsonville, S. C. 29681 
Robert E. Bauer, M.D. 
Meridian Med. Bldg., 1680 Meridian Ave., 

Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 
Walter J. Benavent, M.D. 
Box 1854, Hato Rey, San Juan, P.R. 00919 
Alfred Dement Bonifant, M.D. 
Sandy Point, Md. 20860 
Eli M. Brown, M.D. 
13123 La Salle, Huntington Woods, Mich. 

48070 
Robert B. Brown, M.D. 
120 E. Main St., Romney, W. Va. 26757 
Louise P. Buckner, M.D. 
R.D. # 2, Box 309 Altamont, N. Y. 12009 
Harold V. Cano, M.D. 
391 Main St., Box 436, Spotswood, N. J. 

08884 

Wm. F. Carr, M.D. 

410 N. 2nd St., Harrisburg, Pa. 17101 

Thomas W. Christopher, M.D. 

46 Church St., Dedham, Mass. 02026 

Sidney Clyman, M.D. 

105 Stevens Ave., Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 10550 

Francis I. Codd, M.D. 

P.O. Box 627, Severna Pk., Maryland 21 146 

Jerome Cohn, M.D. 

1900 S. Atlantic Blvd., Montery Pk., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 90022 

Thomas B. Connor, M.D. 

Univ. Hosp., Lombard & Greene Sts., Balti- 
more, Md. 21201 

Richard J. Cross, M.D. 

104 W. Madison St., Baltimore, Md. 21201 



Waiter L. Crouch, M.D. 

1 002 Grace St., Wilmington, N.C. 28401 

Jose Diaz-Carazo, M.D. 

1475 Wilson Ave., Santurce, P. R. 00907 

Joseph D'Antonio, M.D. 

Church Home & Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 

21231 
Guy K. Driggs, M.D. 

10335 N. Zangs Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75208 
Vincent Offley Eareckson, Jr., M.D. 
129 N.Washington St., Easton, Md. 21601 
Herman L. Earnhardt, Jr., M.D. 
2301 Fall Hill Ave., Fredericksburg, Va. 

22401 
James Lee Eavey, M.D. 
1004 Beverly Rd., Rockledge, Fla. 32955 
Jos. S. Fischer, M.D. 
115 Redwood Dr., Roslyn, N. Y. 11576 
Paul E. Frye, M.D. 
1244 Sunsetview Dr., Akron, Ohio 44313 

Samuel David Gaby, M.D. 

2415 Diana Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21209 

John R. Gamble, Jr., M.D. 

Box 250, Lincolnton, N. C. 28092 

Wm. D. Gentry, Jr., M.D. 

Med. Arts Bldg., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

James J. Gerlach, M.D. 

4 E. Eager St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Abraham A. Goetz, M.D. 

125 South Dr., Mountain View, Calif. 94040 

H. Wm. Gray, M.D. 

4501 Connecticut, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
20008 

Duane L. Greenfield, M.D. 

513 S. Main, Sioux Falls, S. D. 57102 

Leland Jay Hansen, M.D. 
Suite 3, 3875 Jackson St., Riverside, Calif. 
92503 

Henry C. Hardin, Jr., M.D. 

25 S.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Fla. 33131 

John B. Harley, M.D. 

Box 19, Rt. # 4, Morgan town, W. Va. 
26501 

Charles W. Hawkins, M.D. 
744 McCallie Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
37402 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Charles A. Hefner, M.D. 

2037 Crystal Sp. Ave., S.W., Roanoke, Va. 

24014 
Edwin O. Hendrickson, III, M.D. 
Box 546, Truckee, Calif. 95734 
Harry E. Hill, M.D. 

8819 Reseda Blvd., Northridge, Calif. 91325 
J. Poulson Hunter, M.D. 
2131 E. 21st S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84109 
Nathan B. Hyman, M.D. 
6609 Reisterstown Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

21215 
E. R. Jennings, M.D. 

4029 Riverside Dr., Brunswick, Ga. 31520 
Harry G. R. Knapp, M.D. 
2650 Thirteenth St., Boulder, Colo. 80302 

Lawrence J. Knox, M.D. 
RFD 6, Olney, 111. 62450 
J. Howard Latimer, M.D. 
3574 E. Cliff Dr., Salt Lake City, Utah 
84117 

Herbert J. Levickas, M.D. 
1073 Maiden Choice La., Baltimore, Md. 
21229 

Allan Macht, M.D. 

3414 Janellen Dr., Baltimore, Md. 21208 
L. T. Maholick, M.D. 

1327 Warren Wms. Rd., Columbus, Ga. 
31901 

Ray B. Markely, Jr., M.D. 
707 Thornwood Ct., Baltimore, Md. 21234 
Charles B. Marshall, Jr., M.D. 
824th AF Disp.. APO 239, San Francisco, 
Calif. 96239 

George Y. Massenbury, Jr., M.D. 

700 Spring St., Macon, Ga. 31201 

Robert E. May, M.D. 

5662 The Alameda, Baltimore, Md. 21212 

George McElfatrick, M.D. 
830 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
21210 

Thomas C. McPherson, M.D. 
Mead Johnson Lab., Evansville, Indiana 
47721 

Clarence E. McWilliams, Jr., M.D. 
Reisterstown & Cherry Hill Rds., Reisters- 
town, Md. 21136 



Joseph Mintzer, M.D. 

221 Lake Ave., Saratoga Sp., N. Y. 12866 

John A. Mitchell, M.D. 

8 1 1 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

John Morrison, M.D. 

Norwich St. Hosp., Norwich, Conn. 06361 

J. D. Nataro, M.D. 

42 Bluegrass La., Levittown, N. Y. 1 1756 

Pomeroy Nichols, Jr., M.D. 
I021-15th St., Augusta, Ga. 30901 

Ellsworth H. North, Jr., M.D. 

R.D. # 1, Sunrise Dr., Industry, Pa. 15052 

James S. O'Hare, M.D. 

Travis CI., Jacksonville, Texas 75766 

Wm. W. Orrison, M.D. 

125 N. Fowler St., Meade, Kansas 67864 

Lt. Col. H. Osborne 

2011 Iverson St., S.E., Washington, D. C. 
20031 



A. J. Owen, M.D. 

1200 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, 
21212 



Md. 



Wm. F. Park, M.D. 

Howard Hill-Wits End, Wheeling, W. Va. 
26003 

Earl R. Paul, M.D. 

36 Greene St., Cumberland, Md. 21502 

Clemmer M. Peck, M.D. 

430 Monterey St., Los Gatos, Calif. 95030 

Lois I. Piatt, M.D. 

2300 K St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20037 

J. C. Rawlins, M.D. 

603 N. Willey St., Seaford, Del. 19973 

Milton Reisch, M.D. 

104 E. 40th St., N.Y.. N. Y. 10016 

Ralph A. Reiter, M.D. 

112 Bedford. Cumberland. Md. 21502 

R. A. Riley, Jr., M.D. 

95 Cathedral St., Annapolis, Md. 21401 

James A. Roberts, M.D. 
8907 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 
20910 

R. C. Rossberg, M.D. 
1660 S. Alameda St. 
90021 



Los Angeles, Calif. 



Vol. 51. No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Sidney Sacks, M.D. 

20525 N.E. 19th St., N. Miami Beach, Fia. 

33162 
J. A. Sewell, M.D. 

920 Valentine Ct., Melbourne, Fla. 32901 
Frank Shallenberger, Jr., M.D. 
Craycroft Med. Ctr., Tucson, Ariz. 85716 
David N. Sills, Jr., M.D. 
1 1 S.E. Front St., Milford, Del. 19963 
Lt. Col. E. P. Smith, Jr., M.D. 
7650 S.W. 1 33rd St., Miami, Fla. 33 1 56 
C. W. Stallard, Jr., M.D. 
28 Shore Pk. Dr., Newport News, Va. 23602 
Herbert Swindell, M.D. 
USAF Hosp. HMR, Keesler AFB, Miss. 

39534 
Leon Toby, M.D. 

1 1 1 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 60602 
James A. Vaughn, Jr., M.D. 
5965 Ponce deLeon, Coral Gables, Fla. 

33146 
Elliott L. Weitzman, M.D. 
68 E. 86th St., N. Y., N. Y. 10028 
Irl Wentz. M.D. 
911 W. Henderson St., Salisbury, N. C. 

28144 
Walter Mcllhaney Wolfe, Jr., M.D. 
5th Sta. Hosp., APO 154, N. Y., N, Y. 

09154 
Joseph B. Workman. M.D. 
162 Ligon Rd., RED 5, Ellicott City, Md. 

21043 
Alexander W. Young, Jr., M.D. 
520 E. 64th St., N. Y., N. Y. 10021 
Richard A. Young, M.D. 
101 King St., Hagerstown, Md. 21740 



CLASS OF 19.51— 1.5TH ANNIVERSARY 

Law L. Ager, M.D. 

1901 12th Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 35205 

Robert K. Arthur, Jr., M.D. 
318 Westwood Ave., High Point, N. C. 
27262 

John P. Barthel, M.D. 

1911 1st Ave., S.E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
52402 



Earl M. Bcardsley, M.D. 

207 Maryland Ave., Salisbury, Md. 21801 

Arthur K. Bell, M.D. 

I I 70 Sylvania Ave., Toledo, Ohio 43612 

Joseph Bilder, Jr.. M.D. 

1300 8th St., Wichita Falls, Texas 76301 

Beverly R. Birley, M.D. 

837 N.E. 20th Ave., Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

33304 
Nancy Blades, M.D. 
2141 Rollingridge La., Cincinnati, Ohio 

45211 
John Wesley Bossard, M.D. 
1 1 1 Med. Ctr. Bldg., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 46802 
John V. Brannon, M.D. 
1 1 1 Center St., Bridgeport, W. Va. 26330 
John R. Buell. Jr., M.D. 
402 Main St., Laurel, Md. 20810 
Russell L. Christopher, M.D. 
26 South St., Pittsfield, Mass. 01202 
Raymond Clemmens, M.D. 
Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
Dwight I. Coblentz, M.D. 
5102 Roland Ave., Balto., Md. 21210 
Kaohlin M. Coffman, M.D. 
421 Broad St., Montoursviile, Pa. 17754 
Solomon Cohen, M.D. 
2425 Geary St., San Francisco, Cahf. 94115 
Raymond Curanzy, M.D. 
39 E. Maple St., Palmyra, Pa. 17078 
Joseph Deckelbaum, M.D. 
4017 Liberty Hgts. Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

21207 

Ernest A. Dettbarn, M.D. 

Walkersville, Md. 21793 

Leon Donner, M.D. 

4023 Brookhill Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21215 

Winston C. Dudley, M.D. 

585 Winter St., S.E., Salem, Oregon 97301 

George M. Dunn, M.D. 

Box 127, Princess Anne, Md. 21853 

Wm. Dunnagan, M.D. 

800 Rusk St., Amarillo, Texas 79106 

David E. Edwards, M.D. 

RD 2, Box 238, Keyser, W. Va. 26726 

Wm. H. Edwards, Jr., M.D. 

100 E. Biddle St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Wm. G. Esmond, M.D. 

537 Stamford Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21229 

Otis D. Evans, Jr., M.D. 

105 Grover St., Shelby, N. C. 28150 

Charles K. Ferguson, M.D. 

1953 Mears Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45230 

Joseph C. Fitzgerald, M.D. 

Med. Ctr., Pine Bluff Rd., Salisbury, Md. 

21801 
Rowland E. J. Fullilove, M.D. 
Turkey Farm Rd., Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 
James P. Gallaher, M.D. 
Med. Ctr., Salisbury, Md. 21801 
Mario Garcia-Palmieri, M.D. 
Univ. of P.R. Sch. of Med., San Juan. P. R. 

00931 
F. S. Gardner, Jr., M.D. 
P.O. Box 351, Fayetteville, N. C. 28302 
John B. Gates, M.D. 
6095 N. Country Club Rd., Merced, Calif. 

95340 

Benjamin D. Gordon, M.D. 
2875 Main St., Stratford, Conn. 06497 
Doris M. Harris, M.D. 

6010 Shenandoah Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 
90056 

Frederick J. Hatem, M.D. 
908 S. Washington, Havre de Grace, Md. 
21078 

Robert C. Hopkins, M.D. 

216 Main St., Lake City, Pa. 16423 

George J. Item, M.D. 

lOOVi W. Market St., Orrville, Ohio 44667 

Frederick M. Johnson, M.D. 

Box 460, La Plata, Md. 20646 

Wallace E. Johnson, M.D. 

137 Main St.. Dayton, Ohio 45402 

Paul E. Kaschel, M.D. 

535 N. 105th St., Wauwatosa, Wise. 53213 

Willard F. Kindt, M.D. 

601 Hanover Ave., Allentown, Pa. 18103 

David Kipnis, M.D. 

St. Louis Children's Hosp., 500 S. Kings- 
highway Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 631 10 

Harry L. Knipp, M.D. 

4116 Edmondson Ave, Baltimore, Md. 
21229 



Howard C. Kramer, M.D. 

242 Coldbrook, Lutherville-Timonium, Md. 

21093 
William E. Lamb, M.D. 
Box 218, Jacksonville, Fla. 32218 
Theodore R. Lanning, M.D. 
955 Park Ave., N. Y., N. Y. 10028 
Jack Liebman, M.D. 
490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 94102 
Leo H. Ley, Jr., M.D. 

456 N. Center St., Cumberland, Md. 21502 
Leonard Melvin Lister, M.D. 
7121 ParkHgts. Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21215 
James M. MacDonald, Jr., M.D. 
4819 Santa Monica Ave., San Diego, Calif. 

92107 
Earl B. McFadden, M.D. 
Mem. Hosp., Chatham Co., Savannah, Ga. 

31404 
John W. McFadden, M.D. 
407 Tonawanda Trail, Hartville, Ohio 44632 

Charles Mc Grady, M.D. 
2701 Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, Fla. 
33060 

Kathleen R. McGrady, M.D. 
1919 Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, Fla. 
33060 

Ricardo T. Mendez-Bryan, M.D. 

Univ. Hosp., Rio Piedras, P. R. 00928 

John S. Metcalf, Jr., M.D. 

2425 Geary, San Francisco, Calif. 941 15 

Robert S. Mosser, M.D. 

902 Starbit Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21204 

Arthur Z. Mutter, M.D. 

78 Wolcott Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 02167 

Donald J. Myers, M.D. 

608 Main St., Wintersville, Ohio 43953 

Edward J. Nygen, M.D. 

RD 5, Westminster, Md. 21 157 

John Stambaugh Orth, M.D. 

Air Force Hosp., Ft. Worth, Texas 76127 

Douglas R. Packard, M.D. 
Box 22, Clinton, N. C. 28328 

F. Robert Perrila, M.D. 
Suite 214-17 Med. Arts Bldg., Baltimore, 
Md. 21201 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMM ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Henry D. Perry, Jr., M.D. 

6024 \V;ishington St., West Hollywood, Fla. 

33023 
Guy Reeser, Jr., M.D. 
St. Michaels, Md. 21663 
Henry G. Reeves, Jr., M.D. 
Med. Ctr., Pine BlutT, Salisbury, Md. 
Eugene B. Rex, M.D. 
l.ankenau Med. Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

19131 
Georgia M. Reynolds, M.D. 
220 N.W. 68th Ave., Apt. 4, Plantation, Fla. 
Aubrey D. Richardson 
Univ. Hosp., Baltimore 
M. J. Rombro, M.D. 

805 Fuselage Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21220 
H. S. Roland, Jr.. M.D. 
Lee Med. Bldg., Richmond, Va. 23220 
A. Saavedra-Amador, M.D. 
Box 98, Hatillo, P. R. 00659 
Arthur H. Schmale, Jr., M.D. 
70 Bradford Rd., Rochester, N. Y. 14618 
R. D. Scott, M.D. 
2301 W. 1st St., Ft. Myers, Fla. 33901 

J. T. Scully, M.D. 

7 1 5 Johnson St., Gary, Ind. 46402 

Wm. H. H. Shea, M.D. 
USAF Office Surg. Gen., Washington, D. C. 
20333 

Samuel N. Sherry, M.D. 

35 Robinson St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138 

L. Dale Simmons, M.D. 
201 PrintyBldg. 
Clarksburg, W.Va. 26301 

Edward M. Sipple, M.D. 

Moore Mem. Hosp., Pinehurst, N. C. 28374 

R. Kennedy Skipton, M.D. 

4500 College Ave., College Park, Md. 20740 

David Solomon, M.D. 

2525 Eutaw PL. Baltimore, Md. 21217 

John H. Stone, M.D. 

Box 607, La Plata, Md. 20646 

Julian T. Sutton, M.D. 

Norfolk Gen. Hosp., Norfolk, Va. 23507 

R. B. Tobias, M.D. 

1615 Riverside Dr., Williamsport, Pa. 17707 



H. L. Twigg, M.D. 

Georgetown Univ. Hosp., Washington, D. C. 
20007 

M. M. Udel, M.D. 

St. Luke's Hosp., N. Y., N. Y. 10025 

R. J. Venrose, M.D. 

9939 Pk. Ave., Sepulveda, Calif. 91343 

Charles P. Watson, Jr., M.D. 

New Martinsville, W. Va. 26135 

R. D. Weekley, M.D. 

Med. Eye Bldg.. Inc., 5370 Pearl Rd., Cleve- 
land, Ohio 44129 

Harvey P. Wheelwright, M.D. 

2955 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, Utah 84403 

C. R. Williams, M.D. 

508 S. Washington St., Gettysburg, Pa. 
17325 

Shelly C. York, Jr., M.D. 

400 Randolph St., Thomasville, N. C. 27360 

Thomas L. York, M. D. 

4541 Everhart, Corpus Christi, Texas 7841 1 



CLASS OF 1956— lOTH ANNIVERSARY 

George A. Abeshouse, M.D. 

2504 Shellydale Dr., Baltimore, Md. 21209 

John E. Adams, M.D. 

18 Marbury Rd., Severna Pk., Md. 21 146 

Robert T. Adkins, M.D. 

Fruitland P.O., Fruitland, Md. 21826 

Daniel G. Anderson, M.D. 

1313 Taney Ave., Salisbury, Md. 21801 

Henry A. Baer, M.D. 

U. S. Naval Hosp., Corpus Christi, Texas 

Lt. Stephen Barchet, M.C. 
USN 568k77/2100 Naval Support Act., 
Navy #510, FPO, N. Y., N. Y. 

Richard Belgrad, M.D. 

8039 N. 8th Ave., Phoenix, Ariz. 85021 

Frank Bellomo, M.D. 

71 Smull Ave., Caldwell, N. J. 07006 

Jerald H. Bennion, M.D. 

911 Mark Ave., Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 

Capt. Stanley M. Bialke, M.D. 

8218 Wise. Ave., Bethesda, Md. 20014 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Morris L. Blue, M.D. 

5816 Greenspring Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

21209 
H. F. Bongardt, Jr., M.D. 
Duke Hosp., Durham, N. C. 27706 
Ernest O. Brown, M.D. 
3414 Duvall Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21216 
Richard A. Burningham, M.D. 
4040 Matheson Ave., Miami, Fla. 33133 
James A. Burwell, M.D. 
947 Oakwood Dr., Falls Church, Va. 22041 
Robert J. Byrne, M.D. 
1308 DeKalb St., Norristown, Pa. 19401 
Theodore R. Carski, M.D. 
Rt. 2, Box 1 05, Phoenix, Md. 2 1 1 3 1 
James Castellano, M.D. 
11311 Francis Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21227 
James McA. Chase, Jr., M.D. 
75 Westland Drive, Dover, Delaware 1 1901 
Wm. Cohen, M.D. 

3700 W. Rogers Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21215 
Thomas H. Collawn, M.D. 
500 Ellsworth Rd., Charlotte, N.C. 28207 

David L. Davidson, M.D. 

USA Hosp., Ft. Amador, C. Z. 00101 

Evelyn Anna De La Vega, M.D. 

44 McLelland Blvd., Brownsville, Texas 

78520 

James T. Dorsey, M.D. 

910 Turner St., Emmaus, Pa. 18049 

John D. Downing, Jr., M.D. 

10700 Seminole Blvd., Largo, Fla. 33542 

Ludwig J. Eglseder, M.D. 

514 S. Tripp Ave., Easton, Md. 21601 

James T. Estes, M.D. 

915 19th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20006 

Richard G. Farmer, M.D. 

2020 E. 93rd St., Cleveland, Ohio 44106 

Richard Finegold, M.D. 

3600 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213 

Girard V. Foster, M.D. 

84 Ladbroke Rd., London W. 11, England 

Jorge A. Franco, M.D. 

1090 Calle 5 Villa Navarez, Rio Piedras, 
P. R. 00928 



Marshall Franklin, M.D. 

5 Elmcrest Terr., Norwalk, Conn. 06850 

Edward D. Frohlich, M.D. 

Research Div., Cleveland CI., Cleveland, 

Ohio 44106 
Alfred Wm. Grigoleit, M.D. 
R.D. 2, Box 225, Havre de Grace, Md. 

21078 
J. Henry Hawkins, M.D. 
900 Cottage Gr. Rd., Bloomfield, Conn. 

06002 
Robert N. Headley, M.D. 
Dept. Med., Bowman Gray Sch., Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 27103 
Neil C. Henderson, M.D. 
400 N.E. 44th St., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

33308 
Major Webb. S. Hersperger, M.D. 
Munson Army Hosp., Ft. Leavenworth, 

Kansas 66027 
Lee Hoffman, M.D. 

Van Etten Hosp. Ctr.. Bronx, N. Y. 10461 
Virgil R. Hooper, M.D. 
718 Beach St., Flint, Mich. 48502 
Ralph T. Hummel, M.D. 
Box 309, Sedro Wolley, Washington 98224 
Gilbert E. Hurwitz, M.D. 
1800 Eye St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

20006 
Daniel F. Johnston, M.D. 
1504 Upshire Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21218 
Albert V. Kanner, M.D. 
1 10 E. Main St., Madison, Wise. 53703 
Robert M. Kaplan, M.D. 
Boston State Hosp.. Boston, Mass. 02124 
Sheppard G. Kellam, M.D. 
5805 Dorchester Ave., Chicago, 111. 60637 

John E. Kelley, Jr., M.D. 

173 Parkside Ave., Syracuse, N.Y. 13207 

C. Herschel King, M.D. 

3212 Sherbon Dr., Durham, N. C. 27707 

Kenneth M. Klatt, M.D. 

1300 Univ. Ave., Madison, Wise. 53715 

Paul W. Knowles, M.D. 

101 E. Furnish, Pendleton, Ore. 97801 

ElmerC. Koller, Jr.,M.D. 

S & E Pratt Hosp., Baltimore. Md. 21204 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMXI ASSOCIATIOX SECTION 



Bernard Kramer, M.D. 

153 S. Main St., Wallinglord, Conn. 064'): 

H, Coleman Kramer, M.D. 

6420 Adams Ave., Miami Beach. Fla. 33140 

Sheldon Kress, M.D. 

911 Balmoral Dr., Silver Spring, Md. 20903 

Louis J. Lancaster, NLD. 

355 N.W. Richmond Bch. Rd., Seattle, 

Wash. 98177 
Joseph G. Lanzi, M.D. 
Elkton Med. Pk., Elkton, Md. 21921 
Carl P. Laughlin, NLD. 
31 16 Victoria Blvd., Hampton, Va. 32261 
NLithew H. M. Lee, M.D. 
79-04 150th St., Flushing, N. Y. 1 1367 
Wni. A. Lemmert, M.D. 
37 1 6 Swann Ave., Tampa, Fla. 33609 
Betty L Libert, M.D. 
Grand Central Sta., Box 3098, N. Y., N. Y. 

1 000 1 
John B. Littleton, M.D. 
1515 Martin Blvd., Baltimore, Md. 21220 
\Vm. T. Lloyd, M.D. 
327 E. Main St., Newark, Del. 19712 

Thomas A. Love, M.D. 

14 W. Main St., Thurmont, Md. 21788 

Gerald N. Maggrid, M.D. 

Pikesville Med. Ctr., Baltimore, Md. 21208 

Robert J. Mahon, M.D. 

602 E. Joppa Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21204 

Samuel J. Mangus, M.D. 
Qtr. 2764, Ferguson Cir., Ft. Eustace, Va. 
23604 

Herbert M. Marton, M.D. 

245 Engle St., Englewood, N. J. 07631 

Joseph S. McLaughlin, M.D. 

Clinical Ctr., NIH, Bethesda, Md. 20014 

Robert G. Muth, M.D. 

Kansas City Gen. Hosp., Kansas City, Mo. 
64108 

Richard I. Myers, M.D. 

207 Franklin Ave., Silver Sp., Md. 20901 

John F. Nowell, M.D. 

Arlington Med. Bldg., Arlington, Va. 22207 

Clark Lamont Osteen, M.D. 

1 lA Md. Arts Ctr., Savannah, Ga. 31405 



David A. Oursler, M.D. 

1 I 18 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

\Vm. M. Palmer. M.D. 

6700 Foothills Blvd., Oakland. Calif. 94605 

Wilbur C. Pickett, Jr., M.D. 

3714 Woodbine St., Chevy Chase, Md. 

20015 
Marvin S. Piatt, M.D. 
4120 Silver St., S.E.. Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

87108 

Richard L. Plumb, M.D. 

6303 S. Park Blvd., Houston, Texas 77021 

Irvin P. Pollack, M.D. 

4419 Falls Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21211 

George E. Reahl, M.D. 

804 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Harold L Rodman, M.D. 
1302-18th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
20036 

Harry Paul Ross, M.D. 

203 N. Queen St., Chestertown, Md. 21620 

Charles A. Sanislow, Jr., M.D. 

804 Vance Rd., Midland, Mich. 48640 

Gerald Schuster, M.D. 

8812 Cameron St., Silver Spring, Md. 20910 

Roy O. Shaub, M.D. 

1 1 1 Sixth Ave., E. Twin Falls, Idaho 83301 

Virginia Truitt Sherr, M.D. 

Norristown St. Hosp., Norristown, Pa. 19401 

Wm. A. Sinton, Jr., M.D. 

102 Allegheny Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21204 

James W. Skaggs, Jr., M.D. 

1200 Blythe Blvd., Charlotte, N. C. 28203 

Paul V. Slater, M.D. 

Medical Center, Salisbury, Md. 21801 

George T. Smith, M.D. 

Desert Res. Inst., Univ. of Nev., Reno, Nev. 
89502 

George A. Sowell, M.D. 
520 Pinehill Rd., N.W., Orangeburg, S. C. 
29115 

James J. Stovin, M.D. 

45 Elm Ave., Metuchen, N. J. 08840 

Robert G. Stuck, M.D. 

Lake Ave., Wolcott, N. Y. 14590 



Jaiiiiarv, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



H. E. Sturgeon, M.D. 

5126 Princess A. Rd., Virginia Beach, Va. 

23452 
Albert L. Trucker, Jr., M.D. 
Mtgmry. Dr., Santa Rosa, Calif. 95405 
Edwin W. Whiteford, Jr., M.D. 
Wheeler School Rd., Whiteford, Md. 21 160 
John Z. Williams, M.D. 
1350 Sundown Dr., Aurora, 111. 60506 
Harry D. Wilson, Jr., M.D. 
Adams-Stratton Rds., Williamstown, Mass. 

01267 
Robert Lee Wright, M.D. 
207 Robinson Bldg., Elyria, Ohio 44035 



CLASS OF 1961— 5TH ANNIVERSARY 

Andres Acosta-Otero, M.D. 
Univ. Hosp., Bahimore, Md. 21201 
James R. Appleton. M.D. 
531 Cortland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 13205 
Neil R. Arbegast, M.D. 
Methodist Hosp., Houston, Texas 77025 
Nicholas R. Bachur, M.D. 
Natl. Heart Inst. NIH, Bethesda, Md. 20014 
George E. Bandy, M.D. 
Univ. Mo. Med. Ctr., Columbia, Mo. 65201 
Joseph C. Battaile, M.D. 
Springfield St. Hosp., Sykesville, Md. 21784 
Joseph W. Berkow, M.D. 
J. H. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21205 
Carl P. Berner, M.D. 
Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
Oscar H. Bing, M.D. 

Georgetown Univ. Hosp., Washington, D. C. 
20007 

Myron B. Blum, M.D. 

5720 Pimlico Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21209 

Anthony R. Boccuti, M.D. 
3198 Wrightsboro Rd., Apt. A, Augusta, 
Ga. 30904 

Thomas G. Breslin, M.D. 
R. I. Hosp., 593 Eddy St., Providence, R. L 
02902 

John N. Browell, Jr., M.D. 

H. Ford Hosp., Detroit, Mich. 48202 



Joseph N. Brouillette, M.D. 

H. Ford Hosp., Detroit, Mich. 48202 

James C. Bulger, M.D. 

Mercy Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Milton H. Buschman, Jr., M.D. 

2511 W. Weaver Ave., Springfield, Md. 

65804 
Capt. Ronald L. Cain, M.D. 
05708389, 13th USASA Field Sta., Box 44, 

APO 210, N. Y., N. Y. 09210 
James J. Cerda, M.D. 

Univ. of Pa. Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104 
Angela W. Clarke, M.D. 
P.O. Box 1077, Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 
Francis A. Clark, Jr., M.D. 
Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
John W. Clark, M.D. 
Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
Kenneth L. Cloninger, Jr., M.D. 
524 Corran P., Franklin Lakes, N. J. 07417 

Maurice M. Davidson, M.D. 
New England Ctr. Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
02111 

Gregory Delli-Pizzi, M.D. 

860 Madison Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 38103 

Karl W. Davenport, M.D. 
16710 N.E. 16th Place, Bellevue, Washing- 
ton 16710 

John N. Diacoyanis, M.D. 

Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Wm. H. Dudney, M.D. 

5092 Dartmouth, Westminster, Calif. 92683 

Daniel J. Fall, M.D. 

Mercy Hosp., Baltimore. Md. 21202 

Grover Farrish, M.D. 

200 Hartman Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 
02159 

Bernadine C. Faw, M.D. 

923 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Robert A. Fink, M.D. 

Univ. of Chicago Clinic, 950 E. 59th St., 
Chicago, 111. 60637 

Wm. R. Fleming, Jr., M.D. 

8711 Geren Rd., Silver Spring, Md. 20901 

Redwell K. Forbes, M.D. 

Norfolk Gen. Hosp., Norfolk, Va. 23507 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Carlos E. Girod, M.D. 

P.O. Box 863. Hato Rev, P. R. 00919 

Leonard W. Glass. M.D. 

Univ. Hosp.. Baltimore. Md. 21201 

Jay S. Goodman. M.D. 

Vanderbilt Univ. Hosp.. Nashville, Tenn. 
37203 

Ronald L. Gutherlet. M.D. 

USA Med. Service Gr.. APO 331. San 
Francisco. Calif. 96431 

Samuel H. Henck. M.D. 

109 N. Washington St.. Carthage, N. Y. 
13619 

Robert L. Heymann. M.D. 

Tripler Gen'l. Hosp.. APO 438, San Fran- 
cisco. Calif. 96438 

Gerald A. Hofkin. M.D. 

6026 Green Meadow Pkwy., Baltimore, Md. 
21209 

Richard G. Holz, M.D. 

809 Chapelgate La., Baltimore. Md. 21229 

James L. Hooper. M.D. 

3003 Ferndale PI., Kensington, Md. 20795 

Carlos E. Ifarraguerri, M.D. 

12 Palmasola St., Bayamon, P. R. 00619 

Gerald Kempthorne, M.D. 

P.O. Box 4, Spring Green, Wise. 53588 

Ronald Lee Krome, M.D. 

Receiving Hosp., Detroit, Mich. 48226 

Alfred Kronthal, M.D. 

Research-Educ. Hosps., Chicago, 111. 60612 

Harry V. Langeluttig, Jr., M.D. 

Univ. Mo. Med. Ctr., Columbia, Mo. 65202 

Philip W. Lankford, M.D. 

71 1 Market St., Lewisberg. Pa. 17837 

Marc S. Leventhal, M.D. 

1271 DeWitt Dr., Akron, Ohio 44313 

John P. Light, M.D. 

Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

David E. Litrenta, M.D. 

36 N. Main St., York, Pa. 17315 

Robert E. Ludike, M.D. 
USA Med. Ser. Carib., Det. 1, Ft. Clayton, 
Canal Zone 00101 

Jerome J. Mahoney, M.D. 
USAF Hosp., Tachikawa, APO 323, San 
Francisco, Calif. 96423 



John R. Marsh, M.D. 

Rt. 4, Box 109, Westminster, Md. 21 157 

James F. McCarter. M.D. 

So. Balto. Hosp.. Baltimore. Md. 21230 

Thomas J. McGeoy, Jr., M.D. 

Naval Hosp., Jamaica, N.Y. 1 1425 

Roger L. Mehl, M.D. 

Presby. St. Lukes, 1753 W. Congress Pkwy., 

Chicago, III. 60612 
Gerald A. Miller, M.D. 
Balto. E. E. T. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21217 
Charles L. Morreels. Jr.. M.D. 
224 Blenheim Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21212 
Robert J. Myerburg, M.D. 
Charity Hosp., 1532 Tulane Ave., New 

Orleans. La. 70140 
Michael A. Oldstone, M.D. 
Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 
Rodney L. Ortel, M.D. 
Balto. E. E. & T. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 

21217 
Walter Filmore Oster, M.D. 
USPHS Hosp., Bahimore, Md. 21218 
Lewis A. Ottenritter, M.D. 
9046 Piney Br. Rd., Silver Spring, Md. 

20903 
Douglas R. Packard, M.D. 
P.O. Box 22, Clinton, N. C. 28328 
Lawrence J. Pazourek, M.D. 
4202 Sheldon Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21206 
Clifton C. Presser, M.D. 
Hosp. Women of Md., Lafayette Ave. & 

John St.. Baltimore, Md. 21217 
Kenneth E. Rasmussen, M.D. 
c/o American Mission, Box 1111, Addis 

Ababa, Ethiopia 00100 
Paul A. Reeder, Jr., M.D. 
Beckley Appalachian Reg. Hosp., Beckley, 

W. Va. 25801 
John A. Reeves, M.D. 
722 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 4101 1 
Earl F. Riter, Jr., M.D. 
Hosp. Women of Md., Baltimore, Md. 21217 
David Rosen, M.D. 

259 Howell Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45220 
Capt. Richard M. Snarles, USAF MC 
86th Tactical Hosp., APO N. Y., N. Y. 

09012 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Richard F. Schillaci, M.D. 

93 Prentice Rd., Levittown, L. I., N. Y. 

11756 
Marvin M. Small, M.D. 
USA Hosp., USMA, West Point, N. Y. 

10996 
Thomas M. Sonn, M.D. 
Georgetown Univ. Hosp., Washington, D. C. 

20007 

Wayne B. Tate, M.D. 

108 Central Ave., N.W., Glen Burnie, Md. 
21061 

Larry G. Tilley, M.D. 

4625 Arabia Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21214 

George E. Urban, Jr., M.D. 

Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Nina C. Vann, M.D. 

550 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 21205 

Dennis Vitale, M.D. 

USPHS Hosp., Seattle, Wash. 981 14 



Brantley P. Vitek, M.D. 

Georgetown Univ. Hosp., Washington, D. C. 

20007 
Zack J. Waters, Jr., M.D. 
Spartanburg Genl., Spartanburg, S. C. 

29303 
Andrew W. Wendling, M.D. 
Manhattan E. E. T. Hosp., N. Y., N. Y. 

10021 
Leiand D. Whitelock, M.D. 
7905 Montwood Rd, Baltimore, Md. 21207 
John L. Winnacker, M.D. 
Vet. Adm. Hosp., Washington, D. C. 20007 
Howard M. Wisotzkey, M.D. 
Dept. Neurol., Univ. Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 

21201 
Arthur Wolpert, M.D. 
Central Islip Hosp., Central Islip, N. Y. 

11722 
Anthony J. Young, M.D. 
410 Westshire Dr., Baltimore, Md. 21228 



Roster of Senior Alumni, 1966-67 



At the annual Medical Alumni Associa- 
tion banquet in 1964, the president of the 
Alumni Association presented to the 50 
year graduates of the three schools, their 
50-year diplomas. This was the last for 
the alumni of the Baltimore Medical Col- 
lege, the last class being graduated in June 
1914. In 1965 a similar event marked 
the last 50 year class for the College for 
Physicians and Surgeons. The alumni of 
the three schools will then become a single 
body. 

It is proposed that so long as they shall 
live, the individual alumni of the Balti- 
more Medical College and the College for 
Physicians and Surgeons shall be listed in 
the Bulletin of the School of Medicine 
each year, so that the identity of these 
physicians can properly be maintained. 



In addition, the Medical Alumni Asso- 
ciation proposes to list all known gradu- 
ates of the School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland including this group 
with the B. M. C.-P. & S group under the 
heading "Senior Alumni." Each year the 
Bulletin will publish this directory as a 
reminder that a large group of active and 
distinguished alumni are still in the prac- 
tice of medicine a half century or more 
after graduation. 

The School and the Alumni Association 
do not propose to forget these honored 
members subsequent to their receiving 
the 50-year diploma. Instead, the younger 
men might well refer to this senior group 
for advice (there are over 400 living alumni 
in practice more than 50 years) and counsel. 



William Clay Abel, M.D. 
2314 Frace Ave 
Orlando, Fla. 



SENIOR ALUMNI 

'01, BMC 



A. W. Adkins. M.D., 12, P&S 
361 HillsboroSt. 
Lexington, Ky. 40505 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Andrew A. Anderson, M.D., 12. P&S 
1 101 DeseretBIdg. 
Salt Lake City. Utah 

James Leland Anderson. M.D., '08, UofM 
213 Butler Ave. or 68 B Vardry St. Med. Ct. 
Greenville, S. C. 29607 

Charles W. Armstrong. M.D., "14. UofM 
629 Mitchell Ave., Salisbury, N. C. 28144 

Walter Cathcart Arthur, M.D.. '91, 

UofM 
2225 Fifteenth St. 
Cuyahoga Falls. Ohio 44223 

Oscar T. Barber. M.D., 'OS. P&S 
Health Oflicer 
53 Temple St. 
Fredonia. N. Y. 

Yates M. Barber. M.D., "14, UofM 

275-3 

Warsaw, Va. 22572 

Carl J. Baumgartner. M.D.. 11. P&S 
4841 River Point Rd. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 32207 

Philip Bean, M.D., '13, UofM 
Great Mills, Md. 20634 

Grover Cleveland Be.\rd, M.D., '12. 

UofM 
2709 Locknor Dr. 
Raleigh, N. C. 27608 

Elmer Jos. Beaulieu, M.D., "07, BMC 
215 South Ave. 

Whitman. Mass. 02382 

Lt. Col. C. L. Beaven. M.D., '08, BMC 
1417 Burtonwood Dr. 
Alexandria, Va. 22307 

William F. Beckner, M.D., "11, BMC 
713 West Virginia Bldg. 
Huntington, W. Va. 

Frederick V. Butler, M.D., "06. UofM 
1014 Francis Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21227 

Harry J. Bennett. M.D., "06, BMC 

121 N.Julian St. 
Ehensburg, Pa. 

Clarence Irving Benson, M.D., "09, UofM 

Box 123 

Port Deposit, Md. 21904 



Rafael Bernabe. M.D., "13, P&S 

61 Savador Brau St. 

San Juan. P. R. 

Harry Mei chior Biffar, M.D., "12, P&S 

144-31 14th Ave. 

Flushing. N. Y. 

CoL. Harry Aloysius Bishop, M.D., '12, 

UofM 
3718 Manor Road 
Chevy Chase, Md. 20015 
William P. Black, M.D., '14, P&S 
1 1 1 Capitol St. 
Charleston, W. Va. 25300 
LowRiE W. Bl.^ke, M.D., '14, UofM 
5609 7th Ave. Dr., W. 
Bradenton, Fla. 33505 
Walter D. Blankenship, M.D., '10, P&S 
31 Sunset Place 
Lancaster, Pa. 

James G. Blower. M.D., '05, P&S 
308 Rose Blvd. 
Akron. Ohio 44302 
O. H. Bobitt, M.D., '14, P&S 
863 24th Ave., N. 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 33713 
Ray Maxwell Bobbitt, M.D., '13, P&S 
1139 4th Ave. 
Huntington, W. Va. 

Alvah p. Bohannan, M.D., '05, UofM 
Virgilina, Va. 24598 
Lawrence F. Boland, M.D., '11, BMC 
P. O. Box 339 
Frankfort. Ky. 40601 
William P. Bonar, M.D., '06, P&S 
1006 Tomlinson Ave. 
Moundsville, W. Va. 26041 

Robert A. Bonner, Sr., M.D., '12, UofM 
51 West Main St. 
Waterbury, Conn. 06702 

Charles F. Bove, M.D., '13, BMC 
70 E. Main St. 
Patchogue, N. Y. 11772 

Lee Bransford, M.D., '10, BMC 
1282MayfairRd. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 32207 

Harrison L. Brehmer, M.D., '10, P&S 
106 Girard Blvd., S.E. 

Albuquerque, N. Mexico 87106 



Januarv, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



James C. Brogden, M.D., '14, UofM 
210UticaSq. Med. Ctr. 
1980 Utica Sq. 
Tulsa, Okla. 74114 

Frank J. Broschart, M.D., '11, BMC 
8 Russell Ave. 
Gaithersburg, Md. 20760 

Morton Brotman, M.D., '14, UofM 
2 1 2 South Orange Ave. , Apt. # 1 
South Orange, New Jersey 

Archie Eugene Brown, M.D., '11, UofM 

918 Poinsett Highway 

Greenville, S. C. 29609 

Joseph Edward Brumback, M.D., '09, 

BMC 
Medical Arts Bldg. 
Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Jesus Maria Buck, M.D., '13, UofM 
1004 E. 36th St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Sidney Eli Buchanan, M.D., '12, UofM 
390 S. Union St. 
Concord, N. C. 

Louis Arthur Buie, M.D., '15, UofM 
200 First St., S.W. 
Rochester, Minn. 55901 

Frank Burden, M.D., '05, UofM 
:^ 3 Bagshaw Ave. 
Brighton, South Australia 

J. J. Burne, M.D., '10, P&S 

101 N. Grove St. 

East Orange, N. J. 07017 

Ira Burns, M.D., '05, UofM 
2800 N. Atlantic, Apt. 605 
Daytona Beach, Fla. 32018 

Julian G. Busby, M.D., "04, UofM 
901 W. Henderson St. 
Salisbury, N. C. 28144 

Lawt^ence a. Cahill, M.D., '1 1, BMC 
361 Lafayette St. 
Newark, N. J. 

Charles A. Cahn, M.D., '15, UofM 
2145W. BahimoreSt. 
Baltimore, Md. 21223 

Fred Glover Campbell, M.D., 11, BMC 
Warren, Maine 04864 



Jesse W. Campbell, M.D., '09, BMC 

923 Philadelphia St. 

Indiana, Pa. 

Ovid Sylvester Campbell, M.D., '10, P&S 

Grafton, W. Va. 

Harry Arthur Cantwell, M.D., '06, 

UofM 
Cecil Ave. 

North East, Md. 21901 
Manuel G. Carrera, M.D., '14, P&S 
101 N.Union St. 
Fajardo, P. R. 00648 

Col. Henry P. Carter, M.C, '03, UofM 
3445B S. Stafford St. 
Arlington, Va. 

Arthur Casilli, M.D., '14, UofM 
618 Newark Ave. 
Elizabeth, N. J. 07203 
Giuseppe Caturani, M.D., '10, UofM 
348 E. 11 6th St. 
New York, N. Y. 

Louis Chargin, M.D., '02, BMC 
1 W. 85th St. 
New York City 

Charles Peter Clautice, M.D., '12, UofM 
3013 St. Paul St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Hubert Clayter, M.D., '86, UofM 
Hopkins, S. C. 

Morris D. Cohen, M.D., '04, P&S 
1534 East Speedway 
Tucson, Arizona 85719 

Ralph Cohen, M.D., '15, UofM 
23 1 1 University Blvd. West 
Silver Spring, Md. 20902 

Joseph Coleman, M.D., '04, UofM 
455 West 23rd St. 
New York 11,N. Y. 

Clarence E. Collins, M.D., '02, UofM 
"The Hygeia." Hall Highway 
Crisfield.Md. 21817 

Wm. Stanislaus Conway, M.D., '10, UofM 
3210E. Perkins Ave. 
Sandusky, Ohio 

Everett L. Cook, M.D., '14, UofM 
nOSlade Ave., Apt. 306 
Baltimore. Md. 21208 



Vo}. 51. No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



C. Melvin Coon, M.D.. '03, UofM 

Milan, Pa. 

Everett Roy Cooper, M.D.. "12. P&S 

Troy, W. Va. 

Earle Somerville Coster, M.D., '06, 

UofM 
Solomons, Md. 20688 

George C. Coulbourne, M.D.. "10, UofM 
Marion, Md. 21838 

Franklin Clyde Craven, M.D. "13, UofM 
525 Sunset Ave. 
Ashboro, N. C. 
Henry L. Criss, M.D., UofM 
218 Adams St. 
Fairmont, W. Va. 

Denis J. Cronin, M.D.. "10, UofM 
1007 4th Ave. 
Huntington. W. Va. 
Gilbert L. Dailey, M.D., "14, UofM 
618 3rd St. 

Harrisburg. Pa. 17101 
M. Tolbert Dalton, '06, UofM 
6811 50th Ave., N.E. 
Seattle 15, Wash. 

Ch.\rles W. Daly. M.D., '10, P&S 
139 Warrenton Ave. 
Hartford, Conn. 06105 
George Davis. M.D., "08, UofM 
28 South Church St. 
Waynesboro, Pa. 
Theodore McCann Davis, M.D., '14, 

UofM 
108 Vannoy St. 
Greenville, S. C. 

Joseph L. DeCormis, M.D., UofM 
Accomac, Va. 

Harry Deibel, M.D., '12, UofM 
1226 Hanover St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21230 

Walter L. Denny, Jr., M.D., '14, UofM 
3908 N. Charles St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 

James DePasquale, M.D., '08, BMC 
530 E. 234th St. 
New York 70, N. Y. 



James E. Diehl, M.D., 
1627 Hanover Ave. 
Richmond 20, Va. 



II, UofM 



Louis Diener, M.D., '15, UofM 

25 1 1 Eutaw Place 

Baltimore, Md. 21217 

J. D. DiNSMORE, M.D., '09, UofM 

Port Clyde 

Nova Scotia, Canada 

Edward P. Disbrow. M.D., '08, UofM 

15 Irving St., Apt. 9 

Worcester, Mass. 

James Sylvester Dixon, M.D., UofM 

33 Parsonage St. 

Pittston, Pa. 

Harry C. Donahoo, M.D., UofM 

2428 Edgmont Ave. 

Chester, Pa. 

James Corbin Doughty, M.D., UofM 

Onancock, Va. 

Col. Chauncey E. Dovell, M.D., '14, 

UofM 
62 S. Bo.xwood St. 
Hampton, Va. 23369 
Joseph Lee Dowling, M.D., '15, UofM 
207 Waterman St. 
Providence, R. I. 02906 
John H. Doyle, M.D., '02, UofM 
North Dighton, Mass. 
Manuel Dueno Y Dueno, M.D., ' 05, 

UofM 
571 West 139th St. 
NewYork, N. Y. 10031 
James Fender Easton, M.D., '13, UofM 
45 Rosemary Lane 
Romney, W. Va. 

Vivian P. Edwards, M.D., UofM 
27 Hillside Ave. 
Edwardsville, Kingston, Pa. 

Michael Joseph Egan, Jr., M.D., UofM 
210 East Liberty St. 
Savannah, Ga. 

Samuel E. Enfield, M.D., '13, P&S 
1 1 6 South Liberty St. 
Cumberland, Md. 21502 

Richard Esslinger, M.D., '14, UofM 
3720 Glenmore Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21206 

John Evans, M.D., '03, BMC 
321 Regester Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21212 



January, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Remo Fabbi, M.D., '09, BMC 

1731 Markley St. 

Norristown, Pa. 

Dawson L. Farber, M.D., '13, BMC 

305 Woodlawn Rd. 

Baltimore, Md. 21210 

Lee K. Fargo, M.D., '15, P&S 

8155 Loch Raven Blvd. 

Baltimore, Md. 21204 

George L. Faucett, M.D., '03, P&S 

908 Walnut St. 

Gadsden, Ala. 35901 

Isaiah Fearing, M.D., UofM 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Lloyd H. Feick, M.D., UofM 

807 N. 10th St. 

Reading, Pa. 

Antonio Fernos-Isern, M.D., '15, P&S 

1710 New House Office Bldg. 

San Juan, P. R. 

Charles Wm. Finnerty, M.D., '13, UofM 

440 Broadway 

Somerville, Mass. 

Frank P. Firey. M.D., UofM 

2224N. E. 46thSt. 

Portland 13, Ore. 

Edward E. Fitzpatrick, M.D., '15, P&S 

317 36th Ave., N.E. 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 33704 

Paul N. Fleming, M.D., '13, UofM 

8627 Fenton St. 

Silver Spring, Md. 20910 

Edgar T. Flint, M.D., UofM 

Raritan, N. J. 

Ernest F. Flora, M.D., '13, UofM 

Boones Mill, Va. 

H. M. Foster. M.D., '10, UofM 

Ilchester Rd. 

Ellicott City. Md. 21043 

Ernest Wm. Frey, M.D., '12, UofM 
1928 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., '03, P&S 
1701 Eutaw PL, Apt. 1-B 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 



James C. Frye, M.D.,'11, 
407 First St. 
Williamsburg, Pa. 



BMC 



William L. Funkhouser, M.D., '04, UofM 
47 Peachtree Park Rd. 
Atlanta, Ga. 30309 

Charles W. Gardner, M.D., '01, UofM 
49 Toilsome Hill Rd. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 06604 

George W. Gault, M.D.. "10, UofM 
112 Walnut St. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

W. Frank Gemmill. M.D., '13, UofM 
121 W. Springettsbury Ave. 
York, Pa. 

Dawson Orme George, M.D., '12, UofM 
Denton, Md. 21629 

Henry J. Giamarino, M.D., "06, BMC 

291 Whitney Ave. 

New Haven, Conn. 0651 1 

William T. Gocke, M.D., UofM 
207 W. Pike St. 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Leo Goldbach, M.D., '05, UofM 
212 Stratford Rd. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Albert Goldey, M.D., "12, UofM 
210W. 101st St. 
New York 25, N. Y. 

Harris Goldman, M.D., '10, P&S 
3507 Garrison Blvd. 
Baltimore, Md. 21215 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., '13, UofM 
3109Marnat Rd. 
Baltimore, Md. 21208 

Luis Felipe Gonzalez, M.D., '15, P&S 

BoxB 

Rio Grande, P. R. 

Attie Thompson Gordon, M.D., '14, P&S 
Spencer, W. Va. 25276 

Gust AVE A. Gorisse, M.D., "II, BMC 
7329 Kings Run Rd. 
Dayton, Ohio 45459 

Arthur Richard Gould. M.D., '03, BMC 
70 El Portal 
Greenbrae, Calif. 94901 

Don U. Gould, M.D., "05, BMC 
N. Main St. 
Sherburne, N. Y. 13460 



xl 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



JLUMXr .ISSOCf.-lTIOM SECTION 



Archibai d \V. Graham. M.D.. UofM 

Box 563 

Chisholm. Minn. 

Garland Grazier, M.D., UofM 

Hollsopple, Pa. 

Charles Jacob Greenstein, M.D., '12, 

BMC 
300 Main St. 

New Britain, Conn. 06501 
George F. Grisinger. M.D., '10, P&S 
2861 Piedmont Rd. 
Charleston. W. Va. 
Julius E. Gross, M.D., "07, UofM 
9576 Collins Ave. 
Surfside, Fla. 33154 
Frank W. H.acktel, M.D., UofM 
122 W. Lafayette Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 
Glenn G. Haight, M.D., UofM 
Audubon, New Jersey 

Edward St. C. Hamilton, M.D., '11, UofM 
Oak Hill, W. Va. 

Nathan S. Hanellin, M.D., '11, UofM 
152 I82ndSt. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 11209 
Cecil Hassell, M.D., '14, UofM 
507 E. Carolina Ave. 
Crewe, Va. 

Cecil Starke Hassell, M.D., '14, UofM 
2939 S.W. 5th St. 
Miami, Fla. 33135 
Leonard Hays, M.D., '13, UofM 
5201 Baltimore Ave. 
Hyattsville,Md. 20781 
Howard Carrington Heilman, M.D., 

UofM 
Elderton, Pa. 

IsiDOR Heller, M.D., '13, UofM 
49 Brandon Rd. 
Upper Darby, Pa. 

Frederick H. Herrman, M.D., '07, UofM 
1710 E. 33rd St. 
Bahimore, Md. 21218 

Arthur Wm. Higgins, M.D., "07, UofM 

McLain Bldg. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Robert B. Hill, M.D., '15, UofM 

Southern Pines, N. C. 



Simon Wickline Hill, M.D., UofM 

Regent, N. Dakota 

John J. H. Hilton, M.D., UofM 

336 Haverhill St. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

IsADORE Hirschman, M.D., 'II, UofM 

618 11th Ave. 

Huntington, W. Va. 

Henry Hiram Hodgin, M.D., UofM 
Red Springs, N. C. 

Maxey Gregg Hoffman, M.D., UofM 
Bunker Hill, W. Va. 

John F. Hogan, M.D., 'II, UofM 
Bo.\ 113 
GibsonIsland,Md. 21056 

Howard Steele Holloway, M.D., '03, 

UofM 
Perryman, Md. 21 130 

Francis Hutchinson, M.D., '1 1, UofM 
485 E. Howard St. 
Pasadena, Calif. 91104 

Manuel R. Janer, M.D., '12, UofM 
697 West End Ave. 
New York 25, N. Y. 

Leon Peter Jankiewicz, M.D., UofM 
914 State St. 
Utica, N. Y. 

Harry E. Jenkins, M.D., '05, UofM 
Farmville, Va. 

Jesse J. Jenkins, M.D., '14, P&S 
Farmington, W. Va. 26571 

William H. Jenkins, M.D., '15, UofM 
2024 R St., N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. 

Frank Leslie Jennings, M.D., '11, P&S 
Medical Arts Bldg. 
Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Charles Sterling Jernigan, M.D., '97, 

BMC 
350 Boulevard S. E. 
Atlanta, Ga. 

William R. Johnson, M.D., '15, UofM 
403 Medical Arts Bldg. 
Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Kenneth B. Jones, M.D., '11, UofM 
Church Creek, Md. 21622 



January, 1966 



xli 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Solomon Chas. Katzoff, M.D., '40, UofM 

Keystone Realty Co. 

907 Whitelock St., 1st Floor Apt. 

Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Charles Hutchison Keesor, M.D., '11, 

UofM 
2302 Chapline St. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

Col. Lloyd A. Kefauver, M.D., '06, BMC 
665 S. Skinner Blvd. 
St. Louis, Mo. 63105 
Charles Keller, M.D., '98, UofM 
222 W. Monument St. 
Baltimore. Md. 21201 
Roy R. Kerkow, M.D., '15, Uof M 
505 Yakima St. 
Wenatchee, Wash. 

George S. M. Kieffer, M.D., '03, UofM 
1010 Leeds Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21229 
George Breon Kirk, M.D., UofM 
Kylertown, Pa. 
George Alfred Kohler, Jr., M.D., '12, 

P&S 
Smithburg.Md. 21783 
Lawrence B. Kolb. M.D., '08, UofM 
6645-32nd St., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20015 

Charles Byron Korns, M.D., UofM 

Sipesville, Pa. 

Harry Stanley Kuhlman, M.D., '14, P&S 

Sharptown, Md. 21861 

Julius Joseph Kvatsak, M.D., UofM 

3521 California Ave. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Anthony W. Lamy, M.D., '08, P&S 

585 Newark Ave. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 07208 

Alston Howard Lancaster, M.D., '03, 

UofM 
997 Main St. 
Worcester 3, Mass. 

Wm. E. Van Landingham, M.D., '05, BMC 

328 Dyer Ave. 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 33405 

Hubert Leonard Langer, M.D. '14, P&S 

212 Beach 69th St. 

Far Rockaway, N. Y. 1 1692 



Frank V. Langfitt, M.D., '07, BMC 

227 Carr Ave. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Philimon S. Lansdale, M.D., "02, UofM 

100 E. Church St. 

Frederick, Md. 21701 

Enrique Lasisse y Rivera, M.D., UofM 

Sabana Grande, P. R. 

Augustin R. Laugier, M.D., '14, P&S 

Bo.x 298 

San Juan, P. R. 00902 

Charles R. Law, Jr., M.D., '11, UofM 

Berlin, Md. 21811 

Oram R. La wry. Sr., M.D., '11, P&S 

23 Oak St. 

Rockland, Maine 04841 

J. Walter Layman, M.D., '10, BMC 

5 Public Square 

Hagerstown, Md. 21740 

Ernest Chas. Lehnert, M.D., '02, UofM 

3003 N. Charles St. 

Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Simon Geilech Lenzner, M.D., '12, UofM 

187 Waterman St. 

Providence 6, R. L 

Morris B. Levin, M.D., '14, UofM 
218 University Pkwy. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Addison LeRoy Lewis, M.D., UofM 
Havre de Grace, Md. 

Nolan D. C. Lewis. M.D., '14, UofM 

Rt.#5 

Frederick. Md. 21701 

Louis Herbert Limauro, M.D., '06, UofM 
374 Charles River Rd. 
Watertown, Mass. 

R. Basil Linger, M.D., '15, P&S 
321 W. Main St. 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Joseph Lipskey, M.D., '14, P&S 
Odenton ( A. A. Co. ) , Md. 2 1 1 1 3 

Bernard Livingston, M.D., '08, BMC 

535 S. Shore Dr. 

Miami Beach, Fla. 33141 

Thomas P. Lloyd. M.D., '96, BMC 
1030 Highland Ave. 
Shreveport, La. 71101 



xlii 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Arthur M. Loope. M.D., "98. BMC 
217 Sherbourne Rd. 
Syracuse. N. Y. 13224 

John Robert Lowerv. M.D.. UofM 
Salisbury', N. C. 

John F. Lutz, M.D., "14, UofM 
72 Southgate Ave. 
Annapolis, Md. 

John Vincent McAninch, M.D.. '14. P&S 
308 W. Lincoln Ave. 
McDonald, Pa. 15057 

Dr. Frederick L. McDonald, M.D., '13, 

UofM 
44 Northdown Rd. 
Alexandria, Va. 

Albert D. McFadden. M.D., '14, UofM 
4313 Marble Hall Rd. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 

William P. McGuire. M.D., UofM 
Wylliesburg, Va. 

Henry Hupp McIntire, M.D., UofM 
406 Green St. 
Connellsville, Pa. 

William R. McKenzie, M.D., '15, UofM 
117TaplowRd. 

Baltimore, Md. 21212 

RoscoE Drake McMillan, M.D., UofM 
Red Springs, N. C. 

C. W. McPherson, M.D., '10, UofM 
305 W. Front St. 
Burlington, N. C. 

Clyde C. Mack, M.D., '04, UofM 

872 24h St. 

Winter Haven, Fla. 33880 

Is.^ac M. Macks, M.D., '11, UofM 
3506 Liberty Heights Ave 
Baltimore, Md. 21215 

A. M. Magarian, M.D., '05, BMC 
330 W. Ocean Blvd. 
Long Beach, Calif. 90802 

Charles L. Magruder, M.D., '14, UofM 
lOlON.Bundy Drive 
Los Angeles, Calif. 90049 

John E. Maker, M.D., '14, P&S 

96 Third Aye. 

Long Branch, N. J. 07740 



Vernon L. Mahoney, M.D., '15. P&S 

2725 E. Exeter 

Tucson, Ariz. 85716 

Ernesto. Marr, M.D., '13, UofM 

516 Cathedral St. 

Baltimore, Md. 21201 

WiiMAM Reginald Marshall, M.D., UofM 

22 Broad St. 

Boston, Mass. 

William E. Martin, M.D., '09, UofM 

Randallstown, Md. 21133 

William T. Martin, M.D., UofM 

605 McDaniels Ave. 

Greenville, S. C. 

Erwin Mayer, M.D., '14, P&S 

TTie Esplanade Apts. 

Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Frederick W. A. Mayer, M.D., '03, UofM 

1830 James Ave. 

St. Paul 5, Minn. 

John L. Meeker, M.D., '03, UofM 

6 DeBarry Place 

Summit, N. J. 

M. L Mendeloff, M.D., '12, UofM 

Box 92 1 

Charleston 23, W. Va. 

Harry B. Messmore, M.D., UofM 

Addison, Pa. 

Challice Haydon Metcalfe, M.D., '14, 

UofM 
Sudlersville, Md. 21668 
Isidor Michel, M.D., '11, UofM 
870 5th Ave. 
NewYork, N. Y. 10021 
Carl F. Miller, M.D., '04, BMC 
5554 Delmar 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Samuel Miller, M.D., '12, BMC 
2807 Arthur St. 
Hollywood, Fla. 33020 

William C. Miller, M.D., UofM 

Gaithersburg, Md. 

David C. Mock, M.D., '04, P&S 

215CajonSt. 

Redlands, Calif. 92373 

Daniel B. Moffett, M.D., UofM 

1 1 50 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



January, 1966 



xliii 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Alfred N. Moore, M.D., '03, BMC 

16 Pike St. 

Oakland, 111. 61943 

Emmett a. Moore, M.D., '08, UofM 

Box 247 

Newark, Ohio 

Col. Alfred Mordecai, M.D., '14, UofM 

806 S. Hawthorne Rd. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Charles G. Morgan, M.D., UofM 

156 Santa Barbara St. 

Corpus Christi, Texas 

Samuel J. Morris, M.D., UofM 

205 Kingwood St. 

Morgantown, W. Va. 

Theodore Morrison, M.D., '15, UofM 

100 W. Cold Spring Lane, Apt. 704 West 

Baltimore, Md. 21210 

C. H. Moses, M.D., UofM 

919 Linden Ave. 

Sharon, Pa. 

Charles L. Mowrer, M.D., '13, UofM 
159 W.Washington St. 
Hagerstown, Md. 2 1 740 

Leo p. Musser, M.D., '13, UofM 
500 Vine Hill Way 
Martinez, Calif. 94553 

Charles W. Myers, M.D., "15, UofM 
R. D. 18, Box 256 
Indianapolis, Ind. 46224 

William Edgar Myles, M.D., UofM 
White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 

Victor C. Nah, M.D., '13, UofM 
301 North Van Buren St. 
Wilmington, Del. 19805 

Walter Irving Neller, M.D., UofM 
121 Wickhan Ave. 
Middletown, N. Y. 

Benjamin Newhouse, M.D., '12, UofM 
4213 16thSt.,N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20011 

Walter S. Niblett, M.D., '11, UofM 
1141 Gypsy Lane East 
Bahimore, Md. 21204 

Charles Francis Nicol, M.D., '13, P&S 
63 Prospect Pk. W. 
Brooklyn 15, N. Y. 



Juan J. Nogueras, M.D., '15, P&S 

468 Caribe St. 

Box 1214 

San Juan, P. R. 

Lester D. Norris, M.D.. '08, UofM 

Fairmont General Hospital 

Fairmont, W.Va. 26551 

Arthur M. O'Connor, M.D., '09, UofM 

Lee, Massachusetts 

John Charles O'Neil, M.D., '14, UofM 

P. O. Box 158 

Savannah, Ga. 31402 

Walter A. Ostendorf, M.D., '13, UofM 

420 West Elsmere 

San Antonio 12, Texas 

John Ostro, M.D., '11, UofM 

5234 Dorchester Ave. 

Chicago, III. 60615 

Samuel Watson Page, M.D., UofM 

Greenwood, S. C. 

Julius G. Paider, M.D., '00, BMC 

405 E. 72nd St. 

New York, N.Y. 10021 

Harold H. Palmer, M.D., UofM 

Plymouth, N. H. 

William N. Palmer, M.D., '05, P&S 

P. O. Box 558 

Easton, Md. 21601 

Paul Jones Parker, M.D., UofM 

Hampton, Va. 

James B. Parramore, M.D., '09, UofM 

523 Whitehead St. 

Key West, Fla. 33040 

Benjamin Parvey, M.D., UofM 

636 Beacon St. 

Boston. Mass. 

T. E. Patteson, M.D., '09, UofM 

Dillwyn, Virginia 

Ernest M. Perry, M.D.. UofM 

125 Sunset Ave. 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Charles J. Pflueger, M.D., '05, BMC 

460 S. Ardmore St. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 90005 

George Henry Pflueger, M.D., '06, BMC 

40 Dole Ave. 

Crystal Lake, III. 60014 



xliv 



Vol. 51. No. 1 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Lawrence D. Phillips, M.D., '19, UofM 
3301 Newport Gap Pike 
Wilmington, Dei. 19808 

Wn I lAM Garfield Phh lips, M.D., UofM 
Skiatook. Okla. 

George Piness, M.D., "13, UofM 
240 S. LaCienga Blvd. 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 90211 

Linn F. Playse, M.D., "06, UofM 
4340 Juanita Way. South 
St. Petersburg 5, Fla. 

Walter W. Point, M.D., "13, UofM 
Bo.\ 2567 
Charleston 29, W. Va. 

John T. H. Powers, M.D., "10, UofM 
55 West St. 
Leominster, Mass. 

Ivan Emerson Pratt, M.D., UofM 
Millerton, Pa, 

Wilmer Marshall Priest, M.D., '09. 

UofM 
55 West 184th St. 
New York 28, N. Y. 

Manuel E. Pujadaz-Diaz, M.D., '14, P&S 
1611 Colon Ave. 
Sancturce, P. R. 00911 

Clayton T. Ralls, M.D., "04, P&S 

Box 608 

Winfield, Kansas 67156 

Watson S, Rankin, M.D., "01, UofM 
Methodist Home 
Charlotte 5, N. C. 

Moses Raskin, M.D., '15, UofM 
622 1 Greenspring Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21209 

Edwin R. Raymaley, M.D., '04, UofM 
1034 South Ave. 
Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

Harry Cornelius Raysor, M.D., '13, UofM 
St. Matthews, S. C. 

Robert P. Reagan, M.D., '08, BMC 

345 Goundry St. 

North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Ralph G. Reed, M.D., '08, BMC 
330 Elmore St. 
Central Islip, N. Y. 



CoL. Walter I. Richards, M.D., '14, UofM 

Box 11, Route 4 

Charlottesville, Va. 

Capt. Willard J. RiDDicK, M.D., '05, UofM 

7426 Dominican St. 

New Orleans, La. 70118 

Harry Young Righton, M.D.. '07, UofM 

401 E. 45th St. 

Savannah, Ga. 3 1 405 

John Wm. Robertson, M.D., '09, UofM 

Onancock, Va. 

Joseph R. Robertson, M.D., '10, UofM 

1700 Johns Road, Ext. 

Augusta, Ga. 30904 

Jacob Roemer, M.D., '06, BMC 

465 S. Westgate Ave. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 90049 

Joseph U. Rohr, M.D,, '14, P&S 

3705 Bohan St., N.E. 

Roanoke, Va. 24012 

George Rosenbaum, M.D., '05, BMC 

7608 Coventry Ave. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19126 

George Rosenbaum, M.D., '05, UofM 

1030 Rock Creek Drive 

Wyncote, Pa. 

Jacob L. Rosenstein, M.D., '05, P&S 

568 Bergen Ave. 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Willum T. Ruark, M,D., '15, UofM 

Pinecrest Sanatorium 

Beckley, W. Va. 25801 

Louis Rubin, M.D., '10, UofM 

10510 Euclid Ave. 

Cleveland 6, Ohio 

John G. Runkel, M.D., '10, UofM 

715 Charing Cross Rd. 

Baltimore, Md. 21229 

Raymond Harrison Ryder, M.D., '13, 

UofM 
48 Central Ave. 
Waterbury, Conn. 06702 
Lucius C. Saunders, M.D., '15, UofM 
20 S. Dudley St. 
Memphis, Tenn. 38303 
Harry Schnuck, M.D., '15, UofM 
1203SanDiegiatoSt. 
Encinitas, Calif. 92024 



January, 1966 



xlv 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Fred C. Schumacher, M.D., '05, P&S 

Chichester Rd. 

Phoenicia, N. Y. 12464 

Leonard O. Schwartz, M.D., '12, P&S 

3421 Pennsylvania Ave. 

Weirton, W. Va. 

William H. Scruggs, M.D., '13, UofM 
Andrews, N. C. 

George H. Seaks, M.D., '04, UofM 
New Oxford, Pa. 

Elias C. Segarra, M.D., '13, P&S 
1803 Ponce de Leon Ave. 
Santurce, P. R. 00929 

Herman Seidel, M.D., '10, P&S 
2404 Eutaw Place 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Roger K. Sell, M.D., '13, BMC 
Torrington, Wyoming 82240 

Charles I. Shaffer, M.D., '07, BMC 
725 East Main St. 
Somerset, Pa. 

Maurice E. Shamer, M.D., '10, UofM 
3300 West North Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21216 

Albert C. Shannon, M.D., '12, UofM 
R. D. 1, Box 83 
Mayport, Pa. 

J. D. Sharp, M.D., '12, UofM 
Box 849, Shifting Shadows 
Twenty-Nine Palms, Calif. 92277 

Arthur A. Shawkey, M.D., '00, P&S 
207 Beuregard St. 
Charleston 1 , W. Va. 

Richard O. Shea, M.D., '14, P&S 
25 Sanford Place 
Bridgeport, Conn. 06604 

Frank E. Shipley, M.D., '15, UofM 
Savage, Md. 

Ivy G. Shirkey, M.D., '14, P&S 
Albemarle Apts. 
1830 17thSt.,N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20009 

David Silberman, M.D., '12, UofM 
:^508 Temple Garden Apts. 
2601 Madison Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 



Albert George Singewald, M.D., '02, 

UofM 
1613E. North Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21213 
John Andrew Skladowsky, M.D., '12, 

UofM 
Box 181, Route # 1 
Severna Park, Md. 21 146 
Henry Oscar Sloane, M.D., '08, BMC 
23 S. Hillside Ave. 
Ventnor, N. J. 08406 
Hamilton J. Slusher, M.D., '13, UofM 
Rt. 4, Box 118 
Fredericksburg, Va. 22401 
Arthur Charles Smith, M.D., '10, P&S 
90 Deer Hill Ave. 
Danbury, Conn. 06810 
ZiBA L. Smith, M.D., '06, P&S 
West Nanticoke, Pa. 
Earl H. Snavely, M.D., '05, BMC 
4800 San Amaro 
Coral Gables, Fla. 33146 

Frederick Snyder, M.D., '08, UofM 
44 Clinton Ave., 
Kingston, N. Y. 

Dallas C. Speas, M.D., '11, UofM 
2598 Reynolds Rd. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., '10, UofM 
3900 N. Charles St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Edward Wharton Sprague, M.D., '03, P&S 
86 Washington St. 
Newark, N. J. 

Clarke J. Stallworth, M.D., '12, UofM 
Thomaston, Ala. 36783 

Byron Wm. Steele, M.D., '14, P&S 

Box 248 

Mullens, W. Va. 24863 

Fred E. Steele, Jr., M.D., '07, UofM 
Florence, Mass. 

Paul Beadle Steele, M.D., '15, P&S 
7059 Jenkins Arcade 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 

Jacob J. Steinfelder, M.D., '08, BMC 
924 West End Ave. 
New York City, N. Y. 



xlvi 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



ALUMXI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Thomas VVm. Stevenson, M.D., '08, P&S 

4421 Montaire Ave. 

Long Beach, Calif. 90808 

George L. Stickney, M.D., '10, Uol'M 

1 04 West University Pkwy. 

Baltimore, Md. 21210 

Washington Waters Stonestreet, M.D., 

•06, UofM 
231 Locust Ave. 
Fairmont, West Va. 

Frank Gregorv Strahan. M.D., "14, UofM 
Williamsville, Vt. 

George L. Straub, M.D., '11, UofM 
41 17 Anderson Rd. 
CoralGables.Fla. 33146 
Charles Franklin Strosnider, M.D., '09, 

UofM 
P. O. Box 245 
Goldsboro, N. C. 
B. F. Tefft, M.D., '05, UofM 
185 Washington St. 
West Warwick, Rhode Island 
Bernard Osc.\r Thomas, Sr., M.D., '06, 

UofM 
228 N. Market St. 
Frederick, Md. 21701 
John M. Thorup, M.D., '15, P&S 
4927 N. E. 30th Ave. 
Portland, Oregon 

Homer U. Todd, M.D., "08, UofM 
2108 St. Paul St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 
Grafton Dent Townshend, M.D., '11, 

UofM 
1141 Roscomore Rd. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 
William J. Trainor, M.D., '03, BMC 
326 Virginia Circle 
Wilmington, Ohio 
Letcher E. Trent, M.D., '10, P&S 
209 DeWitt Rd. 
Syracuse 3, N. Y. 

Richard Trevaskis, Sr., M.D., '11, UofM 
220 Baltimore Ave. 
Cumberland, Md. 21502 
William H. Triplett, M.D., '11, BMC 
1038 LakemontRd. 
Baltimore, Md. 21228 



Karl H. Trippett, M.D.,'11, P&S 

Grafton, W. Va. 

Ralph C. Purnell, M.D., '10, UofM 

Great Neck Farm 

Stevensville, Md. 21666 

Jesse R. Tuckwiller, M.D., '10, P&S 

223 Monroe St. 

Fairmont, W. Va. 

Alfred Ullman, M.D., '02, P&S 

1 702 Eutaw Place 

Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Wm. Lawrence Van Sant, M.D., '10, 

UofM 
Hinton, W. Va. 

Thurman Elroy Vass, M.D., '14, P&S 
Bo.x 1 67 

Bluefield,W.Va. 24701 
Clyde W. Vick, M.D., '05, P&S 
2117 Jefferson St. 
Bluefield, W. Va. 

Frederick J. Waas, M.D., '05, UofM 
1 804 Mayview Rd. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 32210 
Joseph Judson Waff, M.D., '15, UofM 
Box 235 

Shenandoah, Va. 

Adam. C. Walkup, M.D., '09, UofM 
33 Water St. 

St. Augustine, Fla. 32084 
Wm. Benj. Warthen, M.D., '05, UofM 
Davisboro, Ga. 31018 
Earl B. Weible, M.D., '10, BMC 
Abercrombie, N. Dakota 
Meyer A. Weinberg, M.D., '04, UofM 
1724 Eutaw Place 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 
Parker M. Wentz, M.D., '06, P&S 
752 Kelly Drive 
York, Pa. 

Cleveland D. Whelchel, M.D., '13, UofM 
1735 Riverside Drive 
Gainesville, Ga. 30501 
Edwin Vignes Whitaker, M.D., '12, UofM 
Box 625 

Baton Rouge, La. 70821 
Col. Wm. A. Wickline, M.D., '95, P&S 
232 Rutherford Drive 
Danville, Calif. 94526 



January, 1966 



xlvii 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Java C. Wilkins, M.D., '11, UofM 

Box 446 

Haw River, N. C. 27258 

David T. Williams, M.D., '14, UofM 

21 Hall Ave. 

Newark, Ohio 

Louis V. Williams, M.D., '11, P&S 

Route 7 

York, Pa. 

Mayes B. Williams, M.D., '12, P&S 

2000 Eoff St. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Ernest L. Wilson, M.D., '11, BMC 

10509 Stone Ave. 

Seattle 33, Wash. 

Walter Michael Winters, M.D., 

UofM 
288 Broadway 
Paterson, N. J. 

Francis R. Wise, M.D., '08, P&S 
129 E. Market St. 
York, Pa. 17401 



'10, 



Walter D. Wise, M.D., '06, P&S 

most. Paul St. 

Baltimore, Md. 21202 

John I. Wiseman, M.D., '07, P&S 

215 Annie St. 

Orlando, Fla. 32806 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., '14, UofM 

Medical Arts Bldg. 

Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Eugene Bascom Wright, M.D., '09, UofM 

340 Buckhannon Ave. 

Clarksburg, W.Va. 26301 

Silas G. Wright, M.D., '04, UofM 

Shawboro, N. C. 

Eugene Zeller, M.D., '15, UofM 

2739 Eastern Ave. 

Baltimore, Md. 21224 

Mark V. Ziegler, M.D., '15, UofM 

OIney, Md. 20832 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D.,'11,P&S 

400 Coral Way 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33301 



xlviii 



Vol. 51, No. 1 



BULLETIN School of Medicine 
Universift/ of MarijJaiid 



VOLUME 51 



APRIL 1966 



NUMBER 2 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



ORIGINAL ARTICLES 



A Correlative Study of Chronic Arterial Hypertension and Pregnancy - 
Isadore G. Ances, M.D., Arthur Haskins, M.D. 



Benign Localized Fibrous Mesothelioma of Pleur 
Joseph Milieu, M.D. 



Chromosomal Mosaicism in Gonadal Dysgenesis — Report of a Case- 
Hans-Dieter Tauberl, M.D., Erica F. Moszkowski, M.D. 



BOOK REVIEWS 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 

Dean's Letter , 



Dr. Mayer Appointed to Neurology Faculty- 
Faculty Notes 



Medical School Applicant Admission Policies — A Faculty Problem- 
Dietrich C. Smith, M.D. 



Annual Report of Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology- 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 

President's Letter 

Class Notes . 

Deaths 

April. 1966 



Medical education needs your dollars 
to stay strong and free . . . 




Give to the 
scliool of your choice 
through AMEF 



To train the doctors of tomorrow, 
the nation's medical schools must have 
your help today. It is a physician's uniqu 
privilege and responsibility to replenisb 
his own ranks with men educated 
to the highest possible standards. 
Invest in the future health of the nation an 
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Chicago 10, Illinois 



A Correlative Study of Chronic Arterial 
Hypertension and Pregnancy 

ISADORE G. ANCES, M.D., and ARTHUR L. HASKINS, M.D. 



Toxemia of pregnancy is an acute 
illness of pregnant women and has been 
recognized as a clinical entity for several 
hundreds of years. Toxemia of pregnancy 
occurs in the United States with a fre- 
quency of about six per cent of all preg- 
nancies. The sun,-ival of the patient with 
uncomplicated preeclampsia is 100%. The 
survival of the patient with eclamptic tox- 
emia is about 85% which is roughly equiv- 
alent to the survival rate of the patient 
with Stage I carcinoma of the uterine 
cervix. 

The perinatal mortality in preeclamptic 
toxemia increases to 50% over average 
rates. In eclamptic toxemia the perinatal 
mortality increases approximately 200%. 

Despite the frequency of the disease, 
the long period of its clinical recognition, 
the high maternal and fetal mortality, 
toxemia of pregnancy remains a modern 
day mystery. The etiology of toxemia of 
pregnancy is unknown. The diagnosis of 
toxemia of pregnancy is made by exclu- 
sion, necessitating the consideration of 
other disease processes causing hyperten- 
sion, albuminuria, edema, and convulsions. 
The treatment of toxemia of pregnancy is 
symptomatic. Although the immediate 
prognosis for mother and child is recog- 
nizably poor, the remote prognosis for the 
mother has been under debate for many 
years. 

In recent years some of our concepts 
about toxemia have changed, particularly 
in regard to the prognosis in toxemia. 
From an era in which many considered 

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 
University of Maryland School of Medicine. 



that the recurrence rate of the disease was 
negligible, we have now come to know 
that there is a significant rate of recur- 
rence. 

In the consideration of the remote prog- 
nosis of toxemia of pregnancy, an ex- 
tremely practical problem, divided opin- 
ions have indicated that toxemia of preg- 
nancy does not cause permanent hyperten- 
sion, does not predispose to permanent 
hypertension or worsen permanent hyper- 
tension.'' 2. 3 On the other hand, equally 
voluble groups maintain that toxemia of 
pregnancy may result in persistent hyper- 
tension, may worsen permanent hypterten- 
sion and may predispose to permanent 
hypertension.''' ^' *> '' The incidence of per- 
manent hypertension following toxemia of 
pregnancy seemed to increase if pre- 
eclampsia was present for a period of time 
in excess of four weeks. This observation 
was refuted by the "toxemia does not 
cause permanent hypertension" school 
with the observation that the patient who 
developed permanent hypertension follow- 
ing prolonged toxemia, was in reality an 
individual with preexisting nonpregnancy 
hypertensive disease. 

The current study was undertaken with 
a dedication to prove that toxemia of preg- 
nancy does not predispose to permanent 
hypertension nor cause permanent hyper- 
tension. It was reasoned that since toxemia 
of pregnancy occurs only in pregnant 
women, that an analysis of pregnant and 
nonpregnant populations, were they to 
show similar rates of hypertension, would 
indicate that toxemia does not influence 



April, 1966 



17 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



post pregnancy hypertensive rates. It was 
anticipated that the nonpregnant popula- 
tion and pregnant population would have 
identical incidences of permanent arterial 
hypertension. 

A trial run with the obstetrical data at 
the University of Maryland Hospital indi- 
cated that such a study would be feasible. 
The aid of the Obstetrical Statistical Co- 
operative was then enlisted since the 
grouping of data required a relatively large 
sample for significance. 

Material 

The clinical material was collected 
through the Obstetrical Statistical Coop- 
erative* for the years 1951-1960. The total 
sample of 288,874 pregnancies was ana- 
lysed. The pregnancies were grouped ac- 
cording to age ; less than 20 years, 20-29 
years, 30-39 years and 40 and over years. 
Pregnancies were also grouped according 
to parity; para 0, para 1-3, para 4-6, and 
para 7 and over as in Table I. The material 



Table 11 



Parity 





1-3 


4-6 


7 + 




Age 
in Years 










Total 


<20 


24,497 


10,943 


76 


11 


35,527 


20-29 


56,980 


101,550 


13,664 


1,412 


173,606 


30-39 


9,872 


46,391 


13,673 


4,518 


74,454 


40 + 


560 


2,508 


1,213 


1,006 


5,287 


TOTAL 


91,909 


161,392 


28,626 


6,947 


288,874 



Total study sample for occurrence of 
hypertension relative to pregnancy. 



* The obstetrical statistical cooperative was organized 
through the eflforts of Dr. Schuyler Kohl. Dr. D. Frank 
Kaltreider has been responsible for the continuation of 
the program at Maryland. The cooperative has a mem- 
bership of 18 hospitals. Each obstetrical department 
reports its annual experience to the central organization 
at the State University of New York, Downstate Med- 
ical Center. The accumulated data is stored and made 
available to member institutions upon request. 



Parity 





1-3 


4-6 


7-1- 




Age 
in Years 










Total 


<20 


393 


173 


3 





569 


20-29 


678 


1,515 


547 


80 


2,820 


30-39 


278 


1,317 


727 


326 


2,648 


40-1- 


40 


160 


110 


78 


388 


TOTAL 


1,389 


3,165 


1,387 


484 


6,425 



Occurrence of hypertension 
relative to age and parity. 



was viewed according to non-white and 
white populations. The definition of hy- 
pertension is that used by the Obstetrical 
Statistical Cooperative of arterial pressure 
of over 138 systolic and 88 diastolic. The 
occurrence of hypertension is shown in 
Table II. Significance of data was assessed 
by the Chi-squared statistical method. 

Results 

The non-white population consisted of 
30% of the sample. Preliminary evalua- 
tion of hypertensive trends indicated a 
greater incidence of hypertension in the 
non-white population than in the white 
population. The correlative trends of age 
and gestation were similar in both. The 
groups were combined to insure signifi- 
cance. 

To test the validity of the material in 
the reflection of established trends in the 
development of hypertension, the incidence 
of hypertension relative to patient age was 
plotted as in Figure 1. There is no increase 
in hypertension in the younger age groups 
to 29 years. At the level of 30-39 years a 
trend toward increasing hypertension is 
initiated and is further established in the 
40 and over year age group. 

With proof that our data reflected at 
least one established factor in the develop- 



18 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



ANCES, HASKINS— ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND PREGNANCY 



A9t<20 eO-29 30-39 40*- 



Fiff. 1. The incidence of hypertension relative 
to patient age. 



Fig. 2. The incidence of hypertension relative 
to patient parity. 





*gl <20 20-89 50-39 40* 



Tig. 3. The incidence of hypertension relative 
to patient parity and a^e. 



Fig. 4. The incidence of hypertensic 
to patient parity and age. 



merit of hypertension, the next step was 
to show that pregnancy and its inevitable 
comphcation of toxemia did not reflect a 
similar increase in hypertension with in- 
creasing numbers of pregnancies. 

Accordingly the data was arranged to 
compare parity and incidence of hyperten- 
sion as indicated in Figure 2. The nulli- 
parous patient showed the least hyperten- 
sion, the para 7 and over group showed 
the greatest incidence of hypertension, 
with the intermediate groups indicating 
the same trend. Since it was not possible 
to separate the age factor in this graphic 
analysis from increasing parity, it was 
assumed that the trend of increasing hy- 
pertension could be the result of influence 
of aging in itself. 

The data was then arranged to compare 
nulliparous hypertension and parous hy- 



pertension at all age levels. As indicated 
in Figure 3, the incidence of hypertension 
was greater in the parous patient than in 
the nulliparous patient at all age levels 
with the exception of the age group at less 
than 20 years. At this age, the incidence 
of hypertension in both groups, regardless 
of the status of parity, was 1.6%. 

Finally, in an attempt to ascertain possi- 
ble influences of increasing parity on the 
incidence of hypertension, each of the four 
parity groups were tabulated and plotted 
as indicated in Figure 4. At each level 
there is a trend toward increasing hyper- 
tension with increasing parity, although it 
is quite apparent that this trend is not 
established until the level of para 4 and 
over is reached. There is no real difference 
in the incidence of hypertension between 
the para and para 1-3 groups at any age 
level. 



April, 1966 



19 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Conclusions 

It is immediately apparent that the 
premise as originally defined: toxemia 
of pregnancy or pregnancy is not associ- 
ated with an increased rate of permanent 
hypertension, could not be proved. In fact, 
the data analyzed indicated that quite the 
contrary was true. With increasing preg- 
nancies, the rate of permanent arterial 
hypertension increased in all age groups 
over 19 years. The trend was most marked 
in the 20-29 and the 30-39 years groups. 

It is of interest to note that Schreier, et 
al.,^ observed that most women developing 
permanent elevation of blood pressure did 
so after three pregnancies and at least two 
episodes of toxemia. Our data confirms 
that trends toward permanent hyperten- 
sion are not established until parity or 
greater than three has been attained. 

Aging and its effect on the development 
of hypertension are well known. The data 
presented indicates that the age factor is 
easily demonstrable. Correction of the 
data for the age factor was accomplished. 
Comparison of the number of patients in 
our data who probably had toxemia of 
pregnancy to the corrected hypertension 
rate indicates that the incidence of perma- 
nent hypertension following toxemia of 
pregnancy could be 11.1%. This compares 
quite favorably to the findings of Schreier, 
et al., in which it is indicated that 11.3% 
of 239 patients with toxemia of pregnancy 
were found to have permanent hyperten- 
sive disease. 

The data and analysis presented is at 
variance with the conclusions of others 



who consider that pregnancy and toxemia 
of pregnancy is never followed by perma- 
nent arterial hypertension. 

Summary 

Data obtained through the Obstetrical 
Statistical Cooperative provided 288,874 
pregnancies for study. The pregnancies 
were divided into parity and age groups. 
Comparisons of the various age and parity 
groups indicated an increased incidence of 
permanent hypertension with increasing 
age and parity. 

References 

1. IsENHouR, C. E., KuDER, K., and Dill, L. 
V. : The Effect of Parity on the Average Blood 
Pressure and on the Incidence of Hypertension. 
Am. J. M. Sc. 203:333, 1942. 

2. Barnes, J., and Browne, F. J. : Incidence 
of Hypertension in Nulliparous and Parous Wo- 
men in Relation to the Remote Prognosis of 
Toxemia of Pregnancy. /. Obst. & Gynec. Brit. 
Em/^.. 52:1, 1945. 

3. DiECKMAN, W. J., Smitter, R. C, and 
RvNKiEwicz, L. : Pre-Eclampsia — Eclampsia 
Does Not Cause Permanent Vascular Renal Dis- 
ease. Am. J. Obst. & Gynec, 64:850, 1952. 

4. Harris, J. W. : The After-Effects of Late 
Toxemias of Pregnancy. Bull. Johns Hopkins 
Hasp., 35:103, 1924. 

5. Peckham, C. H. : Chronic Nephritis Fol- 
lowing Eclampsia. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hasp., 
45:176, 1929. 

6. Schreier, P. C, Adams, J. Q., Turner, 
H. B., and Smith, M. J. : Toxemia of Preg- 
nancy as an Etiological Factor in Hypertensive 
Vascular Disease. /. A. M. A., 159:105, 1955. 

7. Chesley, L. C, Annitto, J. E., and Cos- 
GROVE, R. A. : Prognostic Significance of Recur- 
rent Toxemia of Pregnancy. Obst. & Gynec, 
23:874, 1964. 



20 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



Beiiiffii Localized Fibrous Mesollielioma of Pleura 

Clinical ('onsiderations and Report of a Case 

JOSEPH MIUETT, M.D.* 



MESOTHELIOMAS of the pleura for 
a great many years had been considered 
a pathological curiosity. They were a 
perplexing group of tumors and there 
were numerous opinions regarding their 
clinical, roentgenological and pathological 
features, particularly the latter. 

Klemperer and Rabin, i and Stout and 
Murray,- and Stout and Humadi^ made 
notable contributions toward the patho- 
logical clarification of these tumors. 
Clagett et al^ and Foster and Ackerman^ 
aided in delineating some of the clinical 
features of this pathological entity. 

The purpose of this report is to call 
attention to the clinical features of this 
relatively rare condition. Rubin'' has 
stated that the pleura is rarely the site 
of primary tumors. Harrison, '' CecU and 
Loeb* and Ackerman and Regato** devote 
scarcely one paragraph to these con- 
ditions, while Roberts^" mentions them 
not at all. It is apparent that the path- 
ologist and the surgeon have had the 
greatest pre-occupation with this con- 
dition. 

Case Report 

A 53 year old man, complained of a grippy 
feeling of several days duration. There were 
no other signs or symptoms. The system re- 
views were negative and there was no weight 
loss. There were no previous illnesses or 
hospitalizations. He did not smoke. Eighteen 
months ago a routine physical examination, in- 
cluding blood chemistries, electrocardiograph, 
and fluoroscopy were normal. 



Read before the section on Internal medicine, 
Nassau Hospital, July 14, 1965 

* Associate attending physician, department of 
internal medicine, Nassau Hospital, Mineola, 
N. Y. 



He was six feet tall and weighed 180 lbs. 
Physical examination showed only a slightly 
injected throat. On fluoroscopy of the chest 
a smooth mass, which moved with respiration, 
was seen in the right hemithorax lying on the 
diaphragm adjacent to the mediastinum. 
Radiologic study revealed a large lohulated 
mass approximately 10 cm. in diameter in the 
right posterior thorax distinct from the con- 
tour of the posterior aspect of the diaphragm. 
The lesion did not involve the ribs (see Figs. 
1 and 2). 

The patient entered Nassau Hospital on 
December 20, 1964. The chemistries, including 
the blood sugar, the blood count and urine, 
roentgenographs of the abdomen, large in- 
testine and kidneys, and the electrocardiograph 






Fisr. 1. AP view of chest. 



April, 1966 



21 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 





Fie. 2. Lateral X-ray of chest. 



Fig. 3. Lateral tomogram of chest. 



were all normal. Tomograms of the chest 
clearly delineated the mass in the right chest 
(Fig. 3). 

Pulmonary function studies revealed a slight 
diminution in lung volume but there was good 
ventilatory function. Bronchoscopy was en- 
tirely normal and there was no compression 
of the bronchial tree. Sputum collected and 
later smeared showed an abundance of mucus, 
a few superficial squamous cells and a number 
of histiocytes and polynuclears. Tumor cells 
could not be found. 

On December 29, 1964 the patient was 
operated upon. The chest was entered through 
a right posterior lateral incision in the seventh 
interspace. A large encapsulated tumor was 
found in the pleural cavity, attached to the 
visceral surface of the right lower lobe by 
a pleural-like band. This was simply divided, 
the tumor easily removed, and a tube was 
inserted into the pleural cavity. The patient 
stood the procedure well. 

Follow-up chest films showed the tube in 
place, resection of one rib, some slight eleva- 
tion of the right diaphragm, the lungs well 
expanded and no evidence of pleural fluid. 



Pathologic Studies 

Specimen: Mediastinal Tumor. 

Gross: The specimen was a bulky somewhat 
pyramidal-shaped mass weighing 462 grams and 
measuring 13.5 x 13 x 7 cm. (Fig. 4). The 
outer surface was for the most part grayish- 
pink, smooth and glistening. However there 
were few irregular zones where the glistening 
capsule had been denuded. There were other 
areas of coarse nodularity. The entire mass had 
a soft, rubbery consistency. Repeated incisions 
disclosed a solid lobulated pale yellowish-tan 
glistening tumor tissue. The cut surface had a 
mucinous feel. One of the incisions passed 
through a 4 X 2.2 cm. sharply demarcated 
pale yellow soft zone of necrosis. There was 
considerable variation in the size of the lobules, 
some being but a few mms. in diameter. This 
lobular pattern was produced by shallow 
branching fissures (Fig. 5). 

Microscopic: Numerous sections removed 
from various areas showed a tumor composed 
almost entirely of small spindle shaped cells, 
some arranged in fascicular pattern. There 
was varying density of the cells. In some areas 
they were crowded together, in others they 



22 



Vol 51. No. ? 



MILLETT— MESOTHELIOMA OF PLEURA 





Fig. 4. Fib 



bulky tumor. 



were more loosely arranged. In all parts of 
the tumor there were varying amounts of 
collagen fibrous tissue arranged in strands. In 
a few of the sections there were split-like 
spaces principally distributed at the periphery 
of the growth. These spaces were lined by 
cuboidal or flattened cells suggesting meso- 
thelium. TTie sections through the necrotic 
zone showed a sharp demarcation between the 
dead tissue and the adjacent viable growth. 
There was a zone of dense collagen fibrous 
tissue at the periphery of the necrosis. A small 
venous channel contained an organizing throm- 
bus. All of the tumor cells were uniform in 
size. The nuclei lacked any evidence of malig- 
nant change. Mitoses could not be found 
(Fig. 6 and 7). 

Diagnosis was a benign type of mesothelioma 
of the pleura. 

Several slides were sent to Arthur Purdy 
Stout, M.D., department of surgical pathology. 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia 
University, for consultation, who, in personal 
communication stated — "This tumor is a 
characteristic benign fibrous mesothelioma of 
the pleura. It has the usual gross features and 
the 'patternless pattern' that are so distinctive 
of mesothelioma." 

Diagnosis: Benign fibrous mesothelioma of 
the pleura. 

The patient made an uneventful recovery 
and left the hospital on lanuary 7, 1965. He 
was last seen in the office on February 1, 1966. 




Fiz. 6. Photomicroeraph of tamor (100 X). 



April, 1966 



23 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEniCINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 












,y 






j*' »>. it, '-' ''ff.-J, *'^>/* • i 




Fie. 7. Photomicrograph of tumor (400 X). 
Note Fibroblasts 

He was back at work on full duty and had no 
complaints. 

Discussion 

Benign fibrous mesothelioma is a 
localized, well encapsulated, sometimes 
lobulated fibrous tumor of the pleura, 
arising mainly from the visceral pleura, 
occasionally from the parietal pleura and 
rarely from the pleura of the interlobar 
fissures. It projects outward into the 
pleural cavity held by a stalk. This 
soUtary type is usually benign. Micro- 
scopically it contains collagen fibrous 
tissue, spindle shaped cells and meso- 
thelial cells and is histologically benign. 

Its counterpart, the diffuse type of the 
pleural mesothelioma, is highly maUg- 
nant. It arises from the pleura but invades 
sub-pleurally. Microscopically it is histo- 



logically malignant and contains epithelial 
cells and mitotic figures. This type of 
tumor metastasizes. A third type is a 
localized tumor, well encapsulated, but 
which may contain some malignant cells. 
This should be classified as a mixed type 
of tumor, but it is benign in action. ii 

Mesotheliomas may occur in other 
areas of the body — the peritoneum, ^^ tjjg 
male and female urogenital tracts — the 
epididymus, the vas, the round ligament, 
Fallopian tube, canal of Nuck, and on 
the serosa of the uterus."' ^^ We are not 
concerned with these tumors except they 
may possess in common with the fibrous 
and diffuse mesotheliomas of the pleura 
the property of producing hypoglycemia, 
which will be discussed later. 

The incidence of pleural mesotheliomas 
has been difficult to evaluate because of 
the terminology and conflicting descrip- 
tions applied to these tumors prior to the 
work of Klemperer and Rabin and Stout 
and Murray. They have been called and 
described variously as fibromas, fibrosar- 
comas, myxosarcomas, leiomyosarcomas, 
giant sarcomas of the pleura, sarcoma-hke 
tumors and endotheliomas. Saccone and 
Coblentzi^ reported 1.1 per thousand 
cases in 45,000 autopsies. Clagett et al 
collected 24 cases of fibrous mesothelio- 
mas over a 20 year period at the Mayo 
Clinic in which surgery had been done. 

Clagett's group of 24 cases, Benoit and 
Ackerman's^^ 17 cases, and Stout and 
Humadi's 1 8 cases revealed a mean age of 
approximately 50 years, with several cases 
occurring as early as age 12 years and as 
late as 70 years. On an average the 
number of females was slightly higher 
than the males. 

Clinically these lesions are first detected 
on casual x-ray examination or fluoro- 
scopic chest examination, all as part of 
routine general examinations. This, inci- 
dentally, has made it difficult to calculate 
the age of the tumor in these asympto- 



24 



Vol. 51. No. 2 



MILLETT— MESOTHELIOMA OF PLEURA 



matic cases unless one has a point of 
reference as in the present reported case 
where a fluoroscopic examination of the 
chest two years prior to the present one 
was entirely negative. However, in some 
reported instances the tumor has been 
tcnown to have existed for as long as 
nine (9) years. ^' 

Local chest symptoms, when present, 
are relatively rare. They are related 
mainly to mechanical interference in the 
chest itself. Thus there has been noted 
a sense of heaviness on the side of the 
lesion. When large enough the tumor 
may produce dyspnea and even a non- 
productive cough. Occasionally blood 
streaked sputum is noted. Chest pain 
may occur when the dome of the fibrous 
tumor may attach itself to or rub on the 
pleura opposite to the point of attach- 
ment creating irritation and fibrous ad- 
hesion. Pleuritic pain may also be due 
to pressure on the ribs with erosion of the 
ribs. Distended neck veins may occur. 
Hawthorne and Probese" reported dys- 
phagia and peripheral edema in a 40 year 
old woman. They attributed this to local 
pressure phenomena since these symptoms 
disappeared when a 1,500 gram fibroma 
of the pleura was removed from her right 
chest. Rarely they may cause cardiac 
failure by mechanical pressure. ^^ 

Physical signs in the chest itself may 
not be present — depending on the size 
of the tumor and also on the size and 
the character of the patient's chest in 
relation to the tumor. When present, an 
area of dullness may be percussed out. 
These signs may be obscured or confused 
by fluid, serous or hematogenous. While 
effusions generally occur with malignan- 
cies, they have occurred with benign meso- 
theliomas."' ^^ 

There was no weight loss noted with 
the benign fibrous mesotheliomas of the 
pleura. Some patients have had present- 
ing complaints of chills and fever which 



have been present for varying lengths of 
time. The origin of these symptoms is 
obscure. It has been postulated in some 
instances that these may be due to areas 
of lung compression and pneumonitis. 
When generalized arthraligias are present, 
which are not uncommon with fibromas 
of the pleura, the fever may very well 
accompany these joint pains and swell- 
ing. While arthralgic symptoms have been 
noted with other pulmonary tumors,-^ 
Clagett found that 16 out of his 24 cases 
had symptoms referrable to joints and 
in many instances these were the com- 
plaints that brought the patient to the 
physician. The articular symptoms had 
been present for more than a year. The 
hands, ankles, wrists, elbows, and knees 
were involved with varying degrees of 
disability. Benoit and Ackerman also 
described these symptoms. 

Clubbing of the fingers and toes was 
also seen in association with articular 
symptoms and also as a sign by itself. 
Where joint pains were present without 
associated clubbing of the fingers, it was 
difficult to distinguish the patient's con- 
dition from rheumatoid arthritis. When 
the associated benign fibrous mesotheli- 
oma of the pleura was removed there was 
a rapid disappearance of the articular and 
arthralgic symptoms followed by a slow 
regression and final disappearance of the 
clubbing in every case. These symptoms 
also seem to be dependent on the size 
of the tumor and were not seen unless 
the tumor weighed in the vicinity of 450 
grams. 

An unusual symptom associated with 
large slow growing tumors in various 
parts of the body, well encapsulated, hav- 
ing the microscopic appearance of fibro- 
mas, mesotheliomas or sarcomas of vari- 
ous types has been severe hypoglycemia. 
These tumors have been grouped as fibro- 
genic or mesodermal tumors associated 
with hypoglycemia and the syndrome of 



April, 1966 



25 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNH'ERSITY OF MARYLAND 



"large non-pancreatic tumors with hypo- 
glycemia" is being recognized as a clinical 
entity. Cases have been reported where 
patients have been admitted in a maniacal 
condition or in states of insulin shock 
with blood sugars as low as 10-12 per cent 
with the finding of these associated 
tumors. Injections of glucose have given 
temporary relief, but cure was only ob- 
tained by extirpation of the tumor. 22 A 
growing literature on this subject is avail- 
able. ^^^ '^*- 2^' 26 The mechanism by which 
these tumors induce hypoglycemia is not 
definitely known. 

Roentgenographically solitary pleural 
mesotheliomas of the pedunculated variety 
may be easy to recognize according to 
Berne and Heitzman.^'' They have stated 
that a pedunculated pleural mass has the 
ability to move about the pleural space 
freely if very little surface of the intra- 
pleural mass is attached to either pleural 
surface. Because of the remarkable mo- 
bility of these tumors a striking change 
in the shape and density of the shadow 
they produce can occur on comparably 
projected and exposed roentgenograms. 
They report 2 cases in which a pre-opera- 
tive diagnosis of a pedunculated tumor 
was made on this basis and proven at 
surgery. Occasionally, the localized tumor 
is huge and opacifies the major portion 
of a hemithorax simulating a massive 
effusion. 16 Occasionally pneumothorax 
may be helpful in delineating a localized 
tumor. 

Other attempts at pre-operative diag- 
nosis of the benign pleural fibroma have 
not been of great help. Cell block studies 
on aspirated chest fluid where present 
have been negative. Bronchoscopy has 
been of little use in these extrapleural 
tumors. Bronchial washes have yielded 
negative cytological studies. Compression 
of the bronchial tree, when present, does 
not necessarily tell us whether the dis- 
tortion of the bronchial tree is due to 



intrapleural or extrapleural pressure. 
Angiocardiography may be of use in 
doubtful cases in attempting to eliminate 
pericardial and great vessel involvement 
and to distinguish these tumors from a 
variety of other intra-thoracic tumors. 

The final diagnosis lies in the hands 
of the surgeon and the pathologist. At 
operation, where an encapsulated, lobu- 
lated tumor is found hanging from a 
pedicle usually from the visceral pleura, 
sometimes from the parietal pleura and 
rarely from an interlobar area, a clinical 
diagnosis of benign fibrous mesothelioma 
of the pleura can be made with relative 
certainty. Treatment is comparatively 
easy in these cases. The pedicle is tied 
ofl" and the tumor is delivered through 
the thoracotomy opening. Grossly these 
tumors vary in size, some being reported 
as weighing as much as 5,000 grams. 
Microscopically the benign pleural fibro- 
mas will be composed of spindle shaped 
cells, areas of collagen tissue, areas of 
necrosis, and tumor cells of mesothelial 
origin which lack mitosis or any evidence 
of malignant change. Prognosis is, there- 
fore, good. 

Summary 

1. Primary neoplasms of the pleura 
are divided into two main groups, one 
of benign solitary localized pedunculated 
growths, and the other a difi'use malig- 
nant type involving the entire pleura and 
associated with metastasis. The mixed 
encapsulated type of tumor usually acts 
as a benign fibroma. 

2. Many of the cases of benign fibrous 
mesotheliomas of the pleura are asympto- 
matic and are picked up on routine chest 
x-rays or fluoroscopy. 

3. A definitive pre-operative diagnosis 
of benign fibroma of the pleura may be 
difficult to make, but where an intra- 
thoracic tumor is present associated with 
a history of chills, fever, migratory swell- 



26 



Vol. 51. Nc. 



MILLETT— MESOTHELIOMA OF PLEURA 



ing and pain in the joints, and clubbing 
of the fingers, the clinician should be 
aware of and consider the possibility of 
localized fibrous mesothelioma. 

4. X-rays of the chest taken with the 
patient changing his position may help 
diagnose a shifting pedunculated tumor. 

5. The association of hypoglycemia 
and fibrogcnic mesotheliomas in the chest, 
or elsewhere in the body, is stressed as 
a finding worthy of the clinician's interest. 

501 Fulton Avenue, 
Hampstead, New York 

Bibliography 

1. Klemperer. p. and Rabin, C. B. Pri- 
mary Neoplasms of the Pleura. A Report of 
Five Cases. Arch Piilh 11:22,5, 1931. 

2. Stout. A. P. and Murray, M. R. Local- 
ized Pleural Mesothelioma. Arch Path 34:9S\, 
1942. 

3. Stout. A. P. and Humadi. G. M. Solitary 
(Localized) Mesothelioma of the Pleura. Ann 
Surg 133:50. 1951. 

4. Clagett. O. T., McDonald, J. R, and 
Schmidt. H. W. Localized Fibrous Mesotheli- 
oma of the Pleura. J Thorac Cardiov Surg 
24:2n, 1952. 

5. Foster, E. A. and Ackerman, L. V. 
Localized Mesotheliomas of the Pleura. Amer 
J Clin Path 34:349. 1960. 

6. Rubin, E. H. Thoracic Diseases. W. B. 
Saunders Co., p. 542, 1961. 

7. Harrison, T. R. Principles of Internal 
Medicine. Blakiston Div. McGraw Hill, p. 
1400, 1958. 

8. Cecil. R. L. and Loeb, R. F. Textbook 
of Medicine. W. B. Saunders Co., p. 1005, 
1959. 

9. Ackerman, L. V. and Regato, J. A. 
Cancer, C. V. Mosby, p. 447, 1954. 

10. Roberts, H. J. Difficult Diagnosis. W. B. 
Saunders Co., 1959. 

11. Foster, E. A. and Ackerman, L. V. 
Localized Mesotheliomas of the Pleura. Amer 
J Clin Path 34:349, I960. 

12. Stout, A. P. Solitary Fibrous Meso- 
thelioma of the Peritoneum. Cancer i.-820, 
1950. 

13. Evans, N. Mesothelioma of the Epidi- 



dymus and Tuncia Vaginalis. J Urol 50:249, 
1943. 

14. Masson. p., Riopelle, J. L. and 
Simard, L. G. Le Mesothelioma Benin de 
la Sphere Genitale. Rev Cancid Biol 1:120, 
1942. 

15. Saccone, a. and Coblentz, A. Endo- 
thelioma of the Pleura with Report of Two 
Cases. Amer J Clin Path 13:186, 1943. 

16. Benoit, Jr., W. H. and Ackerman, 
L. V. Solitary Pleural Mesotheliomas. / 
Thonic Cardiov Surg 25:346, 1953. 

17. H\wthorne, H. R. and Frobese, A. S. 
Benign Fibroma of the Pleura. Dis Chest 
17:588. 1950. 

18. Sarot, I. A. Fibrosarcoma of the 
Pleura Mechanically Causing Congestive Heart 
Failure: Successful Surgical Removal. Quart 
Bull Sea View Hosp 70.109, (July) 1948. 

19. Ehrenhaft, J. L., Sensenig, M. and 
Lawrence, M. S. Mesothelioma of the Pleura. 
J Thorac Cardiov Surg 40:393, 1960. 

20. Heaney, J. P., Overton, R. C. and 
DeBakey. M. E. Benign Localized Pleuro 
Mesothelioma. / Thorac Cardiov Surg 34:553, 
1957. 

21. WiERMAN, W. H., Clagett, O. T and 
McDonald, J. R. Articular Manifestations of 
Pulmonary Diseases; An Analysis of Their 
Occurrence in 1024 Cases in which Pulmonary 
Resection was Performed. JAMA 755.1459, 
1954. 

22. Miller, D. R. at al. Hypoglycemia 
due to Non-pancreatic Mesodermal Tumors. 
Ann Surg 150:684, 1959. 

23. Nesbitt, K. a., Boswell, J. T. et al. 
Malignant Mesothelioma Associated with Hypo- 
glycemia. Amer J Clin Path i0.148, 1958. 

24. Friesan, S. R. and Miller, D. R. Fibro- 
genic Mesodermal Tumors. An Unusual Case 
of Hyperinsulinism. Amer J Surg 99:420, I960. 

25. Nevins, D. B. and Friedman, N. B. 
Mesotheliomas and Extra-Ovarian Thecomas 
with Hypoglycemic and Nephrotic Syndromes. 
Cancer 72.1263, 1959. 

26. SCHOLZ, D. A., WooLNER, L. B. and 
Priestly, J. T. Spontaneous Hypoglycemia 
Associated with Fibrogenic Tumor, Report of 
Two Cases. Ann Intern Med 46:196, 1957. 

27. Berne, S. A. and Heintzman, R. E. 
The Roentgenologic Signs of Pedunculated 
Pleural Tumors. Amer J Roentgen 87:892, 
1962. 



April, 1966 



27 



Chromosomal Mosaicism in Gonadal Dysgenesis 

Report of a Case 



HANS-DIETER TAUBERT, M.D., ERICA F. MOSZKOWSKI, M.D.* 



THE ENTITY of primary amenorrhea, 
short stature, webbing of the neck, and 
cubitus valgus, has become known as 
Turner's syndrome. It is often associated 
with multiple congenital anomalies, par- 
ticularly those of the cardiovascular 
system. The gamut of this syndrome may 
range from the classical Turner's syn- 
drome with severe defects to the so-called 
pure gonadal dysgenesis, ^^ where the 
pathology is Hmited to the gonads. The 
common pathognomonic denominator is 
the absence of germ cells. The ovaries 
consist merely of streaks of stromal tissue 
with no ova being present. Ford^ recog- 
nized in 1959 that this syndrome is 
characterized by the absence of one X 
chromosome, except for rare cases.^^ Of 
particular theoretical and practical interest 
are those cases where 2 stem-Hnes of cells 
are present. One contains the normal 
modal number of chromosomes, while 
the other is hypoploid due to the lack of 
one X chromosome. Chromosomal 
mosaicism with XO/XX configuration of 
the sex chromosomes is next to XO the 
most common finding in gonadal dysgene- 
sis. Miller was recently able to review 
over 25 reported cases. i- 3. 7, s, lo, n. 12, 
17. 18 jt J5 tjjg purpose of this paper to 
report and discuss another case of gonadal 
dysgenesis with chromosomal mosaicism. 

Case Report 

C. J., U. H. #29-17-32. This 15-year-old 
Negro girl was first seen in the Gynecologic 
Endocrine Clinic on June 30, 1964. Her chief 



complaint was stunted growth, primary am- 
enorrhea, and minimal development of the 
secondary sex characteristics. Her height was 
142.5 cm. She weighed 107 lbs.; the span was 
150 cm. On general inspection the patient had 
a short neck with a trace of webbing. The 
chest was shield-like and the nipples wide- 
spaced, small and flat. There was no areolar 
pigmentation. Axillary and pubic hair was 
sparse (Table 1, Fig. 1). Her hands were 
remarkably long, with spidery fingers, and 
hyperextensible joints. The palms were spoon- 
shaped and could not be completely flattened. 
The fourth toe on the right foot was short. 

Table 1 — Malformations and Laboratory Data 



A. EXTERNAL MALFORMATIONS 




Webbing of the neck 




trace 


Low implantation of the hair 


present 


Short fourth metatars 


al bone 


present 


Epicanthic folds 




present 


Cubitus valgus 




present 


Arachnodactyly 




present 


Spoon-shaped palms 




present 


Shield-like chest with 


wide 




spaced nipples 




present 


Pigmented naevi 




absent 



B. RADIOLOGIC MALFORMATIONS 

Sella turcica normal 

Bone age normal 

Osteoporosis absent 



C. FAMILY 

Number in sibship 
Age of mother at birth 
Age of father at birth 
Malformations in family 
Consanguinity in family 
X-ray. viral disease, etc. around 
conception 



D. LABORATORY DATA 
Vaginal cytology 
Sex-chromatin, rt. buccal ca' 
Sex-chromatin, It. buccal ca^ 
"Drumsticks" 

infignratif 
number 



* From the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. 



Total urinary gonadotrophir 

17-ketosteroid excretion 

Protein-bound iodine 

Xga Proposita 

Mother 
Sister 

Dermatoglyphics 



absent 
absent 



no estrogen effect 
247c positive 
18% positive 
53/1000 
XO/XX 
44-0 

45-34 (51.47c) 
46-32 <48.67r) 
47-0 

more than 50 
mu/24 hrs. 
2 mg./24 hrs. 
7.7 mcg7o 
Xga (4-) 
Xgra <+) 
Xga (+) 
compatible 



28 



Vol. 51, No. : 



TAUBERT, MOSZKOWSKI— CHROMOSOMAL MOSAICISM 




Fie. 1 



tion of the vaginal mucosa. Adnexal structures 
could not be palpated. 

Laboratory Data: On August 5, 1964, 26% 
of the buccal mucosal cells were positive for 
se.x-chromatin. On March 2, 1965, a repeat 
examination of both the right and left buccal 
mucosa showed 24% chromatin-positive cells 
on the right including 6% very small ones. 
The smear on the left revealed the presence 
of Barr bodies in 18% of the cells with 4% 
being small ones. Fifty-three polymorpho- 
nuclear leukocytes per 1,000 were found to be 
positive for the presence of "drum sticks." 

Vaginal cytology from June 30, 1964, did not 
show any evidence of estrogenic stimulation. 

Chromosomal Analysis: White blood cells 
were cultured by a modification of the method 
of Moorhead.i-' Si.xty-six cells were suitable 
for analysis. Thirty-two showed the normal 
modal number of 46 chromosomes. The re- 
maining 34 cells lacked one of the large sub- 
metacentric chromosomes of group 6-12 
(Denver Classification)^ or C (Patau). is This 
was interpreted as mosaicism of the X-chromo- 
somes with the following two stem-lines: 
45 (XO)/46 (XX). 

Gonadotrophin excretion: The 24-hour value 
for total urinary gonadotrophins exceeded 50 
mouse-units (more than adult normal). 

The 17-ketosteroids were 2 mg./24 hour 
urine. 

X-ray studies: The sella turcica was normal. 
The bone age was compatible with 14.5 years. 
Osteoporosis was not evident. 

Dermatolglyphics:'^^ The axial triradius was 
in t' position. The adt-angle exceeded 50°. 
All digits with the exception of digits V sinister 
showed ulnar loops. The latter had a whirl. 
The total digital ridge count was 144; the 
ridge count was 144; the ridge count between 
triradius a and b was 58. For comparison the 
same data were obtained from her younger 
sister: Axial triradius t, adt-angle 45°, digital 
ridge count 132 (normal range); a-b ridge 
count 45 (normal); whirls on digitus I and 11 
right and left, and digitus III on the right. 
The remaining finger had ulnar loops. 



No cardiac anomalies were found. The 
patient had poor vision in one eye due to 
strabismus. Color vision was normal. 

Examination with the patient under anes- 
thesia disclosed a small cervix, atrophic labia, 
and an intact hymen. There was no stimula- 



Comment 

Lack of germ cells in the gonads and 
loss of one X-chromosome in early de- 
velopment are the notable features of this 
entity. It appears that segregation and 



April, 1966 



29 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



migration of the primitive germ cells from 
the hind-gut to the germinal ridge depends 
upon the presence of 2 X-chromosomes.'' 
Embryonal cells do not show many 
chromocenters prior to day 16-18 of de- 
velopment. After segregation of the primi- 
tive germ cells, however, one of them be- 
comes genetically inactive and as such 
the chromocenter or the Barr body.^ Fail- 
ure of the primitive germ cells to arrive at 
the germinal ridge seems to arrest the 
gonad at the stage of the primitive, in- 
different medullar Any other cause 
which will prevent this migration will have 
the same result in gonadal development. 
This explains chromatin-positive cases of 
gonadal dysgenesis with normal 46/XX 
karyotype. 

In a case as ours one has to assume that 
the germ cells descended from a stem-line 
with the karyotype 45/XO. Examination 
of more than one tissue could possibly 
have uncovered an even more complex 
system of multiple mosaicism. Differences 
in the percentages of chromatin-positive 
cells from either buccal mucosa have been 
observed.* 

The observed difference of 18% and 
24% respectively cannot be considered 
significant in this context. 

Pre-zygotic maternal or paternal non- 
disjunction during the first or second 
meiotic division is thought to be the cause 
for aneuploid states such as gonadal dys- 
genesis, Klinefelter's syndrome, autosomal 
trisomies, et cetera. In contrast, chro- 
mosomal mosaics are believed to origi- 
nate from faulty division of the zy- 
gote.^ * ^ Mitotic non-disjunction or loss 
of an X-chromosome due to anaphase lag 
have been postulated as possible mecha- 
nisms. 

The maternal or paternal origin of the 
X-chromosome in such individual can be 
studied by investigating sex linked traits. 
Color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate- 



dehydrogenase deficiency, and Duchenne's 
atrophy were not applicable in the case 
presented. Determination of the Xg blood 
group can be most helpful in this aspect, 
since presence of the Xg" (-f) allele 
assures dominance of the trait. ^^^ Since 
all accessible members of the family were 
Xg" ( + ), no further information could 
be gained in this aspect. 

Mitotic non-disjunction at the first 
cleavage division would have resulted in 
an X/XXX embryo. The triple-X stem- 
line would be recognizable by virtue of 
the supernumerary chromosome. A num- 
ber of buccal smear cells would contain 
2 Barr bodies, representing 2 inacti- 
vated X-chromosomes. The most likely 
explanation is that an XX zygote lost 
one of the sex chromosomes during ana- 
phase at the first cleavage division, re- 
sulting in equal proportions of XO/XX 
cells as observed. This cell type could 
also have originated in mitotic non-dis- 
junction at the second cleavage division. 
However, one would have to assume that 
the zygote was originally XO, and the 
proportion between the 2 cell fines should 
not be even. 

Dermatoglyphic examinations have 
been used successfully in characterizing 
various congenital anomalies. The con- 
figuration of the dermal ridges are laid 
down at a very early stage of develop- 
ment, around the third month. i* The 
propositus showed some of the typical 
findings: t' position of the axial triradius, 
increased adt-angle, and an increased 
dermal ridge count. 

Treatment 

The patient was placed on estrogen- 
substitution therapy with the aim to in- 
duce development of the secondary sex 
characteristics, and hopefully to induce 
further growth. Figure 2 attests to 
the effectiveness of this regimen as to the 



30 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



TAUBERT. MOSZKOWSKI— CHROMOSOMAL MOSAICISM 




former, e.g., after 6 months of 0.2 mg. of 
stilbestrol, q.d. No further growth oc- 
curred. Cyclic therapy will be instituted 
for induction of menstrual cycles as soon 



as the development of the genitalia is 
suflScient. 

Summary 

A 15-year-old-Negro girl presented 
with stunted growth, primary amenorrhea, 
and lacking development of the secondary 
sex characteristics. Chromosomal analy- 
sis confirmed the clinical impression of 
gonadal dysgenesis. The karyotype pre- 
sented as a mosaic containing two cell 
lines: 45 (XO)/46 (XX). Estrogenic 
replacement therapy resulted in satis- 
factory development of the secondary sex 
characteristics. The origin of the chromo- 
somal defect was discussed. 

Acknowledgment 

The help of Miss E. Jahn of the Baltimore 
Rh-Typing Laboratory in obtaining the Xg- 
Typing is gratefully acknowledged. 

References 

1. De La Chapelle, A: Cytogenetical and 
Clinical Observations in Female Gonadal Dys- 
genesis, Acta Endocr., 65:1, 1962 (Suppl.). 

2. Editorial: A Proposed Standard Nomen- 
clature of Human Mitotic Chromosomes, Amer. 
J. Human Genet., i2.-384. 

3. Ford, C. E., Jones, K. W., Polani, P. E., 
De Almeida, J. C, and Bricgs, J. H.: A Sex 
Chromosome Anomaly in a Case of Gonadal 
Dysgenesis, Lancet, 7. 7 11, 1959. 

4. FROLA^ro, A., Johnsen, S. G., Andersen, 
P., Dein, E., Sanger, and Race, R. R.: Non- 
disjunction and XXY Men, Lancet, 2.'1121-22, 
1963. 

5. Griboff, S. O. and Lawrence, R: The 
Chromosomal Etiology of Congenital Gonadal 
Defects, Amer. J. Med., iO.-544-563, 1961. 

6. Grumbach, M. M. and Morishima, A.: 
Sex Chromatin and the Sex Chromosomes: 
On the Origin of Sex Chromatin from a Single 
X Chromosome, Acta CytoL, 6;46-60, Jan. -Feb. 
1962. 

7. Jones, H. W., Ferguson-Smith, M. A., 
and Heller, R. H.: The Pathology and Cyto- 
genetics of Gonadal Agenesis, Amer. J. Obstet. 
Gynec, 87:57S, 1963. 

8. LiNDSTEN, J.: The Nature and Origin of 



A^ril, 1966 



31 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



X Chromosome Aberrations in Turner's Syn- 
drome, Almquist and Wiksell, Stockholm, 1963. 

9. LiNDSTEN, J., et ah: Source of the X 
in XO Females: The Evidence of X7, Lancet, 
7;558-559, 1963. 

10. Mellinger, M.: Turner's Syndrome 
with XO/XX Mosaicism, Henry Ford Hasp. 
Med. Bull., i2.181-186, 1964. 

11. MiKKELSEN, M., Froland, A., and 
Ellebjerg, J.: XO/XX Mosaicism in a Pair 
of Presumably Monozygotic Twins with Dif- 
ferent Phenotypes, Cytogenetics, 2:86-98, 1963. 

12. Miller, O. J.: The Sex Chromosome 
Anomalies, Amer. J. Obstet. Gynec, 90.1078, 
1964. 

13. MOORHEAD, P. S., NOWELL, P. C, MeLL- 

MAN, N. J., Battipps, D. M., and Hunger- 
ford, D. A.: Chromosome Preparations of 
Leukocytes Cultured from Human Peripheral 
Blood, Exp. Cell. Res., 20;613, 1960. 



14. Moszkowski, E. F., De Luca, L., and 
Taubert, H. D.: Pure Gonadal Dysgenesis, 
Obstet. & Gynec, 25.329, 1965. 

15. Patau, K.: Chromosome Identification 
and the Denver Report, Lancet, J. -93 3, 1961. 

16. Penrose, L. S.: Fingerprints, Palms and 
Chromosomes, Nature, 197:933, 1963. 

17. Vaharu, T., Voorhess, M. L., Leibow, 
L. G., Cara, J., Patton, R. G., and Gardner, 
L. I.: XX/XO Mosaicism in a Girl, /. Pediat., 
67,-750-754, 1962. 

18. Van Wijk, J. A. M., Blankenborg, 
G. J., and Stolte, L. A. M.: XO/XX Mosaic- 
ism and Mongolism in the Same Person, Lancet, 
7.171, 1964. 

19. Warren, J. C, Erkman, B., Cheatum, 
S., and Holman, G.: Hilus Cell Adenoma in a 
Dysgenetic Gonad with XX/XO Mosaicism, 
Lancet, i.141-143, 1963. 



32 



Vol. 51, No. 2 




poofe EctJtctosi 




A University Is Born, By Margaret Byrnside, 
M.D. Union. West Virginia, 1965. 

■'Let us not lightly cast aside things that 
belong to the past, for only with the past can 
we weave the fabric of the future." Thus 
wrote Anatole France, and we present his 
statement in defense of the value of his- 
torical considerations in these utilitarian 
times. 

The author's obstetrical background un- 
doubtedly influenced her selection of the 
title. She characterizes her work as a short 
genealogical sketch of the University of 
Maryland and not a definitive history; and 
states her threefold purpose as follows: 

"First — to show how the small unit of the 
Medical College of Maryland, through 
mergers and affiliations, finally, after more 
than 100 years grew into a true University. 

"Second — to bring the early fathers of 
the institution into present day perspective, 
to learn to know them, and to acclaim their 
work. 

"Third — to stimulate interest among the 
present Faculties and Students of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in their heritage." 

The first seven chapters depict the 
"embryology" of the future university. The 
engaging and detailed story continues to 
evolve in the final eleven chapters, each 
covering a decade through 1920; while the 
epilogue brings the reader down to date with 
a brief outline of significant events. Nine 
appendices present facsimilies of the im- 
portant legal acts which were basic in the 
evolution of the university; and also de- 
scriptions of the various institutions which 
were combined to form the University of 
Maryland. There are 215 text pages, and the 
appendices occupy 80 pages. There is an 
adequate combined index of subjects and 



personal names. There are 31 unnumbered 
pages of illustrations placed together near 
the middle of the text. The binding is 
attractive and the text type is clear. 

The author's informal style facilitates easy 
reading so that the reader becomes absorbed 
in the narrative. For her fresh viewpoint, 
and for the literary progeny born of the 
painstaking travail of extensive personal 
research, this reader is deeply grateful to the 
author; and it is his belief that she, a most 
loyal alumna of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine, has performed a real 
service for her Alma Mater and for the 
entire university. She has accomplished 
her "triplet" purpose admirably. The book 
is warmly recommended to all interested 
in the University of Maryland. 

John E. Savage, M.D. 

Obstetrics. 13th Edition by J. P. Greenhill. 
1245 pp. Illus. 'W. B. Saunders, Phila- 
delphia. 1965. $22.00 

The Thirteenth Edition of Obstetrics by 
J. P. Greenhill, published by the Saunders 
Company, is a comprehensive volume of 
1245 pages. Included therein are 1296 il- 
lustrations, 54 of which are in color. This 
aspect of the book has to be classified as 
magnificent, and is indeed one of the high- 
lights. 

Dr. Greenhill wisely selected 32 out- 
standing world authorities to help prepare 
special chapters of this edition. These men 
have contributed excellent material in order 
to modernize current trends and thoughts 
in the specialty. 

Noteworthy are the dynamic chapters on 
erythroblastosis fetalis, pathology of labor, 
human cytogenetics, fetal electrocardi- 
ography, and obstetrical anesthesia. 



April, 1966 



33 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Two aspects of the book which do not 
keep up with its general excellence are those 
which pertain to the antibiotics and the 
modern era of obstetrics and the teratogens 
as they are known today. 

As in the past, the bibliography is ex- 
cellent, giving the reader easy access to 
subject material. The language used 
throughout the book is clear, concise, and 
to the point. 

In summary, it can be stated that this is 
an all-inclusive book that encompasses the 
spirit of the great Joseph B. DeLee, who 
wrote the original edition. It is definitely 
recommended for medical students. 

Norman Levin 



Diseases of the Newborn. 2nd Ed. By Alex- 
ander J. Schaffer, M.D. and Milton 
Markowitz, M.D. 1023 pp. Ulus. W. B. 
Saunders Co., Philadelphia. 1965. 
$20.00. 

This second edition of Dr. Alexander J. 
Schaffer's Diseases of the Newborn is 
devoted to man's first 30 days of extra 
uterine life. The book includes a section 
on neonatal cardiology by Dr. Milton 
Markowitz and a chapter on fluid and 
electrolytes by Dr. Lawrence Finberg. 

It is an excellent reference by a prac- 
titioner for use by those interested in pedi- 
atrics and general family medicine. It 
is of particular value for pediatric interns 
and residents as a basic source of infor- 
mation and should prove to be an essential 
part of their library. 

The direct, flowing style is easy to read 



and yet presents a massive amount of 
material in a comparatively small space. 
Topics are sub-titled in bold print as to 
physical and laboratory findings, diagnostic 
criteria, etiology, treatment, and prognosis. 
Example cases are used generously and the 
illustrations are better than average. In- 
dexing is complete ,and can be used accur- 
ately and quickly. Printing and binding 
are the best. 

The section dealing with cardiology is 
outstanding in its content and practical usage 
in diagnosis and treatment. Other chapters 
of particular note include those on gastro- 
intestinal and urinary tract disorders. The 
appendices are unusual and valuable in 
their presentation in outline form of proto- 
cols for nursery care of both full term and 
low birth weight infants; newborn drugs 
and doses, resuscitation of the newborn, 
and for management of the newborns with 
suspected erythoblastosis. 

Fluid balance by Dr. Finberg was un- 
fortunately short and as a result was gen- 
eralized. Future editions will no doubt find 
this section expanded and will include more 
information on the neonatal surgical patient 
and his special problems. 

Another topic to be anticipated is the 
management of the caloric needs of the 
newborn, be they normal or low birth 
weight, stressed or stable. 

In summary, this monograph is worth 
the purchase price and will become more 
valuable daily to those who buy it. 

Donald E. Knickerbocker, M.D. 
Chief Resident, In-Patient and 
Nursery Service, University Hospital 



34 



Vol. 51, No. 2 




MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



Dear Members of the Medical Alumni and Friends: 

It is sometimes helpful and necessary to state in an oversimplified 
form the facts as they pertain to medical education. We believe 
they are as follows: 

1. The four years of education in the medical school are primarily 
focused on the student acquiring factual information and habits 
of study. 

2. The apphcation of the fund of knowledge in the basic medical 
sciences to the patient and the recognition of normal and 
abnormal findings in the patient and their management. 

3. The reaUzation that achievement that justifies an M.D. degree 
is only the base for the building of professional excellence. 

4. That judgment and skill must be obtained through continuing 
education, practice, and experience. 

5. The choice of a field of medical practice is the right and re- 
sponsibility of the individual involved. 

6. The preparation for the field of practice takes place during the 
internship and residency programs after the M.D. degree has 
been awarded. 

7. The medical school's responsibility in the individual's choice 
of a field of medical practice is limited to acquainting the 
individual with the opportimities available and making avail- 
able advice if the student requests it. 



Sincerely, 



William S. Stone, M.D. 
Dean 



April, 1966 



©r. 

TiZichard R 

TUayer 




J-lppointed to fleurology Faculty 



Dr. William S. Stone, Dean of the 
School of Medicine, and Dr. Erland Nelson, 
professor and head, department of neu- 
rology, announce the appointment of Dr. 
Richard F. Mayer as associate professor 
of neurology effective November 1, 1965. 
Dr. Mayer received his doctorate at the 
University of Buffalo School of Medicine 
in 1954. After medical internship at the 
Boston City Hospital, he received his train- 
ing in neurology at the Mayo Foundation, 
Rochester, Minnesota, and the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital, Boston. From 
1957 to 1958 he was assistant in research at 
The National Hospital, Queen Square, 
London, and during 1960-61, research and 
teaching fellow in neurology at the Harvard 
Neurological Unit, Boston City Hospital. 

Dr. Mayer served with the Navy as neu- 
rologist at the U. S. Naval Hospital, Chelsea, 
Massachusetts in 1959-1960. He has been 
a member of the faculty of the Harvard 



Medical School from 1961 until the present 
and has served as associate visiting physician 
for neurology at the Boston City Hospital. 
In addition, he has acted as director of the 
Electroencephalographic Laboratory, Boston 
City Hospital since 1964. 

Dr. Mayer is well known for his signifi- 
cant contributions in the areas of peripheral 
nerve and muscle physiology and will con- 
tinue an active program of clinical and ex- 
perimental research in these areas while at 
the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Mayer has been a diplomate of the 
American Board of Psychiatry and Neu- 
rology since 1961 and is a fellow of the 
American Academy of Neurology. His ap- 
pointment brings to 7 the number of full- 
time neurologists at the University of Mary- 
land, making this newest department of the 
School of Medicine one of the largest and 
most versatile neurological groups in the 
area. 



Vol. 51, No. i 



faculty 



NOTES 



Professor Figge Architect of 
Unique Cadaver Law 

Donation of bodies to the Anatomy Board 
of Maryland is currently a well functioning 
program according to Dr. Frank H. J. 
Figge, chairman of the Anatomical Board 
and professor of anatomy at the School of 
Medicine. Some 800 or more individuals in 
the State of Maryland have taken the neces- 
sary steps according to a recently enacted 
Maryland law which would make their bodies 
available after death to one of the two 
Medical Schools in the State of Maryland. 

Under a Maryland law passed in 1960, 
an individual by executing a donation form 
can direct that his body be turned over 
to the Anatomy Board. Donated bodies are 
then given free transportation from the place 
of death provided it is within the State. 
Free embalming and free cremation are pro- 
vided. Donors are supplied with a wallet 
card giving directions for notifying the 
Anatomy Board in the event of death. 

Dr. Figge explained that at least 6,000 
donations would be necessary in Maryland 
in order to supply the two Medical Schools 
with enough bodies for minimum dissection 
requirements. In the past few years the total 
number of unclaimed cadavers has declined 
and Dr. Figge has indicated the necessity 
for such remedial legislation in order to 
insure the supply of dissection material for 
oncoming classes of medical students. 

Department of Medicine 

Dr. Edmund G. Beacham, assistant pro- 
fessor of medicine and chief of the tubercu- 
losis division of the Baltimore City Hospitals, 
was recently the recipient of the Governor's 
award for promotion of the employment of 
the handicapped. In addition to the State 
award, Dr. Beacham received a citation for 
meritorious service from the President's 
committee on employment of the handi- 
capped. 



After receiving his medical training and 
serving as a military surgeon, Dr. Beacham 
became assistant chief and later chief of the 
Tuberculosis Division of the Baltimore City 
Hospitals. Since that time, he has served on 
the staffs of both the Johns Hopkins and 
the University of Maryland Schools of Medi- 



Department of Pathology 

Dr. Harlan I. Firminger, professor of 
pathology and chairman of the department 
of pathology at the School of Medicine, has 
assumed the editorial responsibility for the 
publication of the Fascid-es of the Atlas of 
Tumor Pathology. Dr. Firminger serves 
as editor for the Universities Associated for 
Research and Education in Pathology. 

Pathologists Present Important 

Paper at Society for Experimental 

Biology 

Dr. Harlan I. Firminger, professor and 
head of the Department of Pathology, and 
Dr. Walter F. Oster, a recent chief resident 
in the department, presented a paper en- 
titled "Chloramphenicol Inhibition of Hepa- 
tic Carcinogenesis in the Rat," on the oc- 
casion of the annual meeting of the society 
on April 14, 1966 at Atlantic City. 

Doctors Firminger and Oster revealed that 
chloramphenicol apparently by blocking pro- 
tein synthesis was able to prevent induced 
cancer in the liver of rats otherwise highly 
susceptible in the absence of the chloram- 
phenicol treatment. 

Julius Friedenwald 
Memorial Lecture 

Dr. Nicholas C. Hightower, who is direc- 
tor of clinical research at Scott and White 
Clinic, Temple, Texas, spoke on "Esophageal 
Functions in Health and Disease" on the oc- 
casion of the annual lecture held Tuesday, 
April 5th in Gordon Wilson Hall, University 
Hospital. The lectureship was established in 
1942 in honor of the late Dr. Julius Frieden- 
wald, long a member of the medical school 
faculty. 



April, 1966 



The Medical School Applicant Admission 
Policies — A Faculty Problem 



DIETRICH C. SMITH, Ph.D. 



All medical schools are acutely aware 
of the responsibilities they bear in selecting 
those students who as physicians will be a 
credit to their chosen profession and who 
will be able to meet the increasing emotional 
and intellectual demands of the medical 
curriculum. In addition they are constantly 
reminded of the increasing need for more 
and better doctors. In Maryland for instance 
it is estimated that by 1975 at least 240 new 
physicians should be graduated that year 
by the local medical schools to meet the 
growing needs of the state for adequate 
medical care. To understand what this 
means it should be noted that in 1965 these 
two schools graduated about 160 students, 
80 short of the projected 10 year goal. 

For the past 10 years the author has 
served as chairman of the Committee on 
Admissions of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. During this time the 
committee reviewed over 5,000 applications 
from which they selected 500 students. 
Inevitably this process could not go on with- 
out certain guidelines and it is the purpose 
of this article to try and explain by what 
route the committee came to its decisions 
during his period. It should be emphasized 
at the beginning that the answers will not 
always be clear cut, that there is no rigid 
system, no computer-like techniques by 
which its will was manifested. It should 
also be stressed that what is said here ap- 
plies to procedures used in the past and is 
in no way intended to outline the official 
policy, if such exists, in the future. The 
author has no authority to set such a 
policy, let alone define it. Time and circum- 
stances change and selection procedures 



* Professor of Physiology, Emeritus and 
formerly Chairman, Committee on Admissions. 



undergo the inevitable processes of evo- 
lution. 

First of all it must be clearly borne in 
mind that no matter how estimable a young 
man may be, no matter what his family 
background or his dedication to a life 
of service devoted to the benefit of his 
fellow man, if he cannot pass the first two 
years of the medical curriculum he will 
never practice medicine. If a student falls 
by the wayside the committee inevitably 
feels that it has failed and in failing has 
denied someone who is possibly a better 
qualified person a place in the school. 

The problem facing any admission com- 
mittee is how to maintain good relations 
with the general public and with the alumni 
and to select from among the several hun- 
dred applicants it must deal with each year 
those who will best meet the needs of the 
community for medical care and to satisfy 
the faculty as to their competency to become 
physicians. No doubt their ultimate de- 
cisions seem capricious to many, especially 
those who have been denied admission or 
to a faculty member who feels that some 
of those in his charge are not up to mastering 
the material in his subject. The latter 
frequently complain that the standards are 
too low while disappointed alumni who 
have sponsored their own children or the 
children of their friends feel the commit- 
tee has set up standards which are im- 
possibly high and as a consequence deny 
a place in the profession to many a meri- 
torious, worthy and estimable young man. 

It is therefore hoped that a discussion of 
past admission procedures may shed some 
light and understanding on how the process 
of selection occurs. The decision to reject or 
accept a student is based largely on his aca- 
demic record, his Medical College Ad- 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



mission test scores, his letters of recom- 
mendation and the impression he makes on 
interview. Each one of these criteria will 
be discussed in some detail. 

Academic Record. By this is meant the 
record which the applicant has made during 
the time spent in college, usually, a period 
of four years but on occasion three and 
rarely less. This record is the single most 
important consideration which enters into 
the final verdict. It is expressed quantitively 
as the grade point average or more simply as 
the GPA. At the Medical School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland during the period, 1955 
to 1965, this was based on a scale of four, 
where A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1 and 
a condition or a failure = 0. The GPA 
is calculated from the transcript or tran- 
scripts which the applicant submits when 
he applies. Since there are sometimes slight 
differences between schools as to how they 
calculate the GPA there may be a dis- 
crepancy between the final average arrived 
at by the applicant and by the medical 
school. These differences however are minor 
and need not concern us here. In making 
these calculations the number of grade 
points for each course are multiplied by the 
number of semester hours or credits for 
each course and the total divided by the 
total number of credits or semester hours 
accumulated by the applicant to date. Thus 
a student who has obtained 90 credits and 
280 grade points has a GPA of 3.11. 

Potential applicants of course want to 
know just what the committee expected in 
the way of grade points. It was not easy 
to answer this question as there is no 
sharply defined cut-off point. The mean 
GPA for the class entering the Medical 
School of the University of Maryland in 
September 1965 (Class of 1969) was 2.83 
for residents and 2.93 for non-residents. 
This figure will probably serve as good a 
bench mark as any for what was expected 
although of course it is obvious that if 
the mean is approximately 3.0 there must 
be a substantial number of accepted students 
below this mean as well as a considerable 
number above. A comparison between 
science and non-science grades can also 



be helpful. The applicant may have an 
overall GPA of 2.8 but his science GPA 
is considerably below this figure. If so he 
is a poor risk for medical school since if 
he is not capable of good work in under- 
graduate courses in science it is extremely 
doubtful if he can pass the science courses 
of the medical curriculum where the stand- 
ards are usually higher and the grading 
more rigid. This is not necessarily true 
of all colleges and no doubt this statement 
will be disputed vigorously by some under- 
graduate instructors. 

Was his performance a consistent one? 
Was his GPA approximately the same for 
each of the three (or four) years of college 
or did he start poorly and show progressive 
and steady improvement? If so the overall 
average might be a bit lower than the 
committee would like but the applicant 
has demonstrated his ability to do high 
level work once he has set his mind to it. 
Conversly did he start off well but gradually 
slipped as he went on? If so, why? Was 
it because he spent more and more time 
in extra-curricular or social activities, be- 
cause he had to take on outside work 
to stay in school or because he was beset 
that year with personal problems of an 
emotional nature? Certainly the commit- 
tee is better able to intei^jret the GPA 
if it has knowledge of these circumstances. 

The committee was also interested in the 
undergraduate college attended. Some col- 
leges are more selective than others in ad- 
mitting students and so can maintain higher 
standards of excellence. Experience over a 
period of years gives some idea of where 
a college stands in this respect. However 
times change and academic standards are 
on the rise everywhere. It is risky to as- 
sume in this period of flux that what was 
true of an institution 10 years ago is still 
true today and therefore a certain measure 
of restraint and caution should enter into 
such judgments. Experience has shown that 
it is not possible to set up a precise or 
quantitative system of evaluation. 

When all the ponderables as well as the 
imponderables are taken into consideration 
the GPA is still considered the best pre- 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



dictor for performance in medical school. 
It is perhaps unfortunate in one way that 
this is so as it serves to place a great deal 
of emphasis on grades and focuses the 
student's attention primarily on this aspect 
of his studies rather than on a mastery of 
the course contents themselves. Admittedly 
there should be no conflict between these 
two objectives but unfortunately students 
oftentimes think there is in spite of he 
protestations of faculty members to the con- 
trary. 

Medical College Admission Test. Virtu- 
ally every applicant to any medical school 
in the United States will take this test, 
familiarly known as the MCAT or more 
simply as the M-cat. It is given by a national 
testing agency each fall and spring to those 
students who expect to apply to some 
medical school within the next few months. 
Most medical schools prefer to have appli- 
cants take the test during the spring of 
their junior year. All applicants to Medical 
School of the University of Maryland over 
the past 10 years have been required to 
take this test without exception and no 
application was considered until the test 
scores were in the committee's hands. 
Furthermore no applicant could take the 
test later than the October preceding the 
year of desired admission. 

By agreement among themselves medical 
schools do not release the scores of appli- 
cants although they are permitted to tell 
the applicant whether or not he has met 
the standards of his particular school and 
how he stands in comparison to other appli- 
cants to this school and to other schools. 
The applicant may repeat the test one 
year later or sooner if he can persuade 
some medical school to give him permission 
to do so. Substantial improvement on repe- 
tition of the test seldom occurs. 

The MCAT is a particularly useful tool 
for admission committees since it gives an 
objective measure by which all those who 
took the test at that time can be compared 
with one another. Since there are usually 
about 8,000 students in each test group 
the sampling is reasonably broad. Thus 
applicant A from School X can be com- 



pared with applicant B from School Y and 
hopefully some measure of their relative 
ability will emerge. From time to time the 
testing agency compiles the mean scores 
of all the students in any one college who 
have taken the test over a stipulated period. 
This compilation can be used as a yard- 
stick to compare the performances of vari- 
ous colleges and to compare the perform- 
ance of a single student with his peers in 
the same college. It therefore becomes a 
useful check on the significance of the 
GPA from any one school. 

The MCAT is divided into four cate- 
gories: verbal, quantitative, general infor- 
mation, and science and the applicant is 
scored separately in each category. The 
scale ranges from a low of 200 to a high 
of 800. Two-thirds of those taking the test 
will score between 450 and 550 and ap- 
proximately one-half will be above 500. 
Obviously a score of over 550 places the 
individual in a superior group for that 
category while a score below 450 would be 
a matter for concern especially if it is in 
verbal or science. 

Scores are not necessarily uniform in 
all categories and different schools will use 
the scores differently, some insisting on a 
minimum score in all areas, or in the 
science area alone or a combination of 
science and quantitative. Others adopt a 
less rigid attitude and are not too much 
concerned about a low score in one area 
providing other factors check out. 

iTie correlation between MCAT scores, 
especially in science, and the grades obtained 
during the first two years of medical school 
are quite good as is the correlation with the 
scores on the National Board Examination, 
Part I. The same cannot be said however 
for the correlation between MCAT scores 
and the grades in the clinical years or scores 
on the National Board, Part II. However 
again it must be borne in mind that a 
student must pass the first two years of 
medical school in order to have an oppor- 
tunity to develop his clinical skills. 

Objective multiple choice tests have been 
under considerable fire from certain aca- 
demic quarters and there are many who 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



MEniCAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



have doubts as to their validity and signifi- 
cance. There are those who are equally 
vehement in their defense. However there 
is no doubt they serve a useful purpose in 
the comparative evaluation of thousands of 
students from diverse backgrounds and with 
varying abilities. There seems to be little 
doubt that such tests are here to stay and 
that their use will spread rather than di- 
minish. Rightly or wrongly under the selec- 
tion systems \\ hich now operate for most col- 
leges and professional schools these tests 
play an important role. Furthermore a 
student's success in professional school will 
be determined to a large extent on how well 
he handles such tests sifice he must take 
them in one form or another as he ad- 
vances through his professional education. 
In evaluating an applicant his MCAT 
scores are of course compared to his GPA. 
and sometimes such comparison can be re- 
vealing. How does one interpret a low 
science score, say in the 400's, in an indi- 
vidual who has a GPA of 3 or better in his 
science subjects? Is he an over-achiever in 
this area or are the standards at his school a 
bit more rela.xed than elsewhere? Similarly 
a low GPA and a high MCAT, say over 
550 in all categories, demands some expla- 
nation. Presumably such an individual did 
not live up to his full academic potential. 
Was it because he became too deply involved 
in extra-curricular activities, was it because 
he was indifferent to grades or was it be- 
cause he had to work 20 or 30 hours a 
week to stay in school? Would such an 
individual realize his full potential in a 
medical school where the academic environ- 
ment might very well stimulate him to 
greater efforts and where financial assistance 
was more readily available. On the other 
hand would his poor college record mean 
he had not learned how to study, a handicap 
that might very well prove fatal in medical 
school. 

The Interview. Probably no other phase 
of the admission process is approached by 
the applicant with so much trepidation and 
anxiety as is the interview. Here is a face 
to face confrontation with those whose de- 
cision will be crucial in deciding his future 



course in life. No wonder the candidate 
looks upon the experience as an ordeal. 
Interviewers do their best to put the appli- 
cant at ease and usually succeed. Many 
applicants will tell you that after the initial 
tension had worn off they actually enjoyed 
the experience. Tlie interviewer too de- 
velops a certain humility as he comes to 
realize more and more that it is difficult 
to make a value judgement about a person 
on the basis of a 20 minute conversation. 

So why then go to all this trouble? Prob- 
ably members of admission committees 
spend more time on this phase of their 
work than on any other. However it has 
been aptly said that not many men will 
select a wife or a secretary without first 
speaking to her. Similarly admission 
committees are reluctant to take any one 
sight unseen. 

Nevertheless the interview does serve a 
useful purpose. Occasionally an interview 
will reveal someone who is obviously unfitted 
temperamentally or intellectually for medical 
school. However it is probable that the 
applicant benefits the most as it gives him 
a chance to familiarize himself with the 
school, to observe the classrooms and the 
laboratories and to ask questions. It also 
gives the interviewer a chance to obtain an 
explanation for anything in the application 
which he thinks needs explaining such as 
why did he do poorly in the second semester 
of his second year, why did he transfer 
from one school to another, why was he 
dropped from school and why did he volun- 
tarily withdraw for two years. Sometimes 
the answers to these questions can mean 
the difference between a favorable and un- 
favorable decision. 

Probably in the course of a year between 
four and five hundred applicants were inter- 
viewed at the Medical School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, at least 90% of them 
on campus. In some schools, but not all, 
interviewers will go to the applicant. This 
is particularly true for a college which 
will have a fairly large number of appli- 
cants applying to the school in question. 
The Medical School of the University of 
Maryland, however, has not done this in 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



the past. However they have used inter- 
viewers in distant places for applicants will 
come from all over the United States and 
it will happen that the geographical sepa- 
ration is too great to be overcome. If such 
an applicant looks promising he wUl be 
asked to seek an interview with the nearest 
local representative. Usually this regional 
representative is an alumnus of the school 
personally well known to some member of 
the committee. These men can be very 
helpful indeed and they put in many long 
hours of work for which their only reward 
is the heartfelt thanks of the committee plus 
the knowledge that they have helped to 
further the cause of medical education. 

How should the candidate approach the 
interview? Hopefully in as relaxed and 
composed frame of mind as is possible 
under the circumstances. A display of a 
normal amount of anxiety however is not 
necessarily detrimental and might even be 
advantageous. An interviewer becomes 
suspicious of a candidate who appears to 
be too blase. 

It is helpful if the applicant comes pre- 
pared with a few question of his own. He 
need not be afraid to reveal his ignorance 
as no one expects him to be sophisticated 
about medical education. It is perfectly 
natural, in fact desirable, for him to want 
to know something about the school's 
curriculum, about its clinical facilities, what 
is its drop-out rate, what provisions are 
made for financial aid to students and many 
other questions. In asking them the appli- 
cant helps to establish a rapport between 
himself and the interviewer which makes 
everything run more smoothly. 

Finally a word or two about personal 
appearance. The applicant should be dressed 
neatly in keeping with the standards of the 
medical school he aspires to enter. His 
dress should be such as to inspire respect and 
confidence. Obviously he should be courte- 
ous without being obsequious and cultivate 
a manner that is in keeping with the tra- 
ditions, the amenities and the dignity of 
the medical profession. 

Letters of Recommendation. Every com- 
mittee expects an applicant to produce 



letters of recommendation from those who 
have had some academic contact with him 
while in college. The more extensive this 
contact the better. Letters from friends 
of the family, the family doctor, the clergy, 
the local banker are not encouraged and 
are seldom given much weight if received. 

Most liberal arts colleges have today a 
premedical advisory committee with a chair- 
man who usually serves as premedical ad- 
visor for the college. This committee is 
made up of those instructors who teach 
premedical courses and therefore has a 
high proportion of science teachers. How- 
ever it is expected that the non-science areas 
will also be represented. The premedical 
advisor may or may not be a member 
of the Dean's staff. If not it is usually 
someone from the faculty who has had 
considerable experience in this field. It is 
his job to coordinate the activities of the 
committee and usually to write the letters 
based on the committee's recommendations. 
In many instances the chairman of the pre- 
medical advisory committee works closely 
with the chairman of the admission com- 
mittee of the medical school, especially if 
that particular college annually has a large 
number of applicants to the medical school 
in question. Such a relationship can be 
extremely helpful and often plays an im- 
portant role in the admission process. 

Where a special committee does not 
exist then the applicant is forced to fall 
back on individual letters from faculty mem- 
bers who will speak for him. Such letters 
are not always given the same weight as a 
committee recommendation as they repre- 
sent just one man's opinion and are not a 
consensus of several experienced men. 
Further the admission committee knows 
full well that an applicant will select those 
members of the faculty who in all prob- 
ability will speak well of him. However the 
committee does often learn to respect the 
judgment of some one individual, par- 
ticularly those who write frequently and are 
jealous of their reputation for making im- 
partial and objective judgments. 

While the decision to admit or not to 
admit an applicant is largely based on the 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



GPA; MCAT, interviews and letters of 
recommendation there are other factors 
which play a part as well and in some indi- 
vidual cases may be crucial. Perhaps the 
most important of these is the residency of 
the applicant. Since not all qualified appli- 
cants can be accepted some sort of a screen- 
ing process is inevitable if the committee is 
to keep its workload at a reasonable level. 
Since the Medical School of the University 
of Maryland is a state supported school 
preference is given to residents of the state 
and every resident regardless of his qualifi- 
cations is given careful and thorough con- 
sideration. If he is qualified he is accepted 
and during the past 10 years no Maryland 
applicant has been rejected because there 
was no place for him. This unfortunately 
cannot be said of non-residents. 

In the same category as residents are 
placed the sons and daughters of alumni 
of the university. While the term alumni 
has never been strictly defined by the com- 
mittee it certainly includes anyone who has 
received a degree from any school or college 
of the University of Maryland. This applies 
doubly so to sons and daughters of alumni 
of the medical school. While all "legacies" 
receive special attention regardless of 
residency they are expected to meet the 
minimum qualifications before being ac- 
cepted the same as anyone else. 

So far as non-residents are concerned pre- 
liminary screening cannot be avoided. Those 
selected for further consideration and in- 
vited to come in for an interview or to be 
interviewed by a local representative are 
those with promising MCAT scores and 
high GPA's. The committee is also not 
unaware of geography and a promising 
applicant from an area which does not send 
many applicants to the school will prob- 
ably receive more serious consideration than 
someone from a contiguous state. This is 
not to say that candidates from these areas 
are ruled out. Quite the contrary, because 
of the fact that their number is large they 
are usually well represented in the student 
body. 

The committee is also interested in having 
as broad a representation from the colleges 



as possible, especially those colleges which 
have a high reputation in the academic com- 
munity. Applicants who fall into this cate- 
gory with a good academic record and high 
MCAT scores are actively sought out by 
several schools since they usually apply to 
more than one. Competition is therefore 
keen for these students and as a consequence 
the ratio of those students who actually 
matriculate at Maryland to those who are 
sent offers is low. In such cases the de- 
cision may turn on the prestige of the school, 
the possibility of a scholarship or financial 
aid and personal preferences in regard to 
geographic location or a desire to work with 
some distinguished member of the faculty. 

In state supported schools there should 
be no discrimination on the basis of sex, 
religion, or race and such is most em- 
phatically the case at Maryland. As to sex 
there is a widespread belief that prejudice 
exists towards women. This may or may 
not be true in some schools but it is 
definitely not the case at Maryland. Over 
the years the percentage of women in the 
student body has stayed constant at about 
8%. Actually the number of offers sent 
to women in relation to the number of 
applicants is somewhat higher than it is 
for men. This is probably due to the fact 
the choice of medicine as a career is taken 
far more seriously by women and their 
motivation as a group somewhat stronger. 
A woman does not enter medicine without 
careful consideration of all aspects of the 
situation and if she does so decide she 
usually will make a more determined effort 
to qualify. 

As for race and religion, as mentioned 
before, they play no part in the admission 
process. The Medical School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland does not even inquire 
into these factors. 

The question often comes up concerning 
the importance of extra-curricular activities. 
It is certainly not expected that every suc- 
cessful applicant will be a campus leader, 
although it of course helps his chances if 
he is and at the same time has a good 
record. However being president of his 
class, a member of the varsity football squad. 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



editor of the yearbook does not in itself 
insure admission. The premedical curricu- 
lum is a demanding one, loaded as it is with 
science courses, and there is not much 
time for outside activities. If too much in- 
volvement in such efforts is jeopardizing 
the student's academic standing he would be 
well advised to cut down the load or elimi- 
nate it entirely. By and large if an appli- 
cant shows evidence of having normal social 
relations with his peers and a reasonable 
interest in the world around him most ad- 
mission committees will be satisfied. 

Finally the question of age. It is rare 
indeed for an individual over 30 to be ac- 
cepted and applicants from this group are 
discouraged even though they be residents 
of Maryland. As he advances beyond 30 his 
chances dwindle rapidly and it is almost 
unheard of to take anyone over 35. Ex- 
perience has shown that older applicants 
are not as good an academic risk as the 
younger ones, although there are occasional 
exceptions. In addition it is perfectly obvi- 



ous that the number of years of effective 
service to the community is statistically less 
the older an applicant may be. 

Hopefully this summary will help po- 
tential applicants to medical school and their 
parents to understand some of the problems 
facing an admission committee and what 
the applicant may expect. It is in this spirit 
that this article is written. Certainly medi- 
cine is looking for bright, alert, honest and 
dedicated young people to enter its ranks. 
Competition between professional schools 
for such individuals is keen and medical 
schools must make it clear they welcome 
such applications. An applicant does not 
necessarily have to be a Phi Beta Kappa 
or to graduate cum laiide to be in the run- 
ning. On the other hand it is also hoped 
that aspiring applicants who obviously do 
not measure up adopt a realistic attitude 
about their chances and if they are rejected 
to accept the decisions philosophically and 
turn their efforts towards some other goal. 



Vol. 51. No. 2 



DEPARTMENT 

OF 

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY 



Annual Report 



Summary of Admissions, Discharges 

and 

Perinatal Mortality 

University Hospital 

January 1, 1964 through December 31, 1964 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Obstetrical Report for the University Hospital 
For Period January 1, 1964 through December 31, 1964 

I. SUMMARY 



Total Discharges 

Total Deliveries 

Multiple Pregnancies 

Twins (No. of sets) 

By Cesarean section 

Triplets (No. of sets) 

By Cesarean section 

Total Adult Deaths 

Rates per 1000 live births 

Total Live Births 

Total Fetal Deaths 

Rate per 1000 total births 

Total Neonatal Deaths 

Rate per 1000 total births 

Total Perinatal Mortality 

Rate per 1000 total births 

Perinatal Mortality (1000 grams & over) 

Rate per 1000 total births 



932 

870 

5 









0.00 

858 

12 

13.79 

18 

20.69 

30 

34.48 

24 

27.78 



2099 
1972 

27 

1 







0.00 

1928 

44 

22.31 

45 

22.82 

89 

45.13 

57 

29.41 



3031 

2842 

32 

1 







0.00 

2786 

56 

19.70 

63 

22.17 

119 

41.87 

81 

28.91 



II. TOTAL DISCHARGES BY TYPE OF DELIVERY 



Abortion*, completion of 

Abortion, spontaneous 

Abortion, therapeutic 

Ectopic pregnancy, early 

Ectopic pregnancy, late 

Full Term, spontaneous delivery. . 
Full Term, operative delivery . . . . 
Prematuret, spontaneous delivery 
Premature, operative delivery . . . . 
ImmatureJ, spontaneous delivery . 

Immature, operative delivery 

Postpartum admission 

Discharged undelivered 

Not pregnant 

Died undelivered 

Total Discharges 

Percentage 





3 







341 

433 

52 

38 

4 

2 



59 





932 

30.7 



1 

12 

2 





1029 

591 

193 

125 

22 

12 



112 





2099 

69.3 



1 

15 

2 





1370 

1024 

245 

163 

26 

14 



171 





3031 

100.0 



* An abortion is any fetus or infant weighing between 0-499 gm. 

t A premature is any fetus or infant weighing between 1000-2499 gm. 

X An immature is any fetus or infant weighing between 500-999 gm. 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



DEPARTMEST OF OBSTETRICS AND CVS ECOLOGY— AS SU AL REPORT 



m. TOTAL DISCHARGES BY REASON FOR ADMISSION 



True labor 

Suspected labor 

Elective induction 

Indicated induction 

Postpartum admission 

Ectopic pregnancy 

Elective section 

Abortion, threatened 

Abortion, completion of . . . 

Abortion, therapeutic 

Obstetrical disease 

Medical disease 

Surgical disease 

Mole and Chorio-carcinoma 

Not pregnant 

Special study 

Total 



681 

30 

37 

21 





13 



3 



147 













1567 

27 
3 

20 



40 


15 

422 
2 
3 






2248 
57 
40 

41 



53 


18 

569 
2 
3 






2099 



3031 



IV. SERVICE STATUS 





Race 


Private 


Ward 


Total 




No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


White 


489 
443 


52.5 
47.5 


2041 
58 


97.2 
2.8 


2530 
501 


83.5 


Xon-White 


16.5 


Total 


932 


100.0 


2099 


100.0 


3031 


100.0 



v.— A AGE AND PARITY— TOTAL PATIENTS DELIVERED 

White Discharges 





PARITY 


Total 


Perinatal 
Mortality 







1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 & 
Over 


Un- 
known 


No. 


% 


Under 15 . . . 

15-19 

20-24 

25-29 

30-34 

35-39 

40-14 

4.5-49 

50 and over. 


4 

117 

77 

27 

5 

3 










25 

97 

47 

17 

6 

2 








12 

76 

62 

23 

8 

3 








4 

30 

33 

25 

9 

4 










16 

24 

13 

7 

2 








7 

20 
7 

11 
3 







10 
8 
3 
2 







3 
4 
4 









1 
1 

1 










2 
1 









1 
2 
1 















4 

158 

303 

227 

106 

55 

17 






0(0) 
5(1) 
12(3) 
6(1) 
3(1) 
2(0) 
2(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 


0.0 
3.2 
4.0 
2.6 
2.8 
3.6 
11.8 
0.0 
0.0 


Total 


233 


194 


184 


105 


62 


48 


23 


11 


3 


3 


4 





870 


30(6) 


3.4 


Perinatal 

Mortality 
No. 


9(2) 
3.9 


6(1) 
3.1 


4(1) 
2.2 


3(0) 
2.9 


4(0) 
6.5 


1(1) 
2.1 


1(1) 
4.3 


1(0) 
9.1 


0(0) 
0.0 


0(0) 
0.0 


1(0) 
25.0 


0(0) 
0.0 


30(6) 
3.4 






Per Cent . . . 





The numbers in ( ) indicate immature deaths. 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



v.— B AGE AND PARITY— TOTAL PATIENTS DELIVERED 
Non-White Discharges 





PARITY 


Total 


Perinatal 
Mortality 


AGE 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 & 
Over 


Un- 
known 


No. 


% 


Under 15 


22 

282 

103 

14 

4 

5 

1 








169 

140 

33 

17 

9 










50 

169 

55 

27 

14 

2 








15 

87 

53 

33 

13 









3 

58 
55 
34 
15 
8 








36 

76 

34 

18 

4 










15 

42 

25 

21 

5 

1 








4 

27 

30 

20 

3 








3 
8 
19 
11 
6 







3 
17 
7 
3 
1 






3 

13 
17 
10 















22 

519 

615 

369 

253 

150 

42 

2 




0(0) 

23(10) 

24(10) 
14(4) 
14(6) 
12(2) 
2(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 





15-19 

20-24 

25-29 


4.4 
3.9 
3 8 


30-34 

35-39 


5.5 
8 


40^4 


4 8 


45^9 

50 and over 


0.0 
0.0 


Total 


431 


368 


317 


201 


173 


168 


109 


84 


47 


31 


43 





1972 


89(32) 


4.5 


Perinatal 
Mortality 
































No 


19(10) 
4.4 


14(5) 
3.8 


16(3) 
5.0 


13(7) 
6.5 


5(2) 
2.9 


8(1) 
4.8 


2(1) 
1.8 


2(0) 
2.4 


3(0) 
6.4 


3(1) 
9.7 


4(2) 
9.3 


0(0) 
0.0 


89(32) 
4.5 






Per Cent 









VI.— A PRENATAL CARE— TOTAL PATIENTS DELIVERED 





White 


Non-White 


Total 


Perinatal Mortality 


Number of Prenatal Visits 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 




1-3 

4r^ 

7-9 


65 
73 
132 
189 
105 
65 
107 
134 


7.5 
8.4 
15.2 
21.7 
12.1 
7.5 
12.3 
15.4 


158 

307 

521 

501 

273 

94 

61 

57 


8.0 
15.6 
26.4 
25.4 
13.8 
4.8 
3.1 
2.9 


223 
380 
653 
690 
378 
159 
168 
191 


7.8 
13.4 
23.0 
24.3 
13.3 
5.6 
5.9 
6.7 


26(13) 
26(13) 
29(6) 
11(0) 
8(0) 
4(0) 
6(2) 
9(4) 


11.7 
6.8 
4.4 
1.6 


10-12 


2.1 


13 or more 

Elsewhere 


2.5 
3.6 
4.7 






Total 


870 


100.0 


1972 


100.0 


2842 


100.0 


119(38) 


4.2 



VI.— B TIME OF FIRST VISIT 





White 


Non-White 


Total 


Perinatal Mortality 




No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


13 weeks or earlier 


65 
350 
165 
118 


7.5 
40.2 
19.0 
13.6 


156 

906 

639 

52 


7.9 
45.9 
32.4 

2.6 


221 

1256 

804 

170 


7.8 
44.2 
28.3 

6.0 


8(1) 

44(9) 

26(9) 
9(4) 


3.6 
3.5 


28 weeks or later 


3.2 
5.3 






Total 


698 


80.2 


1753 


88.9 


2451 


86.2 


87(23) 


3.5 







Vol. 51, No. 2 



DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 



Vn. PRESENTATIONS— TOTAL INFANTS 





White 


Non-White 


Total 


Perinatal Mortality 


Presentation 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 




831 

29 

2 

3 


4 

1 


95.5 
3.3 
0.2 
0.3 
0.0 
0.5 
0.1 


1876 
72 
11 
2 
2 
9 



95.1 
3.7 
0.6 
0.1 
0.1 
0.5 
0.0 


2707 

101 

13 

5 

2 
13 

1 


95.2 
3.6 
0.5 
0.2 
0.1 
0.5 
0.0 


85(23) 
25(12) 
3(1) 
1(0) 
0(0) 
4(2) 
1(0) 


3.1 




24.8 




23.1 




20.0 


Compound 


0.0 
30.8 


Unknown 


100.0 


Total 


870 


100.0 


1972 


100.0 


2842 


100.0 


119(38) 


4.2 


Twins 

Triplets 


10 



1.1 
0.0 


54 



2.7 
0.0 


64 



2.3 
0.0 


8(2) 
0(0) 


12.5 
0.0 



*Breech Perinatal Mortality 



500-999 gm 

1000-1499 gm... 
1500-1999 gm... 
2000-2499 gm. . . 
2500 gm. & over . 

Total 



1 


3.4 


12 


16.7 


13 


12.9 


3 


10.3 


9 


12.5 


12 


11.9 





0.0 


13 


18.1 


13 


12.9 


4 


13.8 


7 


9.7 


11 


10.9 


21 


72.4 


31 


43.1 


52 


51.5 


29 


100.0 


72 


100.0 


101 


100.0 



92.3 
58.3 

7.7 
9.1 

7.7 



25 



24.8 



Mortality 1000 grams and over — 12.9%. 

Vm. METHOD OF DELIVERY— TOTAL INFANTS 



Perinatal 

Mortality 



Vagina! deliveries 

1. Total forceps deliveries 

Low forceps, elective 

Low forceps, indicated 

Mid forceps, elective 

Mid forceps, indicated 

High forceps 

Vacuum extractor, elective.. . . 
Vacuum extractor, indicated. . 
Failed forceps /extractor 

2. Breech 

Spontaneous 

Assisted 

Extraction 

Decomposition & Extraction. , 

3. Other operations 

Version and extraction (single) 
Version and extraction 

(second twin) 

Manual rotation, head only. . . 

Rotation of shoulders 

Destructive operations 

Conversion only 

4. Spontaneous 

Abdominal deliveries 

1. Cesarean section 

2. Rupture of uterus 

3. Advanced ectopic pregnancy. . 



400 

306 



93 
1 





25 
2 
6 

16 
1 
2 




1 





1 

395 

48 

47 

1 





46.0 


551 


35.2 


417 


0.0 





10.7 


134 


0.1 





0.0 





0.0 





0.0 





0.0 


2 


2.9 


54 


0.2 


12 


0.7 


13 


1.8 


27 


0.1 


2 


0.2 


6 


0.0 


1 


0.0 


4 


0.1 


1 








0.0 





0.1 





45.4 


1232 


5.5 


129 


5.4 


128 


0.1 





0.0 


1 



27.9 
21.1 
0,0 
6.S 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.1 
2.7 
0.6 
0.7 
1.4 
0.1 
0.3 
0.1 

0.2 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
62.5 
6.5 
6.5 
0.0 
0.1 



951 

723 



227 

1 







2 

79 

14 

19 

43 

3 

8 

1 

4 

2 





1 

1627 

177 

175 

1 

1 



33.5 
25.4 
0.0 
8.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.1 
2.8 
0.5 
0.7 
1.5 
0.1 
0.3 
0.0 

0.1 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
57.2 
6.2 
6.2 
0.0 
0.0 



16(2 

12(1 
0(0 
4(1 
0(0 
0(0 
0(0 
0(0 
0(0 

19(8 
4(2 
5(3 

10(3 
0(0 
2(2 
1(1 

1(1 

0(0 

0(0 

0(0 

0(0 

61(22 

21(4 

19(3 

1(0 

1(1 



1.7 

1.7 

0.0 

1.8 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

24.1 

28.6 

26.3 

23.3 

0.0 

25.0 

100.0 

25.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
3.7 
11.9 
10.9 
100.0 
100.0 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



EX. ANCILLARY OPERATIVE PROCEDURES FOR LABOR AND DELIVERY 



Perinatal 
Mortality 



A. Induction of labor 

Oxytocic 

Rupture of membranes 

Rupture of membranes and 

oxytocic 

Stripping of membranes 

Stripping of membranes and 

oxytocic 

Other 

Total Inductions 

(Perinatal mortality over 1000 

grams 0.0%) 

Total Elective Inductions.. . 

B. Miscellaneous 
Decompression of hydrocephalus. 
Forceps to after-coming head . . . 
Manual removal of placenta, 

elective 

Manual removal of placenta, 

indicated 

Oxytocic stimulation of labor . . . 
(Perinatal mortality over 1000 
grams 0.0%.) 
Elective Oxytocic Stimulation 

Tran8fusion(s) 

Exploration of Uterus 

C. Episiotomies and lacerations 
Median 

3rd degree lacerations 

4th degree lacerations 

Mediolateral 

3rd degree lacerations 

4th degree lacerations 

Total Episiotomies 

3rd degree laceration spontaneous, 
repair of 

4th degree laceration spontaneous, 
repair of 

Cervical laceration, repair of. . 

Vaginal laceration, repair of . . 

D. Other procedures 
Appendectomy, incidental .... 

Other gyn. oper 

Other surg. oper 

Hysterorrhaphy 



32 



20 



30 
9 
1 

567 

9 

20 

55 

1 





7.8 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

7.8 



0.0 

1.1 



0.6 
1.5 



3.4 
1.0 
0.1 

65.2 
1.0 
2.3 
6.3 
0.1 
0.0 



40 

39 

6 

919 

20 

25 

50 

1 





2.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 
2.0 



0.0 
0.2 



0.9 
1.0 



2.0 
2.0 
0.3 

46.6 
1.0 
1.3 
2.5 
0.1 
0.0 



107 









107 



35 



33 



1486 

29 

45 

105 

2 





3.8 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 
3.8 



0.0 
0.5 



0.8 
1.2 



2.5 
1.7 
0.2 

52.3 
1.0 
1.6 
3.7 
0.1 
0.0 



4(1) 
0(0) 

0(0) 
0(0) 

0(0) 
0(0) 
4(1) 



0(0) 

0(0) 
3(0) 



1(1) 
8(5) 



3.7 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 
3.7 



0.0 



0.0 

21.4 



3.0 
11.4 



74.9 



51.5 



1667 



58.7 



0.0 
0.1 
0.3 

0.6 
0.1 
0.9 
0.1 



0.2 
0.7 
0.7 

0.1 
0.0 
0.9 
0.0 



0.1 
0.5 
0.6 

0.2 
0.0 
0.9 
0.0 



0(0) 
0(0) 
3(2) 
0(0) 



0.0 
0.0 
11.5 
0.0 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 



X. PUERPERAL MORBIDITY 





White 


Non-White 


Total 




No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 




49 
47 


5.6 

5.4 


149 
212 


7.6 
10.8 


198 
259 


7.0 




9.1 






Total 


96 


n.o 


361 


18.3 


457 


16.1 






Infection 

Endometritis 

Mastitis 


18 

1 
1 


13 


2.1 
0.0 
0.1 
0.1 
0.0 
1.5 


119 

8 
5 
4 
1 
65 


6.0 
0.4 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
3.3 


137 

8 
6 
5 

1 
78 


4.8 
0.3 
0.2 




0.2 


Peritonitis 


0.0 

2.7 






Other Complications 

Respiratory Disease 

Abdominal Wound Dehiscience 

Postspinal SjTnptoms 


5 
3 
1 


0.6 
0.3 
0.1 


14 
1 
2 


0.7 
0.1 
0.1 


19 
4 
3 


0.7 
0.1 
0.1 



XI. COMPLICATIONS 



Perinatal 
Mortality 



A. Antepartum hemorrhage 

Placenta previa 

Abruptio placentae 

Rupture of uterus 

Traumatic 

Previous section, severe . . . 

Previous section, incidental 
Other causes 

Total 

B. Postpartum hemorrhage 

Early 

Late 

Hematomata 

Total 

C. Anemia 

Less than 5 gm 

5.0- 5.9 gm 

6.0- 6.9 gm 

7.0- 7.9 gm 

8.0- 8.9 gm 

9.0- 9.9 gm 

10.0-10.9 gm 

11 gm. and over 

Unknown 

Total 



0.7 
1.4 
0.1 
0.0 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 



0.6 
1.9 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.2 



0.6 
1.7 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.1 



2(2) 
21(6) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
1(0) 
0(0) 
1(1) 



11.1 

42.9 

0.0 

0.0 

100.0 

0.0 

33.3 



2.5 



25(9) 



35.2 



1.8 
0.0 
0.0 



2.9 
0.0 
0.0 



2.6 
0.0 
0.0 



1.8 



58 



2.6 









4 

4 

20 

53 

764 

25 



0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.5 
0.5 
2.3 
6.1 
87.8 
2.9 





1 



5 

8 

134 

350 

1442 

32 



0.0 
0.1 
0.0 
0.3 
0.4 
6.8 
17.7 
73.1 
1.6 





1 



9 

12 

154 

403 

2206 

57 



0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.3 
0.4 
5.4 
14.2 
77.6 
2.0 



0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
2(2) 
3(1) 
8(1) 
18(5) 
83(25) 
5(4) 



0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
22.2 
25.0 
5.2 
4.5 
3.8 



870 



100.0 



1972 



100.0 



2842 



100.0 



119(38) 



4.2 



April. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



XI. COMPLICATIONS (Cont.) 





White 


Non-White 


Total 


Perinatal 

Mortality 




No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


D. Toxemia 

Pre-eclampsia — mild 

Pre-eclampsia — severe 

Eclampsia — antepartum 

Eclampsia — intrapartum 

Eclampsia — postpartum 


27 
2 





3.1 
0.2 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


73 

5 
2 


2 


3.7 
0.3 
0.1 
0.0 
0.1 


100 

7 
2 

2 


3.5 
0.2 
0.1 
0.0 
0.1 


7(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 


7.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 




29 


3.3 


82 


4.2 


111 


3.9 


7(0) 


6.3 






Chronic hyper, with toxemia 

Chronic hyper, without tox 



16 


0.0 
1.8 


11 
120 


0.6 
6,1 


11 
136 


0.4 

4.8 


1(0) 
9(2) 


9.1 
6.6 




16 


1.8 


131 


6.6 


147 


5.2 


10(2) 


6 8 








1 


0.1 





0.0 


1 


0.0 


0(0) 









Total Toxemia 


46 


5.3 


213 


10.8 


259 


9.1 


17(2) 


6.6 






E. Medical complications 

Heart disease 


2 
1 
1 



1 



2 
114 
3 
6 


5 
1 
2 
8 
21 

1 
3 
4 

1 

1 



0.2 
0.1 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.2 
13.1 
0.3 
0.7 
0.0 

0.6 
0.1 
0.2 
0.9 
2.4 

0.1 
0.3 
0.5 
0.0 
0.1 
0.0 
0.1 
0.0 


4 
3 
1 

1 
1 


3 
124 
2 
8 
5 

6 

5 

1 

29 

39 

2 
18 
19 

4 





0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.0 
0.1 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.2 
6.3 
0.1 
0.4 
0.3 

0.3 
0.3 
0.1 
1.5 
2.0 

0.1 
0.9 
1.0 
0.0 
0.2 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


6 

4 
2 

1 
2 


5 
238 
5 
14 
5 

11 

6 

3 

37 

60 

3 
21 
23 

5 

1 



0.2 
0.1 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.1 
8.4 
0.2 
0.5 
0.2 

0.4 
0.2 
0.1 
1.3 
2.1 

0.1 
0.7 
0.8 

0.2 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
10(5) 
0(0) 
1(0) 
1(0) 

6(2) 
0(0) 
3(0) 
11(5) 
1(1) 

0(0) 
2(2) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 


0.0 



Failure 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 


0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


Other pulmonary disease 


0.0 





0.0 




0.0 




4.2 


Rubella 


0.0 




7.1 


Abnormal glucose tol. test 

F. Cord pathology 

Prolapse — Vaginal deliveries 

Prolapse — Abdominal deliveries . . 
Other 


20.0 

54.5 

0.0 

100.0 




29.7 




1.7 


I. Labor over 20 hours — 
method of delivery 


0.0 




9.5 


Low forceps, elective 

Low forceps, indicated 


0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


Mid forceps, indicated 


0.0 
0.0 


Other 


0.0 






Total 


10 


1.1 


43 


2.2 


53 


1.9 


2(2) 


3.8 








2 
9 


0.2 
1.0 


6 
56 


0.3 

2.8 


8 
65 


0.3 
2.3 


1(0) 
1(0) 


12.5 




1.5 







Vol. 51, No. 2 



DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 



XII. ABDOMINAL OPERATIONS 





White 


Non-White 


Total 


Perinatal 
Mortality 




Prim. 


Repeat 


Prim. 


Repeat 


Prim. 


Repeat 


Prim. 


Repeat 


A. Cesarean sections 


22 
5 
3 
1 




4 
12 






47 
5 

15 
2 



69 


27 
16 
6 
10 




69 
10 
18 
3 




31 
28 
6 
10 




11.6 
10.0 
27.8 
33.3 
0.0 
0.0 


6.5 


Low cervical and sterilization .... 


0.0 
16.7 


Classical and sterilization 

E.xtraperitoneal 


10.0 
0.0 
0.0 






Total Sections 


31 


16 


59 


100 


75 


15.0 


5.3 


Indications 

1. Pelvic contractions and 
mechanical dystocia 


3 
6 

3 


1 
2 




4 











8 
5 

14 
4 
3 
1 
6 




23 











11 
11 


17 
4 
3 
2 
8 




27 











0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
50.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 

50.0 


3.7 
























0.0 

















Tumor blocking birth canal 


0.0 


Total 


12 


4 


27 


23 


39 


27 


3 7 






2. Previous uterine surgery 

Previous cesarean section 

Previous myomectomy 







11 









29 









40 




0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


2.5 
0.0 
0.0 






Total 





11 





29 





40 

3 
3 



0.0 


2 5 






3. Hemorrhage 


5 
3 



1 




8 
10 



2 
3 



13 
13 



25.0 

62.5 

0.0 





Placenta previa 

Other 


100.0 
0.0 






Total 


8 


1 


18 


5 


26 


6 


100.0 


100 






4. Toxemia 


















1 
2 












1 

2 












0.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 





Eclampsia 

Chronic hypertension 


0.0 












Total 





3 





3 





0.0 


0.0 


5. Intercurrent diseases 


2 





1 





3 





33.3 









6. Miscellaneous Total 



3 
1 


2 











3 
3 
1 
2 
2 



1 

1 






6 
4 
1 
2 
4 



1 
1 





0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
50.0 










Prolapsed cord 


0.0 
0.0 




0.0 


Other 


0.0 






B. Cesarean hysterectomy 








































D. Laparotomies 




1 


1 



1 
1 






Rupture of uterus 





April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



XIII. DELIVERIES (INFANTS) WITH PREVIOUS SECTION 



Repeat section 

Vaginal deliveries 

Spontaneous 

Low forceps, elective 

Low forceps, indicated 

Mid forceps, elective 

Breech, spontaneous 

Breech, extraction 

Breech, decomposition & extraction 
Other (specify) 

Total 



1.8 

0.2 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.1 



0.3 
0.1 
0.0 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 



0.2 
0.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 



4(0) 

0(0) 
1(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
0(0) 
1(0) 



5.3 

0.0 
33.3 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
100.0 



2.3 



67 



3.4 



6(0) 



XIV. THERAPEUTIC ABORTIONS 





White 


Non-White 


Total 




No. 


No. 


No. 


Indications : 





1 


1 







XV. STERILIZATION 



Type of Operation 

Tubal, puerperium 

Tubal, not pregnant 

Accompanying cesarean section 

Accompanying therapeutic abortion. 
Hysterectomy, with cesarean section 

Hysterectomy, puerperal, steril 

X-ray 

Total 

Indications for Sterilization 

Multiple cesarean sections 

Multiparity 

Other 

Total 



21 


7 


28 











18 


33 


51 























1 


1 












Vol. 51, No. 2 



DEPARTMEXT OF OBSTETRICS A.\'D GYXECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 



XVI ADULT DEATHS 



Total Births 

Maternal deaths 

Kate per 1000 births 

Total Registered Birtlis 

jSIaternal deaths (registered patients) 

Rate per 1000 registered births 



2842 


0.00 

2451 


0.00 



XVn. MALFORMATIONS 



Perinatal 
Mortality 



Club Foot 

Polydaetylism 

Undescended Testes. . . 

Hypospadias 

Mouth 

CXS System 

Cardiovascular System 
Other 

Total 



3 


3 


6 


2(0) 


1 


8 


9 


2(0) 


1 


3 


4 


1(0) 


1 


5 


6 


0(0) 





1 


1 


0(0) 


8 


8 


16 


7(1) 


8 


15 


23 


7(1) 


3 


9 


12 


3(0) 


20 


45 


65 


16(2) 



33.3 
22.2 
25.0 
0.0 
0.0 
43.8 
30.4 
25.0 



24.6 



XVm. CAUSE OF PERINATAL DEATH 





White 


Non-White 


Total 





5 
1 
8 
6 


1 
8 

1 




3 

2 

29 

20 

3 

3 

2 

27 











8 




3 




37 




26 




3 




3 




3 




35 







Other 


1 






Total 


30 


89 


119 







XIX. INFANTS DELIVERED 
A. Total Live Births According to Weight and Condition at Discharge 





White 


Non-White 


Total 




Live 
Births 


Died 


% 


Live 
Births 


Died 


% 


Live 
Births 


Died 


% 


500- 999 


5 

6 

14 

66 

767 


5 
4 


9 


100.0 

66.7 

0.0 

0.0 

1.2 


15 

29 

82 

195 

1607 


13 
11 
6 

7 
8 


86.7 

37.9 

7.3 

3.6 

0.5 


20 

35 

96 

261 

2374 


18 
15 
6 
7 
17 


90 


1000-1499 


42 9 


1500-1999 


6 3 


2000-2499 

2500 and over 


2.7 
0.7 


Total 


858 


18 


2.1 


1928 


45 


2.3 


2786 


63 


2.3 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



B. Total Stillbirths According to Weight 



Birth Weight Grams 


White 


Non-White 


Total 


Total 
Births 


Still- 
births 


% 


Total 
Births 


Still- 
births 


% 


Total 
Births 


Still- 
births 


% 


600- 999 


6 

8 
15 
67 

774 


1 

2 
1 

1 
7 


16.7 

25.0 

6.7 

1.5 

0.9 


34 
33 
89 
196 
1620 


19 
4 
7 
1 

13 


55.9 
12.1 
7.9 
0.5 
0.8 


40 

41 

104 

263 

2394 


20 
6 
8 
2 

20 


50 


1000-1499 

1500-1999 

2000-2499 


14.6 

7.7 
8 


2500 and over 


0.8 


Total 


870 


12 


1.4 


1972 


44 


2.2 


2842 


56 


2 







C. Total Perinatal Deaths According to Weight 



Birth Weight Grams 


White 


Non-White 


Total 


Total 
Births 


Peri- 
natal 
Deaths 


% 


Total 
Births 


Peri- 
natal 
Deaths 


% 


Total 
Births 


Peri- 
natal 
Deaths 


% 


500- 999 ... 


6 

8 
15 

67 

774 


6 

6 
1 

1 
16 


100.0 

75.0 

6.7 

1.5 

2.1 


34 
33 
89 
196 
1620 


32 

15 
13 

8 
21 


94.1 

45.5 

14.6 

4.1 

1.3 


40 

41 

104 

263 

2394 


38 
21 

14 

9 

37 


95.0 


1000-1499 

1500-1999 

2000-2499 

2500 and over 


51.2 

13.5 

3.4 

1.5 


Total 


870 


30 


3.4 


1972 


89 


4.5 


2842 


119 


4.2 



Vol 51, No. '£ 



DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 



GYNECOLOGIC REPORT 



I. DISCHARGES PER PATIENT 





1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Total 


Number of patients 


809 


83 


13 


3 


1 


1 


910 



U. GENERAL DISCHARGE TYPE 



Number of discharges 

A. Gynecologic benign 

1. Surgical 

a. Minor, single 

b. Minor, multiple. . . 

c. Major, single 

d. Major, multiple. . . 

2. Non-operative 

3. For diagnosis only. . . 

B. Gynecologic cancer 

C. Pregnancy complications 

D. Miscellaneous 



558 

295 

192 

56 



133 

3 

53 

50 

165 



479 

285 

155 

26 



129 



19 

111 

94 

81 

19 



1037 

580 

347 

82 



262 

3 

72 

161 

259 

169 

29 



in. DEATHS 



A. Operative 

B. Non-operative 

C. Diagnosis only 

D. Cancer 

E. Pregnancy complications . 

F. Miscellaneous 



Total. 



IV. TRANSFERS 



Number . 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



V. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY GYNECOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS 
A. Vulva 



D. Uterus 



Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 


Abscess, Bartholin's 

gland 

Cyst, Bartholin's gland. 
Hymen, Imperforate . . . 
Papilloma of Vulva .... 
Sebaceous Cyst, Vulva. . 

Endometriosis 

Other 


9 

1 
1 

1 

1 
2 




1 
1 







Total 


15 


2 



B. Vagina 



Cyst, Gartner's duct . 

Cystocele 

Endometriosis 

Enterocele 

Prolapse 

Rectoeele 

Vaginitis, fungus 

Stricture 

Urethrocele 

Incomplete tear 

Syphilis 

Hematoma 

Fistula, Vesicovaginal 
from trauma 

Total 



C. Cervix 



Cervicitis, acute 

Cervicitis, chronic . . . 

Cyst, Nabothian 

Erosion 

Laceration 

Polyp 

Prolapse, stump 

Basal cell hyperplasia 

Stenosis 

Endometriosis 

Total 




7 
162 
13 
2 
1 
3 

1 

1 



Adenomyosis 

Anomaly 

Endometritis, acute. . . 
Endometritis, chronic. . 
Endometrium, atrophic 
Endometrium, 

hyperplasia 

Endometrium, 

proliferative 

Endometrium, 

secretory 

Fibromyomata 

Polyp, endometrial. . . . 

Prolapse 

Retroversion 

Hyperplasia 

Subinvolution of 

placental site 

Total 



Primary Secondary 




Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 


Abscess, tubo-ovarian 

(intact) 

Abscess, tubo-ovarian 


8 

4 

8 
U 
10 
1 


1 


1 



Endometriosis 

Hydrosalpinx 

Salpingitis, acute 

Salpingitis, chronic 

Perisalpingitis, acute . . . 
Perisalpingitis, chronic. 
Other 


1 

7 
6 
28 

2 



Total 


46 


45 







Vol. 51. No. 2 



DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 

V. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY GYNECOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS (Conl.) 

F. Ovary G. Other Gynecologic Diagnosis 



Diagnosis 


Primary Secondary 


Brenner tumor 

Cyst, corpus luteum.. . . 

Cyst, dermoid 

Cyst, follicular 

Cyst, parovarian 

Cyst, simple 

Cyst, undetermined .... 
Cystadenoma, 

pseudomucinous 

Cystadenoma, serous. . . 

Endometritis 

Fibroma 

Oophoritis, chronic 

Other 

Ovaries, poly cystic 

(S. L. Diseases) 



7 

6 

1 
2 

2 
2 
3 


1 
3 

4 

1 


2 
10 
2 
5 

1 
1 

1 


3 

2 

1 


1 






Total 


32 


29 



Diagnosi 



Abscess, pelvic 

Amenorrhea, 

hypothalamic 

Bleeding, functional 

uterine 

Bleeding, 

postmenopausal . . . 

Cellulitis, pelvic 

Endometriosis, pelvic 

Infertility 

Mass, adnexal 

Peritonitis, pelvic. . . . 
Smear, Pap. 

Inconclusive 

Sterility 

Sterilization 

Pelvic, congestive. . . . 
Post hysterectomy 

Bleeding 

Smear, Pap. Positive. 
Others 

Total 



VI. CANCER (Based on Patients) 
A. Vulva 



30 



Irradiated 



Operations 



Irradiated 
and Operated 



Adenocarcinoma. 
Epidermoid 



2. Complications 



Carcinoma metastatic to lymph of 
groin 



B. Vagina 



1. Diagnosis 


Number of 
Patients 


Irradiated 


Operations Irradiated Medical 
[and Operated! 


Epidermoid 

Adenocarcinoma 


2 

1 


1 






1 


1 




C. Cervix 



1. Diagnosis 


Number of i„adiated 
Patients 


Operations 


Irradiated 
and Operated 


Medical 


Adenocarcinoma 

Carcinoma in situ 

Squamous cell 


2 

14 

117 




7 
70 


1 

4 
28 







1 
3 
19 


Total 133 


77 


33 





23 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VI. CANCER (Based on Patients) (Cont.) 
C. Cervix (Cont.) 



2. Complications 



Cellulitis, pelvic 

Fistula, rectovaginal (radium). . . . 
Lymph nodes in pelvis, metastatic 
Lymph nodes out of pelvis, 
metastatic 



D. Uterus 



1. Diagnosis 


Number of 
Patients 


Irradiated 


Operations 


Irradiated 
and Operated 


Medical 


Adenocarcinoma 


17 
3 
1 


2 





3 

2 



10 





2 
1 


Sarcoma 


1 


Total 


21 


2 


5 


10 


4 


2. Complications 


Number 




Lymph nodes in pelvis, metastatic . . 
Lymph nodes out of pelvis, 

metastatic 


3 
1 





E. Tubes 



1. Diagnosis 


Number of 
Patients 




Carcinoma 








F. Ovary 



1. Diagnosis 


Number of 
Patients 


Irradiated 


Operations 


Irradiated 
and Operated 


Medical 




6 

1 

8 

1 
4 


2 



1 







1 


3 










4 


Cystadenocarcinoma, 

pseudomucinous 

Cystadenocarcinoma, serous 

Granulosa cell 


1 

6 

1 

1 






Total 


20 


3 


4 





13 






2. Complications 


Number 






4 
2 

4 




Lymph nodes in pelvis, metastatic . . 
Lymph nodes out of pelvis, 

metastatic 











Vol. 51. No. 2 



DEPARTMEXT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 



VI. CANCER (Based on Patients^ (Cont.) 
G. Unknown Source 



VII. PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS 



Diagnosis 


Number of 
Patienta 


Abortion, incomplete 

Hemorrhage, postpartum, late 


98 
3 
1 




4 




30 


Pregnancy, tubal ruptured 

Pregnancy, tubal unruptured 

Secundines, retained 

Subinvolution of placental site 


25 
3 
1 
4 


Total 


169 







VIII. OTHER SYSTEMS— DIAGNOSIS 
A. Rectum D. Ureters 



Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 


Other 





1 






Total 





1 







Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 





2 


2 




1 






Total 


2 


3 



E. Kidneys 



Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 


Caruncle 

Diverticulum 

Polvp .... 


1 
1 

1 

2 
6 
3 
2 








Urethritis, chronic 

Incontinence 

Stricture 


1 

4 
2 


Others 





Total 


16 


7 



C. Bladder 



Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 


Carcinoma, metastatic. . 

Cystitis, acute 

Cystitis, chronic 

Other . . . 


3 

3 




2 
5 
1 






Total 


6 


8 







Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 


Hydronephrosis 

Other 

Pyelonephritis, acute. . . 
Pyelonephritis, chronic 
Calculus 


1 

3 
1 




4 

3 
1 
2 


Total 


5 


10 







F. Abdominal Diseases 



Diagnosis 


Primary 


Secondary 


Adhesions, peritoneal. . . 

Appendicitis 

Hernia, inguinal 

Ileus, paralytic 

No disease 

Obstruction, 

small intestine 


2 
2 



1 

1 
2 


3 


1 
1 










Total 


8 


5 



A]>ril, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



IX. OPERATIVE PROCEDURES 



A. Vulva 



D. Tubes 



Operations 



Bartholin Gland, excision 
Bartholin Gland, I&D . . . 

Biopsy 

Other". 

Vulveetom.v, complete . . . 

Vulvectomy, radical 

Hymenotomy 

Total 



B. Vagina 



Biopsy 

Colpoperineorrhaphy 

Colpoplasty, anterior 

Colpoplasty, posterior 

Colpoplasty, anterior and posterior 

Colporrhaphy 

Colpotomv, diagnostic 

Other. . . ." 

Radioactive substances, insertion of 

Total 



205 



C. Uterus and Cervix 



Cervix, biopsy 

Conization 

Dilation, cervix 

D&C, uterus, diagnostic 

D&C, uterus, incomplete abortion. . 

Excision, local, cervix 

Hysterectomy, 

radical and lymph node 

Hysterectomy, subtotal 

Hysterectomy, total abdominal ... 

Hysterectomy, total vaginal 

Hysteromj'omectomy 

Hysteropexy, other types 

Other 

Radioactive sub. inserted into cervix 
Radioactive sub. inserted into uterus 

Trachelectomy 

Trachelorrhaphy 

Uterus, insufflation of 

Hysterotomy 

Partial pelvic extent., No. American. 

Total 



425 

49 

2 

450 



2 

2 

134 

55 

4 

1 

13 

90 

88 

3 

1 

3 

3 

1 



Ligation 

Salpingectomy, unilateral, partial.. 
Salpingectomy, bilateral, partial. . . 
Salpingectomy, unilateral, complete 
Salpingectomy, bilateral, complete. 
Salpingo-oophorectomy, unilateral . 
Salpingo-oophorectomy, bilateral . . 

Salpingoplasty 

Salpingostomy 

Total 



E. Ovary 



Operations 


Number of 
Patients 




7 


Oophorectomy, unilateral, complete. 
Other " 


8 
14 


Drain of ovary, cyst, abscess, etc. . . . 

Oophorectomy, unilat., partial 

Oophorectomy, bilat., complete .... 


1 
3 

1 


Total 


34 







F. Urinary System 



Bladder, biopsy 

Cystectomy 

Cystoscopy, diagnostic. 
Cystoscopy, therapeutic 

Ileal Loop 

LVeterostomy 

Ureterectomy 

Total 



1427 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 

L\. OPERATIVE PROCEDURES (Cont.) 
G. Abdominal and Others H. Irradiation 



Diagnosis 


Number of 
Patients 




18 




40 









4 




112 




6 


Mesentery, biopsy of 


2 
44 


Peritoneocentesis 


3 

4 


Proctoscopy 

Omentectomy 


21 
1 


Total 


257 







Type 


No. of Times 


Other 


51 




89 






Total 


140 







X. MORBIDITY AND COMPLICATIONS OF OPERATIONS 
A. Minor Single 





455 


72 


2. Causes of Morbidity 


Number 




Cause unknown 


57 
10 
3 

1 
1 




Others 

Pulmonarj- 

Septicemia 




Total 


72 




3. Complications 


Number 




Cystitis 


1 
1 
3 
4 




Paralytic ileus 

Secondary Anemia 

Other. . ." 




Total 


9 





B. Minor Multiple 



1. Total 


Number 


Morbidity 




8 


2 


2. Causes of Morbidity 


Number 




Cause unknown 


2 




3. Complications 


Number 






1 








'Total 


1 





April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



X. MORBIDITY AND COMPLICATIONS OF OPERATIONS (Cent.) 
C. Major Single D. Major Multiple 



1. Total 


Number 


Morbidity 




425 


179 


2. Causes of Morbidity 


Number 





Abd. wound infection.. , 
Cause unknown 


8 
106 

1 
1 
8 
1 
51 
3 








Pulmonary 

Thrombophlebitis 




Other 








Total 


179 




3. Complications 


Number 




Atelectasis 

Paralytic ileum 

Postoperative 

hemorrhage 

Pulm. embolism 

Pj-elonephritis 

Respiratory disease ... 

Secondary anemia 

Urinary retention 

Wound infection 

Other 


1 
9 

1 
1 
2 
5 

10 

2 

7 

25 

11 

1 




Evisceration 




Total 


75 









1. Total 


Number 


Morbidity 




8 


5 


2. Causes of Morbidity 


Number 




Abd. wound infection.. . 
Pelvic abscess 






Cause unknown 

Peritonitis 








Total 


5 








3. Complications 


Number 




Paralytic ileum 

Wound breakdown 


1 
1 




Total 


2 





DEATHS 

L.W. UH -26-87-98, 25 yr. old W.F. ad. 1/7/64 V.G. 

Primarv Adenocarcinoma of Ovary. Died 
1/17/64 of Small Bowel Obstruction. 

M.M. UH-27-06-54, 59 yr. old W.F. ad. 1/17/64 R.S. 

Carcinoma of Cervix. Died 2/5/64 of 
Congestive Heart Failure. 

M.T. UH-21-74-84, 64 yr. old C.F. ad. 2/3/64 L.J. 

Carcinoma of Cervix. Died 2/15/64 of 
Carcinomatosis. 

L.B. UH-27-25-23, 52 yr. old C.F. ad. 2/7/64 F.R. 

Carcinoma of Cervix. Died 2/22/64 of 
Atelectasis, right and Pneumonitis, left. 

A.N. LTH-16-88-63, 50 yr. old C.F. ad. 6/26/64 
Hydronephrosis. Died 8/1/64 of Chronic 
Hydronephrosis. 



UH-13-45-14, 33 yr. old C.F. ad. 8,'28/64 
Carcinoma of Cervix. Died same day of 
Bronchial Pneumonia. 

UH-26-63-60, 54 yr. old W.F. ad. 8/28/64 
Carcinoma of Cervix. Died 9/24/64 of 
Carcinomatosis. 

LTI-29-75-35, 72 yr. old C.F. ad. 9/15/64 
Cystadenocarcinoma-serous. Died 9/28/ 
64 of LTremia and Intestinal Obstruction. 

I,TH-30-00-70, 55 yr. old C.F. ad. 11/7/64 
Adenocarcinoma of Uterus. Died 11/12/ 
64 of Acute Heart Failure. 



Vol 51. No. 2 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



President's Letter 



MEDICAL 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers 1963-66 

C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 

President 
Howard B. Mays, M.D. 

President-elect 
Lewis Klair Woodward. M.D. 

Vice-President 
John A. Moran, M.D. 

rice-President 
Morris Nicholson. M.D. 

rice-President 
Walter E. Karfgin, M.D. 

Treasurer 
Theodore Kardash, M.D. 

Secretary 

William H. Triplett, M.D. 

E.reciitive Director 
Mrs. Louise Girkin 

Executive Secretary 

Board of Directors 
William J. Supik, M.D. 
Hugh B. McNallv, M.D. 
Emmanuel A. Schimunek, M.D. 
William H. Kammer, Jr., M.D. 
Robert B. Goldstein, M.D. 
John D. Young, Jr., M.D. 
Harry C. Bowie, M.D. 
John O. Sharrett, M.D. 
Theodore E. Stacy, M.D. 

Secretary 
Gibson J. Wells, M.D. 

ex-officio 
J. Howard Franz, M.D. 

ex-officio 



No 



nating: Committee 



J. Howard Franz, M.D. 
Emmanuel Schimunek. M.D. 

WiLFORD ToWNSHEND, Jr., M.D. 

Donald H. Dembo, M.D. 



C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 
ez-officio 

E. I. CORNBROOKS, M.D. 

William H. Triplett, M.D. 

Representatives to 

Editorial Board. BULLETIN 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 
John F. Savage, M.D. 
Arthur G. Siwinski, M.D. 
C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 



Representatives to 
Faculty Board (3 year term) 
C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 
Howard B. Mays, M.D. 



Fellow Medical Alumni: 

This letter for the April Bulletin would normally 
have been sent to the editor in February, in an eflort 
to let the Alumni Association members know our plans 
for the annual reunion on the weekend of May 5-6-7, 
1966. 

Unfortunately, the January, 1966, issue of the Bul- 
letin with the Presidential Letter telling of our pre- 
liminary efTorts to plan a good Alumni Day for your 
returning members did not come off the press in time 
to be sent out before the Alumni Day activities. Instead 
of your receiving it in January, it has not appeared as 
of the last week of May. The delay was occasioned by 
a consecutive series of unfortunate delays which the 
editor assures us will not recur. I understand that the 
April issue is now on press and will appear in June. 
The July issue will mark the return of the Bulletin to 
a regular schedule. There are several things that I 
think are important for the Alumni to know. 

One is that the President of the Alumni Association 
and the Board of Directors of the Alumni Association 
collaborate with the Bulletin in its publication but do 
not assume the responsibility for printing it. It is our 
aim to cooperate with the editor and his staff and to 
offer all of the help the Alumni office can give. Next, it 
should be pointed out to the Alumni that the annual 
dues of the Medical Alumni Association is $7.00. A 
subscription to the Bulletin (4 issues) amounts to 
$3.00. The type of bill sent to each alumnus is a type 
approved by the postal authorities. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation collects the subscription funds and remits them 
to the Bulletin. 

There have been criticisms of the Bulletin. There 
has been praise for the Bulletin. There have been criti- 
cisms for the Annual Alumni meeting. There have 
been criticisms of many things in-so-far as the Alumni 
Association is concerned. There are always those who 
criticize. There also has been much praise. I have 
Continued on page xxxii 

April. 1966 xxxi 



BVLLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. UXIJ-ERSITV OF MARVLAXD 
PRESIDENT'S LETTER (Cont.) 



1 



heard two criticisms of the Alumni Day activities and have heard hundreds of laud- 
atory remarks. I feel that if those who have justifiable criticism would come to the 
Alumni meetings and help make the necessary decisions at the annual business meet- 
ing, it would not then be necessary for them to write in letters of criticism after 
decisions have been made. Out of the thousands of Alumni, less than one hundred 
turned out for the annual business meeting this year. I do feel that a keener interest 
on the part of all Alumni is necessary for a smoothly functioning organization. 



C. PARKE SC.'\RBOROUGH, M.D. 

President 



Pay Your Medical Alumni Dues 
Directly to School of 3Medicine 

In recent months, confusion has arisen concerning the 
j)lace where physicians who wish to pay their Ahinmi dues 
may send their check. The following will serve to clarify this 
issue. 

There are two Alumni Associations at the University of 
Maryland. There is the General Alumni Association with 
offices at College Park. Of particular interest to the School 
of [Medicine, is the Medical Ahmmi Association with offices 
at Lombard and Greene Streets in Davidge Hall. 

Physicians who are graduates of the School of INIedicine 
are urged to maintain their active association and affiliation 
Mith their Alnia Mater through the payment of their annual 
dues for which bills are sent at the end of each school year 
(June). Those Alvimni who are interested in the General 
Alumni Association at College Park should seek membership 
through this organization, the offices of which are at College 
Park. All scientific sessions, alumni news and the Bvilletin of 
the School of Medicine comprise the activities of the [Medical 
Akimni Association. A magazine Maryland is the publication 
of the General Alumni Association. 



Vol. 51, Xo. ^ 



Class 



NOTES 



Elsewhere in this edition you will 
find a "tear out" page, for reporting 
Alumni News to the Bulletin. This is 
not an idle gesture. 

Your achievements, fellow alumnus, 
are of interest to your classmates. They 
constitute a reward to the faculty, are a 
challenge to the younger physicians, and 
are an item of prestige for the Univer- 
sity. Please cooperate with us by for- 
zvarding news of yourself or any alumnus 
to the Bulletin. Thank you. 

P & S 1903 

Dr. F. W. Mayer of 1830 James Avenue, 
St. Paul, Minnesota, writes: "The October 
1965 edition of the Bulletin is worthwhile 
keeping as it goes back a few centuries in 
medical education in the United States. 

"As an old timer, I send you a check to 
help the good cause. Not many members 
of the P & S class of 1903 are around any 
more and I wonder if Dr. Ale.xius McGlan- 
nan is still among the living. He was one 
of my most esteemed teachers not in a 
surgical subject but mostly physiologic 
chemistry and clinical laboratory." (Dr. 
Mayer enclosed a contribution toward the 
publication of the Bulletin.) (Dr. Alexius 
McGlannan died on February 25, 1940 at 
the age of 67 — Editor.) 

CL.\SS OF 1914 

Dr. Theodore M. Davis, eminent urologist 
and recipient of the 1965 Alumni Honor 
Award and Gold Key, has been nominated 
Valentine lecturer by the urological section 
of the New York Academy of Medicine. 
Dr. Davis will present a paper entitled "Ex- 
periences in Transurethral Resections" il- 
lustrated with motion pictures of his origi- 
nal work in the development of this tech- 
nique. The award, presented annually 
carries a considerable honorarium, a medal 
and a plaque with it. 



CLASS OF 1925 

Dr. Samuel C. Glick, associate professor 
of pediatrics, has been elected vice-president 
of the National Board of Trustees of the 
Phi Delia Epsilon Fraternity. 

Dr. Thomas B. Turner, dean of the school 
of medicine of the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, has been recently elected president 
of the Association of American Medical 
Colleges. 

CLASS OF 1928 

Dr. Israel Kaufman, for a number of years 
head of the New York City Department of 
Health, Division of Tuberculosis and for 
the past 20 years physician-in-charge of 
the chest clinic, will shortly retire from the 
Department of Hospitals and the University 
of the State of New York. Dr. Kaufman 
has been a member of the faculty of the 
university for the past ten years serving as 
assistant professor of clinical medicine. He 
was formerly associated with Kingston Ave- 
nue Hospital where he served as attending 
physician and director of pulmonary dis- 
ease. Following the closing of that insti- 
tution he became connected with the Kings 
County Hospital Center as an attending 
physician, serving as president of its medical 
board for three years. Dr. Kaufman will 
continue in the private practice of internal 
medicine, specializing in diseases of the 
chest. 

CLASS OF 1929 

Dr. Jacob H. Conn, assistant professor of 
psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University 
School of Medicine, was recently elected 
president of the American Board of Medical 
Hypnosis at its 17th Annual Meeting held 
in Los Angeles, California. Dr. Conn is also 
a past president of the society and recipient 
of the society's 1965 Schneck Award for 
significant contributions to the development 
of medical hypnosis. He was the first private 
practicing psychiatrist in Maryland to be 
certified by the American Board of Psy- 
chiatry and later by the Neurology Board in 
1959. 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CLASS OF 1934 

Dr. Louis V. Blum has been elected presi- 
dent of the HIAS, the Jewish Welfare Fund's 
migration service agency. Dr. Blum suc- 
ceeded Paul L. Cordish who has retired. 

Dr. Ralph B. Garrison currently serves as 
chairman of the board of school trustees of 
Hamlet, North Carolina. After his gradu- 
ation, he served as a junior resident at the 
Maryland House of Correction and an in- 
ternship at the Baltimore City Hospital. 
Dr. Garrison helped organize the Hamlet 
civic club, the community's first organiza- 
tion of that type, and was its second presi- 
dent. Dr. Garrison is also active in a num- 
ber of other civic and governmental 
organizations. 

CLASS OF 1935 

Dr. George F. Schmitt, F.A.C.P., is the 
author of a recently published popular 
book entitled Diabetes for Diabetics. 

CLASS OF 1936 

Dr. W. Kenneth Mansfield, obstetrician and 
gynecologist, has been recently elected head 
of the medical staff of the Franklin Square 
Hospital. 

CLASS OF 1937 

Dr. Everett S. Diggs has announced the 
relocation of his office for the practice of 
gynecology and female urology to the 
Greater Baltimore Medical Center, 6701 
North Charles street, Baltimore. Several 
years ago, Dr. Diggs was named head of 
the department of gynecology at the then 
Women's Hospital of Maryland which has 
been reorganized as a large North Balti- 
more General Hospital in new quarters 
erected on the former grounds of the 
Sheppard Pratt Hospital, land purchased 
for this purpose of constructing a large gen- 
eral hospital to serve this section of the 
growing metropolitan area. 



CLASS OF 1938 

Dr. John Z. Bowers, president of the 
Josiah Macy Junior Foundation of New 
York City, presented the annual Beaumont 
Memorial Lecture at Yale University School 
of Medicine on January 28, 1966. Dr. 
Bowers' subject was "From Chinese Medi- 
cine to Western Medicine in Japan." Dr. 
Bowers is a recent author of a volume re- 
lating to a study of Japanese medicine, the 
outcome of more than two years work in 
the Orient. 

Dr. Joseph M. George, Jr. of 637 East 
Sahara avenue, Las Vegas, Nevada, has 
been elected president of the Nevada State 
Medical Association for the year 1965-66. 

Dr. Edward Siegel of 44 Broad street, 
Plattsburgh, N. Y., has been re-elected as 
chief of staff of the Physician's Hospital, 
Plattsburgh, N. Y. 

CLASS OF 1940 

Dr. Lester Caplan has been named chief 
of pediatrics of the North Charles General 
Hospital. Dr. Caplan also served on the 
Executive Committee and the National 
Board of Trustees of the Phi Delta Epsilon 
Medical Fraternity. 

Dr. William R. Piatt, pathologist and head 
of the department of pathology at the 
Missouri Baptist Hospital in St. Louis, is 
the editor of the section "New and Useful 
Technics" published in the Bulletin of Path- 
ology of the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists. Dr. Piatt is the author of 
numerous scientific papers including a 
widely used publication on cells of spinal 
fluid and brain cysts. 

CLASS OF 1941 

Dr. Kenneth L. Zierler is a member of 
the Editorial Board of the Bulletin of the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Dr. Frank Mason Sones, Jr., Director, de- 
partment of pediatric cardiology and cardiac 



Vol. 51, No. ? 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



laboratory of the Cleveland Clinic Founda- 
tion, was a recent recipient of one of the 
Modern Medicine awards for 1965. 

CLASS OF 1944 

Dr. Abraham Lilienfeld, a member of the 
faculty of the Johns Hopkins University, 
has been named a member of the newly 
organized international agency for cancer 
research. Dr. Lilienfeld was selected among 
scientists from seven countries including the 
United States which he will represent as 
a member of the advisory council. The 
organization is designed not to perform re- 
search on its own but makes grants for 
projects, toward which its seven members 
contribute. The agency secretariat is headed 
by the director-general of the World Health 
Organization. 

CLASS OF 1946 

Dr. Jerome D. Nataro, Bluegrass lane, 
Levittown. N. Y. has been recently certi- 
fied by the American Board of Otolaryng- 
ology. 

CLASS OF 1947 

Dr. Pascal D. Spino of Greensburg, N. C. 
is currently serving as a volunteer on the 
S. S. Hope. The ship this year will spend 
a period of time in Nicaragua where Dr. 
Spino will be joined by specialists in every 
field of medicine. Dr. Spino has prepared 
a series of lectures to be presented to medical 
personnel in the Central American nation. 
Thanks to the efforts of a friend of his, 
Mrs. Antonio Rebolledo of Greensburg, Dr. 
Spino's lectures have been translated into 
Spanish. 

CLASS OF 1948 

Dr. Donald I. Mohler, Jr., of 975 Ryland 
Street, Reno, Nevada, has been elected 
Chief of Staff of the Washoe Medical Center 
in Reno. Dr. Mohler also serves as Chief 
of the Department of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology of the same hospital. 



CLASS OF 1952 

Dr. Norton Spritz of 445 East 68th street, 
New York City, has been appointed as- 
sociate professor of medicine at the Cornell 
Medical College where Dr. Spritz will direct 
the Lipid Metabolism Laboratory of the Cor- 
nell Medical Division at Bellevue Hospital. 
Dr. Spritz assumed this new position on 
July 1, 1965. 

CLASS OF 1953 

Dr. Leonard B. Click of the University 
of Pennsylvania has been appointed assistant 
professor of anthropology at the University 
of Wisconsin, at Madison, Wisconsin. 

Dr. Joseph E. Shuman of the 1400 South 
Joyce street (Suite A 102), Arlington, Vir- 
ginia, has recently been certified as a diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Internal 
Medicine. 

CLASS OF 1956 

Dr. Harold L Rodman of 1110 Spring 
street, Silver Spring, Md. has been recently 
certified a diplomate of the American Board 
of Ophthalmology. 

CLASS OF 1956 

Dr. George T. Smith serves as Research 
Professor of Pathology at the Desert Re- 
search Institute of the University of Nevada. 
Dr. Smith resides at 3293 Gypsum Road, 
Reno, Nevada. 

CLASS OF 1959 

Dr. Robert S. Holt, who holds the position 
of captain in the United States Air Force, 
recently participated in a series of pro- 
grams on the latest advancement in the 
medical aspects of aviation and space travel. 
Dr. Holt, who has served in Vietnam, is 
currently on duty as a resident neurosurgeon 
at the University Hospital in Baltimore. 



April. 1966 



Beatfjsi 



CLASS OF 1902 

Dr. Ernest Charles Lehnert of 3003 North 
Charles Street, died October 25, 1965 at 
the age of 85 

CLASS OF 1904 

Dr. Robert Emmett Houston died on 
October 4, 1965 at his home, 411 East 
Washington street, Greenville, S. C. Dr. 
Houston, who had been retired a number 
of years, was 87. 

A native of Greenville, he was graduated 
first from the University of Maryland School 
of Pharmacy and later from the School of 
Medicine. He immediately returned to 
Greenville, later entering the specialty of 
ophthalmology. 

CLASS OF 1905 

Dr. Archibald Wright Graham, of Box 563, 
Chisholm, Minnesota, died October 18, 
1965. 

P & S 1905 

Dr. William C. Stone, who served as health 
officer in Carroll and Howard Counties for 
more than sixty years, died on October 6, 
1965. Dr. Stone was 85. Since 1924 he 
had lived in Westminster with his home and 
private medical oflBces at 121 East Green 
street. He left the State health post in 
1951 but had maintained an active practice 
until his health failed early in 1965. He 
was a native of Vermont and came to 
study medicine at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, now a part of the University 
of Maryland School of Medicine. He served 
his internship at the St. Agnes Hospital, later 
serving in the same hospital as an assistant 
resident in medicine. 

Dr. Clyde W. Vick of 21 17 Jefferson Street, 
Bluefield, West Virginia, died on December 
4, 1965 at the age of 87. 



CLASS OF 1906 

Dr. Orel Nathan Chaffee of 820 Sassafras 
street, Erie, Pennsylvania, died August 30, 
1965 at the age of 89. 

CLASS OF 1908 

Dr. Charles William Cohn of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, died on August 15, 1965. Dr. 
Cohn was 79. 

CLASS OF 1910 

Dr. Thomas Dalton Crouch of Box 97, 

Stony Point, N. C, died on August 8, 1965 
at the age of 87. 

Dr. Harry R. Seelinger of 8920 Semmes 
avenue, Norfolk, Virginia, died May 2, 1965 
at the age of 76. 

Dr. Joseph Righton Robertson of 1968 
Johns Road, Augusta, Georgia, died on 
February 5, 1966. 

CLASS OF 1911 

Dr. Abraham Hornstein of 204 East Biddle 
street, Baltimore, Md., died June 11, 1965. 
Dr. Hornstein was 77. 

P & S 1911 

Dr. Hermon Simons Miller of 609 Wash- 
ington street, Wilmington, Delaware died 
on August 21, 1965 at the age of 76. 

CLASS OF 1912 

Dr. Silvia Jeremiah Roberts of 1432 
North Second street, Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, died August 20, 1965 at the age of 
80. 

P & S 1912 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein of 3505 North 
Charles Street, Baltimore, died on February 
22, 1966. 

Dr. Goldstein, an internationally promi- 
nent urologist, long active in the affairs of 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



ALUMXl ASSOCIATION SECTION 



the School of Medicine and of the Uni- 
versity as a whole, was honored by many 
friends prior to his death, after a lingering 
illness. Dr. Goldstein's obituary will ap- 
pear in a forthcoming edition of the Bulletin. 

CLASS OF 1913 

Dr. Samuel Allen Alexander of 1830 Eye 
street in Washington, D. C, died on Septem- 
ber 22, 1965. Dr. Alexander was 73. 

Dr. William Walter Sirak of 1015 Car- 
negie avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, died July 
20, 1965 at the age of 74. 

CLASS OF 1914 

Dr. George W. Bishop of Pasadena, Mary- 
land, died on July 6, 1965. Dr. Bishop was 

77. 

P & S 1914 

Dr. Byron W. Steele of Mullens, West Vir- 
ginia, died on January 29, 1966. A native 
of Moundsville, West Virginia, Dr. Steele 
was actively engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine when he was stricken early in Novem- 
ber of 1965. 

Dr. Steele received his Bacheloriate De- 
gree from Marshall University in 1910 and 
following his graduation was commissioned 
a First Lieutenant in the Army Medical 
Corps. He served in World War I in field 
hospitals in France. He then returned to 
Mullens, West Virginia where he remained 
as a practitioner until his death. 

CLASS OF 1915 

Dr. Vincent J. Demarco, of 1642 Poplar 
avenue, Memphis Tennessee, died October 
27, 1965. Dr. Demarco was 73. 



CLASS OF 1917 

Dr. Clarence Mansfield Reddig (Col., 
Medical Corps, U. S. A.) retired, of 3 Red 
Cross avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, died 
April 24, 1965. Dr. Reddig was 72. 



CLASS OF 1918 

Dr. Clarence E. Macke of Ellicott City, 
Maryland, died on January 15, 1966. 

A native and life long resident of Balti- 
more, Dr. Macke practiced pediatrics until 
his retirement in 1957. He worked closely 
with the Bureau of Recreation throughout 
his life and was a member of the Lutheran 
church. 

Dr. Irwin O. Ridgely, of 202 Edgevale 
road in Baltimore, died on December 28, 
1965. Dr. Ridgely was 73. 

Dr. Ridgely was a native of Bartholows, 
Frederick county and was graduated from 
the Frederick County School and from 
Washington College. Following his gradu- 
ation from the University of Maryland, 
he interned and later took postgraduate 
courses in surgery at the Mercy Hospital 
becoming ultimately an associate surgeon 
at both the Mercy and the University 
Hospitals. Dr. Ridgely, for many years as- 
sociated with Drs. Henry F. Bongardt and 
Patrick C. Phelan, specialized in industrial 
surgery. He was a member of the Balti- 
more City Medical Society, the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, the 
American Medical Association and the 
Southern Medical Association. He also was 
a Fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons. 



CLASS OF 1916 

Dr. Foster A. Beck, 323 North 7th street, 
AUentown, Pennsylvania, died September 
27, 1965. 

Dr. Thomas M. Dominguez-Rubio, of 1 

Baldorioty Street, Guayama, Puerto Rico, 
died October 24, 1963. 



Dr. James Parks Rousseau of 808 Oak- 
lawn avenue, Winston-Salem, North Caro- 
lina, died September 29, 1965. Dr. Rous- 
seau was 69. 

Dr. Frank Sabiston of P.O. Box 530, 
Kinston, North Carolina, died on June 17, 
1965 at the age of 72. 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



CLASS OF 1920 

Dr. Nathan J. Davidov of 3218 Eastern 
avenue, Baltimore, Md. died on November 
25, 1965. 

Dr. James William Skaggs of Nitro, West 
Virginia, died July 19, 1965 at the age of 68. 

CLASS OF 1921 

Dr. Harold C. Pillsbury, Sr. of 1800 North 
Charles street, died on January 12, 1966. 
Dr. Pillsbury was 67. 

Dr. Pillsbury practiced both general and 
industrial surgery and was active on the 
staff of the St. Joseph's Hospital in Balti- 
more, the institution where he received his 
surgical training. 

CLASS OF 1922 

Dr. Lewis J. Doshay of 710 West 168th 
street, New York, died recently. 

CLASS OF 1924 

Dr. Jerome F. Granofif of 37-12 75th 
Street, Jackson Heights, New York, died 
November 8, 1965. Dr. Granoff was 64. 

CLASS OF 1925 

Dr. Leo T. Brown of 1621 New Hampshire 
avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C, died on 
January 14, 1966. 

Dr. William Earl Lennon of 122 West 
Central avenue, Federalsburg, Maryland, 
died on December 31, 1965. Dr. Lennon 
was 67. 

A native of Manteo, North Carolina and 
a graduate of the University of North Caro- 
lina, Dr. Lennon was engaged in general 
practice in Federalsburg since 1926. 

CLASS OF 1926 

Dr. Paul Eanet, a surgeon who received 
a congressional citation for his work with 
Selective Service System during World War 
II, died in Washington, D. C. on September 
25, 1965, at the age of 62. Dr. Eanet served 
on the staffs of several hospitals in the 
District of Columbia. 



CLASS OF 1927 

Dr. T. Nelson Carey, Professor of Clinical 
Medicine at the University of Maryland and 
who was to receive the 1966 Alumni An- 
nual Honor Award and Gold Key, died at 
Mercy Hospital on March 11, 1966 after 
a short illness. Dr. Carey's obituary will 
appear in a forthcoming edition of the 
Bulletin. 

CLASS OF 1928 

Dr. William H. Varney of 120 Belvedere 
avenue, Washington, New Jersey, died on 
January 10, 1966. Dr. Varney was 61. 

He began practice in Washington, New 
Jersey shortly after his graduation from the 
School of Medicine and his internship at the 
University Hospital. Dr. Varney was a 
member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, the International College of Surgeons, 
the Warren County (New Jersey) Health 
Board and was executive secretary of the 
Warren County Division of the American 
Cancer Society. He also served as a director 
of the Warren County Tuberculosis and 
Health Association. 

CLASS OF 1929 

Dr. Phillip P. (Paul) Cohen of 104 South 
Church street. Snow Hill, Maryland, died 
November 26, 1965. 

CLASS OF 1931 

Dr. H. Vernon Langluttig, formally a mem- 
ber of the staff of the University Hospital 
and at one time head of the chest division 
of the Baltimore City Hospitals, died on 
February 1, 1966 in Mt. Vernon, Missouri. 
Dr. Langluttig was 61. 

A native of Baltimore and an alumnus 
of the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, Dr. 
Langluttig received his Bacheloriate Degree 
from the Johns Hopkins University. Follow- 
ing his graduation from the School of Medi- 
cine he interned at St. Joseph's Hospital 
and served a residency in medicine at the 
University Hospital. He later became active 
on the teaching faculty rising to the rank 
of clinical professor of medicine. In 1942 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



AI.UMXI ASSOCIATIOX SECTION 



he volunteered for military service and spent 
two years in the Fiji Islands. In 1957. he 
returned to the City Hospitals where he 
served as Chief until accepting a post of 
Chief of the Service of the Missouri Chest 
Center in Mount Vernon, Missouri. 

CLASS OF 1934 

Dr. Charles L. Goodhand of 1100 Market 
street, Parkersburg, West Virginia, died Sep- 
tember 10, 1965 at the age of 58. 

I Dr. Milton Levin died on November 16, 
1965 at the Lutheran Hospital of Maryland. 

IT WAS my good fortune <o have known 
Dr. Milton Levin since his student days. 
He was graduated from the University of 
Maryland in 1934. He did his internship 
at Lutheran Hospital, which at that time 
was known as West Baltimore General. He 
served three years as a house officer, com- 
pleting his residency in surgery in 1938. 
This was followed by post-graduate work at 
the Philadelphia General Hospital. He was 
always a good student and made every 
effort to be informed of the latest advances 
in medicine. His professional life was dedi- 
cated to the practice of clinical surgery. To 
this he gave his whole being and unstintingly 
to his patients. He was never content with 
less than the best for his patients. The im- 
pressive qualities of Dr. Levin were his 
kindliness and humility. He was ever the 
solicitous servant to his patients. In ad- 
dition to his feeling of professional re- 
sponsibility he evidenced a personal concern 
for the overall welfare of his patients. This 
T can state from personal experience of his 
art and craft. In addition, he was interested 
in the administrative side of his profession. 
It was in this facet of medicine that he 
willingly devoted himself generously. In his 
executive positions he was guided by a 
sense of fairness and balance that was re- 
freshing. WTien the occasion required, he 
could exhibit firmness and courage for the 
position he thought right. He practiced 
medicine as Job practiced his religion with 
the material reward being of the least con- 
cern. Truly he was a real image of the good 
doctor. His personal religion was to be 



"his brother's keeper." He was a devoted 
husband and father of two sons. His con- 
cern for his home could be best understood 
when he said at the time of his final stay 
at the hospital that he didn't think he'd 
see his home again. 

His practice of surgery was limited en- 
tirely to the Lutheran Hospital. Truly it 
can be said that he personified the image 
of a "Good Shepherd." His passing will 
be a loss deeply felt by his loved ones, 
friends and patients. 

Louis A. M. Krause, M.D. 

CLASS OF 1937 

Dr. Mitchell F. Kunkowski of 2529 
Eastern avenue died on December 25, 1965 
at the age of 53. 

A native of Baltimore and an alumnus of 
Lions College High School in Pennsylvania, 
Dr. Kunkowski later attended the University 
of Maryland and following his graduation 
from the School of Medicine served actively 
with the United States Army in World War 
II. He served his internship at the St. 
Joseph's Hospital and later studied internal 
medicine and served a residency at the 
Maryland General Hospital. 

CLASS OF 1943 

Dr. Joseph F. McMullin of 127 E. Edge- 
wood drive, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, died 
on August 19, 1965 at the age of 49. Death 
was due to drowning. 

Dr. E. Thornton Pfeil, Jr., died on August 
20, 1965 at the age of 45. Death was caused 
by leukemia. 

Dr. Pfeil, who lived at 2021 North Central 
Avenue in Phoenix, Arizona, was a native of 
Baltimore and received the Bachelor of 
Science degree from the University of Mary- 
land and later his Doctor of Medicine de- 
gree from the same school graduating Cum 
Laude in the class of 1943. 

Following an internship at the University 
Hospital, he completed his residency in 
neurosurgery under the joint directorship of 
Dr. Charles Bagly, Jr. and James G. Arnold. 



April, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



For a period of time, Dr. Pfeil served as 
fellow in neuropathology. Upon completion 
of his residency, he was commisisoned in 
the Army of the United States attaining a 
rank of major. During his military service 
at the Letterman General Hospital and later 
he held the position of chief of neurosurgery 
at the Brooke Army Medical Center, San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Dr. Pfeil was a member of many pro- 
fessional societies including the state and 
country societies, the American Medical 
Association, the Harvey Gushing Society, the 
American College of Surgeons, the American 
Board of Neurological Surgeons and the 
Congress of Neurological Surgeons includ- 
ing the Gold Headed Cane Club. Dr. Pfeil 
came to Phoenix in 1953 and was first as- 
sociated with Dr. John Eisenbeiss and later 
with Dr. George Hoffman. He served as 
chief of neurosurgery at the Memorial 
and the Maricopa County General Hospitals 
and had staff membership in the St. Joseph's 
Hospital, Good Samaritan Hospital, St. 
Luke's, Lincoln, Mesa Southside and 
Doctors Hospital. 



In a tribute to Dr. Pfeil published in the 
November 1965 Arizona Medicine, it is 
stated "Thorny had the gallantry of a knight, 
the persuasiveness of Cervantes, and the 
ebullience of the music man. Others re- 
member him for his sportsmanship, some for 
his clubmanship and perhaps all of us for 
his professional activities, many and varied. 

"If Harvey Cushing and his contempor- 
aries are considered the founders of modern 
neurological surgery in this country, then 
Dr. Pfeil and his contemporaries would 
perhaps fall into the third generation there- 
after. It is this group of neurosurgeons, with 
angiography and other similar procedures, 
who have had increased exposure to roentgen 
irradiation." 

Not only was Dr. Pfeil an excellent and 
respected clinical surgeon but he had con- 
tributed abundantly to the scientific litera- 
ture as well. A meticulous and precise tech- 
nician, the practice of neurosurgery has in- 
deed lost a most honored and valued mem- 
ber. 

Dr. Pfeil is survived by his wife Virginia, 
a son, Edgar, and a daughter, Carolyn. 



Vol. 51, No. 2 



BULLETIN School of Medicine 
UniversU/j of Manj/oj/d 

\OHMl-: SI jlL^' IVW. MMBIK i 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



ORIGINAL ARTICLES 

Frequency and Power Considerations in the Use of 

Alternating Current Defibrillators - — 

C. D. Ferris. D.Sc. T. W. Moore, M.S., R. A. Cowley, M.D. 



Tolnoftote, A Specific Antifungal Agent. 
Harrx M. Rohiiison. Jr.. M.D. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 

Dean's Letter —. _. 

Rolph P. Truitt, 1886-1966- __ 

Faculty Notes — - - 



Publications of Staff of School of Medicine 1964-1965. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 











xliii 










xlv 


Camera Views 


















xlviii 


Treasurer's Report of Alumni 
Pre-Commencemenf and Dean' 


Association 


196A 




li 






lii 


Camera Views 








liii 


Class of 1966 Internships . 










July, 1966 








35 



Frequency and Power Considerations in the 
Use of Alternating Current Defibrillators 

C. D. FERRIS, D.Sc, T. W. MOORE, M.S., R. A. COWLEY, M.D. 



Introduction 

Most investigations of the role of 
frequency in successful defibrillation at- 
tempts have merely compared 60 cps. 
alternating current with direct cur- 
rent.'^' 2) The purpose of the research 
reported in this paper was to study the 
effect of frequency in general with respect 
to closed chest defibrillation. A series 
of experiments was carried out using 36 
dogs and involving nearly 500 attempts 
at defibrillation. Disc electrodes measur- 
ing 7.5 cm. in diameter were placed on 
each side of the chest of the animals. 

Defibrillation by electric shock is 
thought to be the result of complete tetanic 
contraction of all cardiac muscle fibers in 
response to a large shock. This is fol- 
lowed by a period of cardiac standstill 
and then by recovery of normal heart 
action, although in some cases an elec- 
tronic pacemaker must be used to re- 
store normal sinus rhythm. Since the 
achievement of an action potential 
ultimately depends upon the reduction of 
the charge dilTerential across a membrane, 
it would seem that the magnitude and 
duration of the current applied at the 
membrane should be the most significant 
factors at any given frequency. (^' '*'> 



Experimenters who use direct current 
defibrillation methods *-' -^' measure 
energy expended rather than current, 
probably because the decaying nature of 
the current waveform prohibits the use 
of a convenient numerical value for the 
current amplitude. From our analysis of 
the data obtained with ac defibrillators 
and from an examination of the literature 
pertaining to dc defibrillators, we feel that 
total energy expended per se is not the 
determining factor for effective defibrilla- 
tion. Energy expended as a function of 
time may show correlation with effective 
defibrillation. Measurement of expended 
energy introduces many artifacts such as 
variable electrode contact resistance and 
electrode polarization which may vary 
widely over a series of measurements. 
As a result of electrode polarization, there 
is a voltage drop at the electrode-electro- 
lyte interface when current is drawn. 
Thus the voltage appHed across the defi- 
brillation electrodes measured at the elec- 
trodes is not the voltage applied across 
the chest of the animal. ''■ '■' For these 
reasons, the decision was made to use cur- 
rent magnitude as an independent vari- 
able, since this may be measured easily, 
and to work with a fixed defibrillation 
pulse duration of 0. 1 sec. 



From the Department of Electrical Engineering, Col- 
lege Park and Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department 
of Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 
Baltimore, Maryland. Supported in part by U. S. Public 
Health Service Grant No. HE-04595. 



Results 



The data were analyzed by the follow- 
ing technique: The experimental points 



36 



rr.RRIS. MOOKF.. COtn.i:)—.tLTERN.lTL\G CVRRKXT DEFIBRILLATOKS 



(current reading as a function of 
frequency and success or failure of de- 
tibriilatory shock) were separated into 
five frequency ranges — below 80 cycles/ 
second, 80-100 cps., 100-200 cps., 200- 
250 cps., 250-300 cps. For each range 
of frequencies, the percentage of success- 
ful delibrillation attempts at various cur- 
rent amplitude levels was calculated. 
Equal numbers of tests were made in 
each frequency range so that curves 
plotted from the data would have equal 
reliability over their extents. From these 
curves, the current levels which indicated 
60% and 80% probability of suc- 
cessful defibrillation were determined. 
From these points, curves were then 
plotted showing current as a function of 
frequency for 60% and 80% confi- 
dence of successful defibrillation. These 
curves (Figs. 1 and 2) indicate that as 
frequency of the defibrillating signal is 
increased, increased current is required. 

Lown and his co-workers'" in 1962, 
using various capacitor discharge circuits, 
found that a 70 joule discharge gave 
65% reliability of defibrillation. Bala- 
got <''' reported good results with a dc 
defibrillator which supplied 80 joules into 
a 100 ohm resistive load. The results of 
our experiments, when extrapolated to 
zero frequency, are in close agreement 
with the values reported in the literature. 
In fact, our results indicate that slightly 
lower energy levels are required when low 
frequency alternating current stimulation 
is employed. Figure 3 indicates the 
energy required for successful defibrilla- 
tion with a level of confidence of success 
with the first shock of 80%. The dur- 
ation of the defibrillatory shock in all 
cases is 0.1 second and the magnitude of 
the impedance presented to the defibrilla- 
tory electrodes varies from 50 to 100 
ohms, in part caused by the varying sizes 
of the experimental animals. 



6.0 

5.5 

5.0 ■ 

4,5 

4.0 

3.5 

3.0 



FiK. 1. Electrode current 

frequency for 80';/ confider 
of successful defibrillat 



300 FRSOUENCr (CPS) 
a function of applied 



300 FREOUENCr ICPS) 
s a function nf auplied 




SO % CONFIDENCE LEVEL 



60% CONFIDENCE LEVEL 



300 FREOUENCr ICPS) 



Julv. 1966 



37 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNU'ERSITV OF MARYLAND 



To find power levels within the body 
during the application of a defibrillatory 
shock, disc electrodes were implanted in 
several animals. The electrical power 
level at the heart during the defibrillating 
signal was measured by suturing stain- 
less-steel-wire crocheted electrodes (1.5 
cm. 2) on opposing sides of the myo- 
cardium. Connections to these electrodes 
were brought out to the skin surface of 
the animal. The animal was permitted 
to heal for six weeks. By direct measure- 
ment, the impedance presented to the 
electrodes by the heart was found to be 
approximately 900 ohms at 60 cps. It 
was found that at 60 cps. (the usual 
frequency employed by ac defibrillators), 
less than 1% of the power applied at 
the chest surface appeared at the heart. 

Appendix 

All of the experimental animals were 
anesthetized using standard Nembutal 
I.V. Repeated injections were required to 
maintain an approximately constant level 
of anesthesia as the electric shocks 
counteracted the effect of the Nembutal. 

Electrode contact problems were also 
investigated to learn their effect upon 
studies of this nature. Studies were con- 
ducted using saturated-saline-wetted elec- 
trodes applied to the skin directly, satur- 
ated-saline-soaked gauze pads between 
the electrodes and the skin surface, and 
standard electrode paste between the elec- 
trodes and the skin. Beforehand, the 
animal's skin had been prepared by shav- 
ing and cleansing with germicidal soap. 



The quality of the electrode contact was 
evaluated by measuring the impedance 
presented to the electrodes by the chest 
region of experimental animals under con- 
stant electrode pressure. 

It was found that electrode paste gave 
the most unreliable and variable results. 
The smallest variation was found with the 
saline soaked gauze pads. The saline- 
wetted electrodes gave uniform results but 
a constant contact potential drop was 
noted. Higher impedance values were 
also noted in this last case. 

References 

1. LowN, B., et al.. "Comparison of Alter- 
nating Current wtih Direct Current Electro- 
shock Across the Closed Chest," Am. J. Cardi- 
ol.. 10:223-233 (1962). 

2. Mackay, R. S. and Leeds, S. E., "Physio- 
logical Effects of Condenser Discharges," J. 
Appl. Phy.tiol., 6:67 (1953). 

3. Ferris, L. P., et al., "Effect of Electric 
Shock on the Heart." Electrical En;.;iiu'criiig 
(May, 1936). 

4. Wiggers, C. J., "The Physiological Basis 
for Cardiac Resuscitation from Ventricular Fi- 
brillation . . . Method of Serial Defibrillation," 
Am. Heart J.. 20:413 (1940). 

5. SCHWAN, H. p., "Electrodenpolarisation 
und ihr Einfluss auf die Bestimmung dielek- 
trischer Eigenschaften von Flussigkeiten und 
biologischem Material." Zeit. f. Nariir., 
6b:3:121-129, (1957). 

6. KOHLRAUSCH, F., Ann. Pliy.sik unci C hemic . 
60:315 (1897). 

7. Balagot, R. C, et al., "A Monopulse DC 
Current Defibrillator for Ventricular Fibrilla- 
tion." J. Thoracic and Cardiovas. Surg. (April. 
1964). 



38 



Vol. 51, Nc: 3 



Tolnaf'laUN A Specific Antifuiigal Agent 



HARRY M. ROBINSON, JR., M.D. 



ToLNAFTATE ( 0-2-naphth\i m, N-di- 
methylthiocarbanilate), synthesized in 
I960,"' is the first chemical compound 
to have specific fungicidal activity on 
topical application. Initial clinical studies 
proved this drug to be effective in the 
treatment of superficial mycotic infections 
due to trichophyton rubrum, trichophyton 
nientagrophytes. trichophyton tonsurans, 
epidermophyton floccosum. microsporum 
canis, microsporum gypseum. microspor- 
um audouini. and microsporum furfur.'-' 
Adverse effects to the topical applications 
of the 1.0% solution or 1.0% cream 
were not encountered in this investigation. 
Double blind studies confirmed the thera- 
peutic efficacy of the tolnaftate prepara- 
tions. In subsequent in vitro and in vivo 
studies '■'■■*' the spectrum, lack of toxicity, 
freedom from adverse reactions, and 
range of therapeutic specificity were dem- 
onstrated. 

Lesions due to Candida albicans do 
not respond to local applications of the 
tolnaftate preparations. Tinea versicolor, 
tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea cor- 
poris due to the previously mentioned 
dermatophytes respond promptly to treat- 
ment with this drug, but it is ineffective 
in onychomycosis and tinea capitis. 

Tolnaftate is a colorless, odorless com- 
pound which is soluble in most organic 
compounds and insoluble in water. It 
does not stain skin, hair or nails. The 
solution contains 1.0% tolnaftate, and 



ision of Dermatology, Department of 
sity of Maryland School of Medicine. 



0.1% butylatcd hydro.\ytoluene in poly- 
ethylene glycol 400. The cream contains 
1.0% tolnaftate in a vanishing cream 
base. 

This report contains the results of ex- 
tended clinical trials and follow-up studies. 
In all patients the diagnoses were estab- 
lished by direct microscopic examinations 
and cultures. The importance of labora- 
tory confirmation of clinical impressions 
cannot be overemphasized. 

Three hundred twenty-three patients 
who had superficial mycotic infections 
were treated with 1.0% tolnaftate solution 
or cream (chart #1). These clinical 
trials and laboratory studies were con- 
ducted in the out-patient department of 
the University of Maryland Hospital and 
the author's private practice. In vitro 
studies showed tolnaftate to be ineffective 
against Candida albicans and this finding 
was confirmed by its therapeutic inefficacy 
in the management of cutaneous lesions 
due to this organism. Twenty-five patients 
with tinea capitis due to microsporum 
audouini and five with trichophyton ton- 
surans infections of the scalp did not re- 
spond to simple topical or occlusive dress- 
ing therapy with tolnaftate solution. Nail 
involvement did not respond. Interdigital 
lesions due to trichophyton rubrum, 
trichophyton mentagrophytes, and epi- 
dermophyton floccosum cleared in 7 to 
14 days following initiation of tolnaftate 
therapy. In this type of lesion, griseo- 
fulvin is ineffective. Palmar and plantar 
lesions show a partial response to the 



July. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Tolnaftate Study 
Chart *1 



Organism 


Total 
No. 


Treate 
1% 
Cream 


i With 

1% 
Solution 


Sites 
Involved 


Results 
Good Poor 


M. Furfur 


56 


24 


32 


Trunk 56 


48 


s 


T. Rubruni 


212 


59 


153 


Hands \ 69 
Feet / 
Groins only 67 
Trunk and 
Extremities 30 
Multiple 
Sites 42 
Nails only 4 


54 

67 

30 

42 



15 palmar or 



42 nails only 

4 


plantar 


T. Mentagrophytes 


11 


2 


9 


Feet 3 
Trunk and 
Extremities 8 


11 





3M. Canis 


6 


4 


2 


Trunk, Fare 6 
Extremities 


6 





M. Audouini 


26 


1 


25 


Glabrous skin 1 
Scalp 25 


1 
25 


T. Tonsurans 


5 




5 


Glabrous skin 3 
Scalp 2 


3 






E. Floccosum 


5 


3 


2 


Trunk 2 
Groins 2 
Feet 1 


2 
2 

1 







C. Albicans 


2 




2 


Groins 2 





2 





local applications of the tolnaftate prepa- 
rations, but when the solution or cream 
was used alternately with a keratolytic 
ointment such as Whitfield's or 10% sali- 
cylic acid clearing was obtained. Ex- 
cellent results were obtained in the treat- 
ment of 48 of the 56 patients who had 
tinea versicolor. 

Trichophyton rubrum infections of the 
trunk and extremities responded to the 
topical applications of the tolnaftate prep- 
arations, regardless of the duration of the 
lesions. Interdigital eruptions due to the 
same fungus also cleared promptly. Pa- 



tients were relieved from itching in from 
24 to 72 hours. There were no instances 
of primary irritation or acquired hyper- 
sensitivity. 

Follow-up studies were performed on 
90 patients with various superficial my- 
cotic infections who had been success- 
fully treated with the tolnaftate prepara- 
tions from 4 to 26 months prior to the 
recheck examinations (chart 2). Each 
patient was examined for evidence of a 
superficial fungus infection. Direct mic- 
roscopic examinations and cultures were 
made from the previously infected sites. 



40 



Ucl. M. No. S 



ROBIXSOiW JR.—TOl.XAFTATE 



Follow-up Study 
Chart M2 







Number 








Shortest 






Who 


Longest 


Shortest 


Number 


Time 




Site 


Retained 


Observation 


Observation 


Who Had 


Before 


Organism 


Involved 


Remission 


Period 
Montlis 


Period 
Months 


Relapses 


Relapse 

Muiilhs 


T. Uulinim 


Hands 1 
Feet / 


11 


26 


4 


11 


4 




Groins 


15 


24 


6 


11 


5 




Trunk 


4 


24 


4 


3 


4 




Extremities , 














^lultiple 1 


4 


21 


5 


6 


5 




Sites / 












E. Flocco5um 


Feet 





12 





1 


12 




Trunk 


1 


24 


— 








M. Canis 


Trunk, 1 














Face I- 


3 


18 


6 





— 




Extremities- J 












T. Menta- 


Feet 


1 


12 


12 





— 


gropiiytes 


Trunk, etc. 


3 


IS 


4 





— 


M. Furfur 


Trunk 


2 


13 


4 


14 


4 



Based on Follow-up of 90 Patients 
Chart *3 







Longest Period 


Shortest Period of 


Organism 


Sites Involved 


of Remission 


Remission Without Relapse 


T. Kubrum 


Hands 
Feet 


26 Months 


4 Months 




Groins 


24 Months 


6 Months 




Trunk and 


24 Months 


4 Months 




Extremities 








Multiple Sites 


21 Months 


5 Months 


E. Floecosum 


Feet 


6 Months 


6 Months 




Trunk 


24 Months 




.M. Canis 


Trunk 

Face 

Extremities 


18 Months 





T. Mentagrophytes 



Feet 
Trunk, etc. 



12 Months 
18 Months 



Trunk 



13 Months 



4 Months 



July. 1966 



RULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. VXirERSITV OF .l/.-JAT/.J.W) 



The relapse rate, calculated on the basis 
of 90 patients, was as follows: 
Infections due to T. rubrum 47.6% 
E. floccosum 50.0% 
T. mentagrophytes 0.0 
M. canis 0.0 

M. furfur 87.5% 

The periods of remission (chart 3) be- 
fore the redevelopment of subjective or 
objective symptoms ranged from 4 to 
26 months. In every instance of relapse 
there was prompt response to retreatment 
with tolnaftate solution or cream. The 
relapse rate of cutaneous mycotic infec- 
tions successfuly treated with tolnaftate 
is approximately the same as the relapse 
rate for those treated with griseofulvin. 

Comment 

Clinical and laboratory studies have 
established the fact that tolnaftate, in 
1.0% solution or cream, is an efficient 
topical fungicidal agent which promptly 
relieves subjective symptoms and clears 
the lesions produced by the superficial 
dermatophytes. Its sole value lies in the 
treatment of mycotic infections and has 
no beneficial effect on concurrent cutan- 
eous eruptions The results of in vitro 
studies are confirmed by clinical ex- 
perience. 

The preparations of tolnaftate have 
produced no evidence of primary irrita- 
tion or acquired contact hypersensitivity. 
Animal studies revealed no evidence of 
toxicity even on systemic administration 
of exceptionally large doses. 

The tolnaftate preparations, unlike 
griseofulvin, will produce complete in- 
volution of interdigital eruptions due to 
fungi. In view of the fact that many erup- 
tions simulate mycotic infections on the 
feet, it is imperative to verify the diagnosis 
of a fungus infection by the proper la- 
boratory methods. Dyshidrosis, shoe der- 
matitis, psoriasis, and eczematous erup- 
tions are difficult to distinguish from 



fungus infections by the most experienced 
clinician. A clinical diagnosis alone is 
never sufficient justification for specific 
antifungal therapy. 

The success obtained with tolnaftate 
topical therapy eliminates the necessity 
for systemic griseofulvin therapy except 
in hair or nail infections. 

The relapse rate of patients with super- 
ficial mycotic infections successfully 
treated with tolnaftate preparations, based 
on a follow-up of 90 patients, is the same 
as that obtained with systemic griseofulvin 
treatment. Evidence of resistance to tol- 
naftate did not develop. Those patients 
who were successfully treated and sufl'ered 
relapses responded to retreatment with the 
same preparations. The 1 % solution and 
the 1% cream are equally effective. 

Summary and Conclusions 

1 . Tolnaftate in 1 % solution or cream 
applied topically is an effective antifungal 
agent in the treatment of eruptions due 
to Trichophyton rubrum. Trichophyton 
mentagrophytes. Trichophyton tonsurans. 
Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum 
canis, Microsporum gypseum. Microspor- 
um audouini and Microsporum furfur. 

2. Evidence of primary irritation or 
acquired contact sensitivity was not en- 
countered in a series of 323 patients. 

3. The preparation is ineffective in 
the treatment of eruptions due to Candida 
albicans or lesions in the scalp or nails 
due to the dermatophytes. 

4. Laboratory diagnosis is mandatory 
because the drug is ineffective in the treat- 
ment of cutaneous entities other than my- 
cotic infections. 

5. The relapse rate of tolnaftate treated 
patients approximates the rate obtained 
with griseofulvin treated patients. Evi- 
dence of resistance did not occur and pa- 
tients responded to retreatment with the 
topical compounds. 



42 



Vol. 51. Xo. 3 




MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



Dean's 



LETTER 



Dear Students, Members of the Alumni, and Friends of the Medical 
School: 

The Faculty Curriculum and Instruction Committee has been 
engaged in a continuing study of our curriculum and the quality of 
our instruction. As a part of this program about 100 faculty met 
on June 13th to 16th of this year to study the recommendations of 
the Committee for better integration of instruction and correlation of 
curriculum subjects. 

As a result of this study the faculty has decided to change the 
curriculum starting with the entering class September 1966. The 
change will consist in less emphasis on departmental teaching and 
the utilization of faculty committees representing various departments 
to present an integrated teaching of the subject involved. For ex- 
ample, Neuro-anatomy will be presented from the structure and 
functional basis by a team of faculty representing Neuro-anatomy, 
Neuro-chemistry, Neuro-physiology, Neurology, Neuro-pathology and 
Clinical Pathology. 

This method of teaching should result in a more thorough and 
stimulating program of instruction with less duplication of the sub- 
jects presented. 



Sincerely, 



William S. Stone, M.D. 
Dean 



Julv, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNU'ERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1886=1966 

Dr. Ralph P. Truitt, former Professor of 
Psychiatry in the School of Medicine, died 
June 23, 1966. Dr. Truitt was 80. 

A former executive secretary of the 
Mental Hygiene Society of Maryland, he 
headed the Community Fund Agency, a 
national organization aimed to help the 
mentally ill, particularly children. Dr. Truitt 
was not only responsible for an emphasis on 
psychiatric help for children and jail in- 
mates, but also played a large part in 
advancing psychiatry as a distinct medical 
field. It was while he was active on Faculty 
of the School of Medicine that Dr. Truitt 
initiated the idea of a psychiatric institute 
and laid the basic groundwork for its de- 
velopment. Indeed, it is quite likely that 
the institute would have developed under 
his personal supervision had not World War 
II interfered with its progress. 

A native Eastern Shoreman, Dr. Truitt 
was born in Snow Hill, Maryland, and was 
graduated from Washington College in 
Chestertown prior to his entering the School 
of Medicine at the University of Maryland 
from which he graduated in the Class of 
1910. After an internship at the University 
Hospital, he served as junior assistant 
physician at the New Jersey State Hospital 
in Trenton. In 1912, he returned to Balti- 
more to head the Department of Psychiatry 
at the City Hospitals. He later became resi- 
dent psychiatrist at the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital as a student of the late Adolf 
Meyer. He then accepted a position as 
clinical director of the Louisiana State 
Hospital and became senior physician later 
at the New Jersey State Hospital. During 
World War I he served as a major in the 
Medical Corps. After four years as director 
of the Illinois Society for Mental Hygiene 
and assistant professor of neurology and 
psychiatry at the University of Illinois, he 
became director of the Child Guidance 



Clinic program of the Commonwealth Fund 
of New York City. 

In 1927 he joined the staff of the School 
of Medicine and was associated with it for 
more than 23 years prior to his retirement. 



Dr. Paul D. Coleman Named 
Associate Editor of Bulletin 

Dr. Paul D. Coleman, Associate Professor 
of Physiology at the School of Medicine, has 
been named Associate Editor of the Bulletin 
of the School of Medicine. Dr. Coleman 
will assist in the preparation of special 
scientific articles concerning the develop- 
ment and highly important activities of a 
professional nature taking place in the 
School of Medicine. It is expected that he 
will prepare a series of articles concerning 
these important developments. 

A graduate of Tufts University in the 
class of 1948, Dr. Coleman received his 
Doctor of Philosophy Degree at the Uni- 
versity of Rochester in 1953. After a brief 
period of service in the United States Army, 
he served as assistant professor in the De- 
partment of Physiology at Tufts University 
and as an Associate at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, Computer Center. 
He then was appointed a Special Fellow to 
Johns Hopkins University School of Medi- 
cine in the Departments of Anatomy and 
Physiology, joining the Staff of the School 
of Medicine of the University of Maryland 
in 1962. Dr. Coleman has been active in 
the development of educational programs 
at the School of Medicine serving as a mem- 
ber of the Curriculum Committee. He is 
the author of more than 22 articles of a 
professional nature dealing with basic 
science research in physiology and par- 
ticularly with reference to the physiology 
of the nervous svstem. 



\\,l 5L No. 3 



faculty 



NOTES 



Department of Anatomy 

Dr. A'ernon E. Krahl, Professor of 
Anatoms. h.is just returned from Des 
Moines, Iowa, where he gave a series of 
guest lectures at the College of Osteopathic 
Medicine and Surgery. Dr. Krahl gave 
a convocation address to the Faculty and 
student body of the College on the subject 
"Neurovascular Control of the Peripheral 
Pulmonary Circulation." He also presented 
two seminars on the subjects: "Micro- 
anatomy of the .'\irv\ays" and "Relationships 
of Peripheral Pulmonary Vessels to the Lung 
Parenchyma." 

In June. Dr. Krahl attended the Fifth An- 
nual Pulmonary Workshop at the Webb- 
Waring Institute of the University of Colo- 
rado Medical Center. There he presented 
his new motion picture film on living ciliated 
epithelium and a demonstration of the 
preparation and microscopic observation of 
ciliated epithelium in the gills of Venus 
mercenaria. He then attended the Ninth 
Annual Conference on Research in Emphy- 
sema at Aspen, Colorado, where by invi- 
tation he presented a paper entitled 
"Mechanisms Controlling the Peripheral 
Circulation of the Lung with some Clinical 
Correlations." Later, Dr. Krahl presented 
his film on ciliary activity. 

From June 26th to July 2nd, 1966, he 
attended the Fourth European Conference 
on Microcirculation at Cambridge, England, 
where he presented a paper entitled "Further 
Studies on Perfusion of Pulmonary Alveolar 
Capillaries: the Effects of Exercise, Vagal 
Stimulation and of Adrenergic and Chol- 
inergic Agents."' 

Dr. Krahl is emminently known for his 
basic studies in the finer anatomy and physi- 
ology of the lung. 



Department of Medicine 

Dr. William S. Spicer, Jr., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and head of the Division 
of Pulmonary Diseases, has been nominated 
to the Maryland State Board of Health. Dr. 
Spicer replaces Dr. J. Edmund Bradley who 
resigned following his retirement from the 
School of Medicine. 



Department of Neurology 

Dr. Richard F. Mayer, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Neurology, has received a grant 
from the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation to 
support his study of the manner in which 
multiple sclerosis and other related diseases 
damage the central nervous system. 



Department of Pediatrics 

Dr. Thomas Christensen, resident in pedi- 
atrics at the University Hospital during the 
1930"s and until recently a private prac- 
titioner in Prince Georges County, Mary- 
land, died on May 3, 1966. 



Department of Radiology 

Dr. Fernando G. Bloedorn, Professor of 
Radiology at the School of Medicine, 
recently presented a paper entitled "Pre- 
operative Irradiation" at a meeting of the 
Club International de Telecobaltherapie at 
Modena, Italy. 



Dr. Gerald Wagger Appointed 

Assistant Director of Committee 

on Post-Graduate Courses 

Dr. E. T. Lisansky, Chairman and Director 
of the Committee on Post-Graduate Courses, 
has announced the appointment of Dr. 
Gerald Wagger as his Assistant Director. 
Dr. Wagger will assume his responsibility 
as a part-time venture and will continue his 
work in the Department of Medicine as an 



July, 1966 



Bl'LLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UXIVERSITY OF MARYLAXD 



Assistant Professor in the division of Gastro- 
enterology. 

A graduate of the University of North 
Carolina School of Medicine, Dr. Wagger 
completed his residency at the University 
Hospital in 1965 and has served as an In- 
structor in Medicine in the Division of 
Gastroenterology for the past year. The 
Post-Graduate Committee will now be in 
a position to implement certain programs 
that were heretofore unfeasible because of 
inadequate personnel. 

Faculty Participate in 1966 Spring 

Scientific Assembly of 

Maryland and D, C. Academies 

of General Pi'actice 

A number of Faculty members were 
active on the program of the Academy of 
General Practice Annual Meeting. These 
include Dr. Cyrus L. Blanchard who pre- 
sented a paper entitled "Inflammation of 
the Ear. Nose and Throat," Dr. Keith C. 



Morgan spoke on "Acute and Chronic In- 
flammation of the Bronchial Tree," Dr. 
Arthur L. Haskins delivered a paper on 
"Female Pelvic Inflammatory Disease" and 
Dr. Robert T. Singleton, Director of the 
Cardio-Vascular Laboratory, spoke on "In- 
flammatory Conditions of the Heart and 
Vascular System." 

Dr. John D. Young, Professor and head 
of the Department of Urology, spoke on 
"Inflammatory Conditions of the Genito- 
urinary System," while Dr. Harry M. Robin- 
son, Professor and head of the Department 
of Dermatology, spoke on "Common In- 
flammatory Disease of the Skin." This was 
supported by Dr. Merrill J. Snyder of the 
Department of Medicine who spoke on 
"Staphylococcal Septicemias." Dr. George 
N. Austin, head of the Department of Ortho- 
pedics, spoke on "Inflammatory Diseases of 
Bone and Joints." Dr. Samuel P. Bessman, 
Professor of Biochemistry, spoke on the sub- 
ject "Diabetes Mellitus and Oral Hypogly- 
cemic Agents." 



f'o/. ."il. \o. 3 



Publicalioiis of Slatt" of St-liool of Mojlirine 1964-1965 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Burns, T. A., ami Crispens, C. G., Jr. : Electron 
Microscope Investigation of Lactic De- 
lij'drogenasc Agent. Xaliirc (London), 201: 
1302, 1964. 

Crispe.vs, C. G., Jr. : Preliminary Studies on 
In Utcro Transmission of the Lactic De- 
hydrogenase .-Kgent, Aiiat. Rcc, 149: 511, 1964 
(abstract). 

Crispexs. C. G., Jr.: .\ Cage for L'se in Foster 
Nursing Studies with Mice. Aiiicr. J. Clin. 
Path.. 42: 332, 1964. 

Crispexs, C. G., Jr.: Mouse Plasma Lactic 
Dehydrogenase Elevation : Evidence for Two 
Particles, Virology, 24: S01-S02, 1964. 

Crispens, C. G., Jr. : The Lactic Dehydrogenase 
Agent: Its Possible Implications for the 
Virologist and Oncologist. Bull. Sch. Med. 
Univ. Maryland. 49: vii, 1964 (abstract). 

Crispexs, C. G., Jr. : Outline of Histology by 
Gerrit Bevelander, C. V. Mosby Co., St. 
Louis, 5th Ed., 332 pp., 1963. Quart. Rev. 
Biol., 39: 412, 1964 (book review). 

Crispexs, C. G., Jr.. and Buk.xs. T. A. : Electron 
Microscope Investigation of Lactic De- 
hydrogenase Agent, Xature (London), 204: 
1302, 1964. 

Kr.\hl, V. E. : Anatomy of Mammalian Lung, 
Handbook of Physiology, Section 3, Respira- 
tion. 1: 213-284, 1964. 

Kr.^hl, V. E. : The Lung as a Target Organ 
in Thromboembolism : Pulmonary Embolic 
Diseases, edited by Sasahara, Grune and 
Stratton, New York, pp. 13-22, 1965. 

Krahl. V. E. : Living Pulmonary Histology, 
Aging Of The Lung, edited by Gander and 
Moyer, Grune and Stratton, New York, pp. 
55-60, 1965. 

Kr.\hl. V. E. : A Classroom Demonstration of 
the Mechanism of the Larj'n.x, Turto.v Xczcs, 
43: 20-22, 1965. 

Krahl. \^. E. : In Vivo Microscopy of the 
Rabbit's Lung, Bibl. Anat., 4: 400-410, 1964. 

Krahl, V. E. : Anatomy of Mammalian Lung, 
Handbook of Physiology. Section 3, Respira- 
tion. 1: 213-284, 1964. 

Kr.\hl, V. E. : The Lung as a Target Organ 
in Thromboembolism. Pulmonary, 1965. 



DKl'AUTMKNT Ol' ANESTHESIOLOGY 

.\twiio[i, J. .\l., and Hklrich, M. : Modification 
of .Scrnyl .\ncsthesia with Halopcridol, 
Aneslh. Analg. (Cleveland), 43: 471, 1964. 

.\tw(ioi). J. M. : Respiratory Obstruction Dur- 
ing Bronchography, Anesthesiology. 26: 234, 
1965. 

Baker, L. R. : Nonrebreathing Assembly, 
Anesthesiology, 26: 229, 1965. 

Bessmax, S. p., Helrich, M., Mc.Aslax. T. C, 
and Skolxik. S. : .A Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology. 25: 711, 1964. 

Evers, J. L., Lowe, H. J., Hax, Y'. H., Gold, 
M. I., and Helrich, M. : The Central and 
Peripheral Effects of Halothane Upon Respi- 
ration in Man, Anesthesiology, 26: 249, 1965. 

Gold, M. I., and Helrich. M. : Response to 
Circulatory Stress in Man Following Anal- 
gesic Drugs. Acta Aiiesfh. Scand.. 15: 97, 
1964. 

Gold, M. I., and Helrich, M. : Circulatory Re- 
sponse to Tilting Following Methotrime- 
prazine and Morphine in Man, Anesthesi- 
ology, 25: 622, 1964. 

Gold. M. I., Evers, J. L., Lowe, H. J., Han, 
Y. H., and Helrich, M. : The Central and 
Peripheral Effects of Halothane Upon Respi- 
ration in Man, Anesthesiology, 26: 249, 1965. 

Gold, M. I., and Helrich. M. : Pulmonary 
Mechanics During General Anesthesia in 
Normal Man, Fed. Proc. 24: 268, 1965. 

Gold. AI. I., and Helrich. M. : Dynamic 
Pulmonary Compliance During .Anesthesia, 
Anesthesiology, 26: 281, 1965. 

Gold, M. I. : The Impact of Tranquilizers 
on Anesthesia, Audio-Digest, Anesthesiology, 
6: lOA, 1964. 

Gold, M. I. : Tranquilizers in the Surgical 
Patient, Surgery, 56: 1027, 1964. 

Gold, M. : The Hazards of Anesthetizing Asth- 
matic Patients, Allerg. Patient, 6: 1, 1965. 

Gold, M. I. : Anesthesia and Asthma, E.E.N. T. 
Digest. In press. 

Gold, M. I.: Respiratory Obstruction, Anes- 
thesiology. In press. 

Gold, M. I. : Tranquilizers and Other Central 
Depressants, Clin. Med. In press. 



/»/v, 1966 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Gold, M. I., and Helrich. M. : Mechanics of 
Breathing During Anesthesia. II. The In- 
fluence of Airway Adequacy, Anesthesiology. 
In press. 

Han, Y. H., Lowe, H. J., Evers, J. L., Gold, 
M. I., and Helrich, M. : The Central and 
Peripheral EiTects of Halothane Upon Respi- 
ration in Man, Anesthesiology, 26: 249, 1965. 

Helrich, M., and Gold, M. I. : Response to 
Circulatory Stress in Man Following Anal- 
gesic Drugs, Acta Anesth. Scand., 15: 97, 
1964. 

Helrich, AL, and Gold, M. I. : Circulatory 
Response to Tilting Following Metho- 
trimeprazine and Morphine in Man, Anes- 
thesiology, 25: 622, 1964. 

Helrich, M., McAslan, T. C, Skolnik, S., 
and Bessman, S. P. : A Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology, 25: 711, 1964. 

Helrich, M., and Atwood, J. M. : Modification 
of Sernyl Anesthesia With Haloperidol, 
Anesth. Analg. (Cleveland), 43: 471, 1964. 

Helrich, M., Gold, M. L, Evers, J. L., Lowe, 
H. J., Han, Y. H. : The Central and Peri- 
pheral Effects of Halothane Upon Respira- 
tion in Man, Anesthesiology, 26: 249, 1965. 

Helrich. M., Gold, M. I. : Pulmonary 
Mechanics During General Anesthesia in 
Normal Man, Fed. Proc., 24: 268, 1965. 

Helrich, M., and Gold, M. I. : Dynamic Pulmo- 
nary Compliance During Anesthesia, Anes- 
thesiology, 26: 281, 1965. 

Helrich, M., and Gold, M. I. : Mechanics of 
Breathing During Anesthesia. II. The In- 
fluence of Airway Adequacy, Anesthesiology. 
In press. 

Lowe, H. J., Hax, Y. H., Evers, J. L., Gold. 
M. I., and Helrich. M. : The Central and 
Peripheral Effects of Halothane LTpon Respi- 
ration in Man, Anesthesiology, 26: 249, 1965. 

McAsLAN, T. C. Helrich, M., Skolnik, S., 
and Bessman, S. P. : A Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology, 25: 711, 1964. 

Skolnik, S., Helrich, M., McAslan, T. C, 
and Bessman, S. P. : A Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology, 25: 711, 1964. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOPHYSICS 

Awad, M. Z., and Mullins, L. J. : The Control 



of the Membrane Potential of Muscle Fibers 
by the Sodium Pump, /. Gen. Physiol., 48: 
761-765, 1965. 

Barr, Charles E. : Sodium Regulation in 
Nitella, J. Gen. Physiol. In press, 1965. 

Brinley, F. J., Jr., and Mullins, L. J. : Ion 
Fluxes and Transference Number in Squid 
Axons, /. NeurophysioL, 28: 526-544, 1965. 

Frumexto, a. S., and Mullins, L. J.: Po- 
tassium-free Effect in Squid Axons, A'ature, 
204: 1312-1313, 1964. 

Henderson, E. G., and Sjodin, R. A. : Asym- 
metric Properties of the Muscle Cell Mem- 
brane Deduced from the Effects of Rubidium 
Ions on Potassium Movements. Presented at 
Biophysical Society Meeting, San Francisco, 
February, 1965. 

Hybl, a., Rundle, R. E., and Williams, D. E. : 
The Crystal and Molecular Structure of 
Cyclohexaamylose — Potassium Acetate Com- 
plex, /. Amer. Cheni. Soc. In press, 1965. 

Moore, R. D., and Zarrow, M. X. : Contraction 
of the Rabbit Mammary Strip in Vitro in 
Response to Oxytocin, Acta Endocr., (Koben- 
havn), 48: 186, 1965. 

Mullins, L. J., and Frumento, A. S. : Po- 
tassium-free Effect in Squid Axons, Nature, 
204: 1312-1313, 1964. 

Mullins, L. J., and Awad, M. Z. : The Con- 
trol of the Membrane Potential of Muscle 
Fibers by the Sodium Pump, /. Gen. Phxsiol., 
48: 761-775, 1965. 

Mullins, L. J., and Brinley, F. J., Jr. : Ion 
Fluxes and Transference Number in Squid 
Axons, J. NeurophysioL, 28: 526-544, 1965. 

Mullins, L. J. (Ed.) : A Conference on Newer 
Properties of Perfused Squid Axons, /. Gen. 
Physiol., 48: 1-92, (Part 2), 1965. 

RuNDLE, R. E., Hy-bl, a., and Williams, D. E. : 
The Crystal and Molecular Structure of 
Cyclohexaamylose — Potassium Acetate Com- 
plex, /. Amer. Client. Soc, 1965. In press. 

SjODiN, R. A. : The Potassium Flux Ratio in 
Skeletal Muscle as a Test for Independent 
Ion Movement, /. Gen. Physiol., 48: 777-796, 
1965. 

Sjodin, R. A. : Discussion Report : Newer 
Properties of Perfused Squid Axons, /. Gen. 
Physiol., 48: 83-92, (Part 2), 1965. 

SjoDiN, R. A., and Henderson, E. G. : Asym- 
metric Properties of the Muscle Cell Mem- 
brane Deduced from the Effects of Rubidium 
Ions on Potassium Movements. Presented at 



Vol. 51. No. 3 



MEinCAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



Biophysical Socifty Meeting, San Francisco, 
February, 1965. 

Williams, D. E., Rlxdle, R. E., and Hybl. 
A. : The Crystal and Molecular Structure of 
Cyclohexaamylose — Potassium Acetate Com- 
plex, /. Amcr. Chciii. Soc, 1965. In press. 

Z.\RR0\v, M. X., and Moore, R. D. : Contraction 
of the Rabbit Mammary Strip in Vitro in 
Response to Oxytocin, Acln Endcr. ( Kobcn- 
havn), 48: 186, 1965. 



DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL 
MEDICINE 

Barnett. H. C, and Gang.\R0sa, E. J.: Ob- 
servations On the Toxicity of Dichlovos 
(DDX'P) Vapors to Humans Following Pro- 
longed Exposure, J.A.M.A. In press. 

Gangarosa, E. J., and Barnett, H. C. : Ob- 
servations on the Toxicity of Dichlovos 
(DDVP) Vapors to Humans Following Pro- 
longed Exposure, J.A.M.A. In press. 

Gorten, at K., and Hefner, W. R. : Iron 
Balances in Small Premature Infants, 
Southcni Med. J., 57: 1462, 1964. 

Cortex. M. K., Hepxer, \V. R., and Workman, 
J. B. ; Iron Metabolism in Premature Infants 

1. Absorption and Utilization of Iron as 
Measured by Isotope Studies, Blood, 23: 551, 
1964 (abstract). 

Hepxer, W. R., and Gortex^ M. K. : Iron Bal- 
ances in Small Premature Infants, Southern 
Med. J.. 57: 1462, 1964. 

Hefner, W. R. : Care of the Premature, Curr. 
Therapy, 1965. 

Hefner, W. R., and Gorten, M. K., and Work- 
man, J. B. : Iron Metabolism in Premature 
Infants I. Absorption and Utilization of Iron 
as Aleasured by Isotope Studies, Blood, 23: 
551, 1964 (abstract). 

Hoogstraal, H., and McCarthy, V. : Subgenus 
Persicargas (Ixodidae, Argasidae, Argas) 

2. A. (P) abdussalami, n.sp.. Associated with 
Birds on Trees and Buildings near Lahore, 
Pakistan, J. Parasit. In press. 

Hoogstraal, H., and McCarthy, Y. : The 
Hosts and Distribution of Haemaphysalis 
(Herpetobia) Kashmireiisis Hoogstraal and 
Varma, /. Parasit. In press. 

Klimt, C, and Meinert, C. : A Population 
Based Study of the Familial Pattern of Re- 
ported Diabetes, /. Amer. Diet. Ass. Sub- 
mitted. 



Klimt, C, and Meinert, C. : Testing the Single- 
Gene .Autosomal Recessive Hypothesis in 
Proband Studies of Diabetes Mcllitus, J. 
.liner. Diet. Ass. Submitted. 

McCarthy, V., and Hoogstraal, H. : Subgenus 
Persicargas (Ixodidae, Argasidae, Arga.^) 2. 
A. (P) abdussalami, n.sp.. Associated with 
Wild Birds on Trees and Buildings near 
Lahore, Pakistan, /. Parasit. In press. 

McCarthy, V., and Hoogstraal, H. : The Hosts 
and Distribution of Haemaphysalis (Herpe- 
tobia) Kashmirensis Hoogstraal and Varma, 
J . Parasit. In press. 

Meinert, C, and Klimt, C. : A Population 
Based Study of the Familial Pattern of Re-- 
ported Diabetes, /. Amer. Diet. Ass. Sub- 
mitted. 

Meinert, C, and Klimt, C. : Testing the Single 
Gene Autosomal Recessive Hypothesis in Pro- 
band Studies of Diabetes Mellitus, /. Amer. 
Diet. Ass. Submitted. 

Tariq, Z. K. : A Preliminary Report of the. 
Mosquitoes in the Gilgit Agency Area, 
Pakistan J. Health. In press. 

Workman, J. B., Gorten, M. K., and Hepner, 
W. R. : Iron Metabolism in Premature 
Infants I. Absorption and Utilization of Iron 
as Measured by Isotope Studies, Blood, 23: 
551, 1964 (abstract). 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Greisman, Sheldon E., Hornick, R. B., and 
Woodward, T. E. : The Role of Endotoxin 
during Typhoid Fever and Tularemia in Man. 
III. Hyperreactivity to Endotoxin during 
Infection, /. Clin. Invest. 43: 1747, 1964. . 

Greisman, Sheldon E., and A\'oodward, W. E. : 
Mechanisms of Endotoxin Tolerance. III. 
The Refractory State during Continuous In- 
fusions of Endotoxin, /. E.rp. Med., 121: 
911, 1965. 

Hornick, R. B., Greisman, Sheldon E., and 
Woodward, T. E. : The Role of Endotoxin 
during Typhoid Fever and Tularemia in Man. 
III. Hyperreactivity to Endotoxin during In- 
fection, /. Clin, hives., 43: 1747, 1964. 

Morrison, Samuel : Editorial : The Hospital 
Trilemma, Maryland Med. J., 12: 435, 1963. 

Morrison, Samuel : On Dignity in the Medical 
Profession, Curr. Med. Dig., 30: 3, 1963. 

Morrison, Samuel : Editorial : Reflections of a 
Committee Chairman, Maryland Med. J., 12: 
537, 1963. . . ■ 



Julv, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Morrison, Samuel : Editorial : Ethics, Mary- 
land Med. ]., 13: 145, 1964. 

Morrison^ Samuel : Editorial : How Far, Cata- 
line?, Maryland Med. J., 13: 21, 1964. 

Morrison, Samuel: Doctor and Patient, The 
Morning Sun, January 11, 1965. 

Morrison, Samuel : Patient-Doctor Goals 
Stressed, The News American, January 13, 
1965. 

Woodward. T. E., Hornick. R. B., and Greis- 
man, Sheldon, E. : The Role of Endotoxin 
during Typhoid Fever and Tularemia in Man. 
III. Hyperreactivity to Endotoxin During In- 
fection, /. Clin. Invest., 43: 1747, 1964. 

Woodward, W. E., and Greisman, Sheldon, E. : 
Mechanisms of Endoto.xin Tolerance. III. The 
Refractory State during Continuous In- 
fusions of Endotoxin, /. E.i-p. Med., 121: 911, 
1965. 

Division of Arthritis 

Bhatavadekar, D., Rothschild, H., Schroed- 
ER, W. C, Heuckenkamp, p. U., Onodera, 
S., EwALD, R. W., Schubart, a. F., and 
PuLLEN, p. : Changes of Titer of Rheumatoid 
Factor, Termolabile Inhibitor, and Serum 
Complement During the Course of Rheuma- 
toid Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum., 8: 466, 1965. 

Bhatavadekar, D., Rothschild, H. J., 
Schroeder, W. C, Ewald, R. W., Schubart, 
A. F., and Pullen, P. : Serum Complement 
Levels in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Longi- 
tudinal Study of 43 Cases with Correlation of 
Clinical and Serological Data Including 
Rheumatoid Factor and Thermolabile In- 
hibitor of the F-11 L. P. Test, Ami. Rheum. 
Dis., 1965. In press. 

Ewald, R. W., Hornick, R. B., Schubart, 
A. F., Schroeder, W. C, Myerburg, R. J., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward, T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Properdin 
Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever. A 
Longitudinal Study of the Disease Including 
the Incubation Period and the Phase of Re- 
covery Following Treatment with Chlora- 
phenicol, /. Imtnun., 93: 387, 1964. 

Ewald, R. W., Schubart, A. F., Onodera, S., 
Heuckenkamp, P. U., Schroeder, W. C, 
Rothschild, H., Bhatavadekar, D., and 
Pullen, P. : Changes of Titer of Rheuma- 
toid Factor, Termolabile Inhibitor, and Serum 
Complement During the Course of Rheuma- 
toid Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum., 8: 466, 1965. 

Ewald, R. W., and Schubart, A. F. : Kinetic 



Studies of Serum Complement Components 
Creating Inhibition of the Agglutination Ac- 
tivating Activity of the Rheumatoid Factor, 
Arthritis Rheum., 8: 467, 1965. 
Ewald, R. W., and Schubart, A. F. : Studies 
Concerning the Possible Identity of Watson's 
Antiglobulin and the First Component of 
Complement in the Latex Fixation Test, 
Arthritis Rheum., 8: 442, 1965. 

Ewald, R. W., Schubart, A. F., Schroeder, 
W. C, Rothschild, H. J., Bhatavadekar, 
D., and Pullen, P. : Serum Complement 
Levels in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Longi- 
tudinal Study of 43 Cases with Correlation of 
Clinical and Serological Data Including 
Rheumatoid Factor and Thermolabile In- 
hibitor of the F-11 L. P. Test, Ann. Rheum. 
Dis., 1965. In press. 

Ewald, R. W., Onodera, S., Heuckenkamp, 
P. U., and Schubart, A. F. : Incidence of 
Anti-nuclear Factors in Patients with Rheum- 
atoid .'Krthritis. A Comparison of Comple- 
ment Fixation and Latex Particle Agglutina- 
tion Techniques. Submitted for publication in 
Ann. Rheum. Dis. 

Goodman, J. S., Myerburg, R. J., Schroeder, 
W. C, Ewald, R. W., Hornick, R. B., Schu- 
bart, A. F., and Woodward, T. E. : Changes 
of Serum Complement and Properdin Levels 
in Experimental Typhoid Fever. A Longi- 
tudinal Study of the Disease Including the 
Incubation Period and the Phase of Re- 
covery Following Treatment with Chlora- 
phenicol, /. Immun., 93: 387, 1964. 

Heuckenkamp, P. U., Onodera, S., Ewald. 
R. W., Schubart, A. F., Schroeder, W. C, 
Rothschild, H., Bhatavadekar, D., and 
Pullen, P. : Changes of Titer of Rheumatoid 
Factor, Termolabile Inhibitor, and Serum 
Complement During the Course of Rheuma- 
toid Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum., 8: 466, 1965. 

Heuckenkamp, P. U., Ewald, R. W., Ono- 
dera, S., and Schubart, A. F. : Incidence of 
Anti-nuclear Factors in Patients with Rheum- 
atoid Arthritis. A Comparison of Comple- 
ment Fixation and Latex Particle Agglutina- 
tion Techniques. Submitted for publication in 
Ann. Rheum. Dis. 

Hornick, R. B., Schubart, A. F., Ewald. 
R. W., Schroeder, W. C, Myerburg. R. J., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward, T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Properdin 
Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever. A 
Longitudinal Study of the Disease Including 



J'o/. >1. No. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOS' 



the Inciihatioii Pi-riod and the Phase of Re- 
covery Following Treatment witli Chlora- 
phenicol, /. Immiin.. 93: 387, 1964. 

MVERBURG, R. J., SCHROEDER, W. C, EwALD, 
R. \V., HORNICK, R. B., SCHUBART, A. F., 

Goodman. J. S., and Woodward. T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Properdin 
Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever. A 
Longitudinal Study of the Disease Including 
the Incubation Period and the Phase of Re- 
covery Following Treatment with Chlora- 
phenicol. /. Immun.. 93: 387, 1964. 

OXODERA. S., E\\ Al.l). R. W'.. ScHUBART, A. F., 

Hevckk.nkamp. p. L'., Schroeder, W. C, 
RoTHSt'iiH.u. H.. Bhatavadekar. D., and 
PuLLF.x. p.: Changes of Titer of Rheuma- 
toid Factor, Termolabile Inhibitor, and Scrum 
Complement During the Court of Rheumatoid 
.Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum.. 8: 466, 196S. 

Oxodera. S., Ewald, R. W. Heuckenkamp, 
P. L'., and ScnuBART. .\. F. : Incidence of 
.Anti-nuclear Factors in Patients with Rheum- 
atoid .Arthritis. .A Comparison of Complement 
Fixation and Latex Particle Agglutination 
Techniques. Submitted tor publication in 
Aitii. Rheum. Dis. 

PvLLEX. P., Bhatavadekar, D., Rothschild, 
H., Schroeder. W. C, Heuckenkamp, P. U., 
Oxodera, S., Ewald, R. W., Schubart, 
-A. F. : Changes of Titer of Rheumatoid 
Factor, Termolabile Inhibitor, and Serum 
Complement During the Course of Rheuma- 
toid Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum., 8: 466, 1965. 

Pullen, p., Bhatavadekar, D., Rothschild, 
H. J., Schroeder. W. C, Ewald, R. W., 
ScHL-BART, A. F. : Serum Complement Levels 
in Rheumatoid .Arthritis. A Longitudinal 
Study of 43 Cases with Correlation of Clinical 
and Serological Data Including Rheumatoid 
Factor and Thermolabile Inhibitor of the 
F-11 L. P. Test, Ann. Rheum. Dis., 1965. 
In press. 

Rothschild, H., Schroeder, W. C, Heucken- 
KAMP, P. U., Oxodera. S., Ewald. R. W., 
Schubart, A. F., Bhatavadekar. D., and 
PuLLEN, P. : Changes of Titer of Rheuma- 
toid Factor, Termolabile Inhibitor, and Serum 
Complement During the Course of Rheuma- 
toid Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum., 8: 466, 1965. 

Rothschild, H. J., Schroeder, W. C. Ewald, 
R. \V., Schubart, A. F., Bhatavadekar. D., 
and PuLLE.x, P. : Serum Complement Levels 
in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Longitudinal 
Study of 43 Cases with Correlation of Clinical 



and Serological Data Including Rheuni;itoi<l 
Factor and Thermolabile Inhibitor of the 
F-11 L. P. Test, Ami. Rheum. Dis., 1965. 
In press. 
Schroeder. W. C, Ewald. R. W., Hornick, 
R. B., Schubart. .A. F., Mverburo. R. J., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward. T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Proper- 
din Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever. 
.A Longitudinal Study of the Disease Includ- 
ing the Incubation Period and the Phase of 
Recovery Following Treatment with Chlora- 
phenicol, J. Immun., 93: 387, 1964. 

Schroeder. W. C, Heuckenkamp, P. U., O.xo- 
dera. S., Ewald, R. W., Schubart, A. F., 
Roth.schild. H., Bhatavadekar. D., and 
Pullen, P. : Changes of Titer of Rheumatoid 
Factor, Termolabile Inhibitor, and Scrum 
Complement During the Course of Rheuma- 
toid Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum., 8: 466, 1965. 

Schroeder, W. C, Ewald, R. W., Schubart, 
\. F., Rothschild, H. J., Bhatavadekar, D., 
and Pullen, P. : Serum Complement Levels 
in Rheumatoid Arthritis. .A Longitudinal 
Study of 43 Cases with Correlation of Clinical 
and Serological Data Including Rheumatoid 
Factor and Thermolabile Inhibitor of the 
F-11 L. P. Test, Ann. Rheum. Dis., 1965. 
In press. 

Schubart, A. F., Heuckexkamp, P. U., 
Ewald, R. W., Ondera, S. : Incidence of 
Anti-nuclear Factors in Patients with Rheum- 
atoid Arthritis. A Comparison of Complement 
Fixation and Latex Particle Agglutination 
Techniques. Submitted for publication in 
Ann. Rheum. Dis. 

Schubart, A. F., Hornick, R. B., Ewald, 
R. W., Schroeder, W. C, Myerburg, R. J., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward. T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Proper- 
din Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever. 
A Longitudinal Study of the Disease Includ- 
ing the Incubation Period and the Phase 
of Recovery Following Treatment with 
Chloraphenicol, /. Immun., 93: 387, 1964. 

Schubart, A. F., Ewald, R. W., Onodera. S., 
Heuckenkamp. P. U., Schroeder, W. C, 
Rothschild, H., Bhat.wadekar, D., and 
Pullen, P. : Changes of Titer of Rheuma- 
toid Factor, Thermolabile Inhibitor, and 
Serum Complement During the Course of 
Rlieumatoid Arthritis, Arthritis Rheum., 8: 
466, 1965. 

Schubart, A. F., and Ewald, R. W. : Kinetic 



/»/v, 1966 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UKU'ERSITY OF MARYLAXD 



Studies of Serum Complement Components 
Creating Inhibition of the Agglutination 
Activating Activity of the Rheumatoid Factor, 
Arthritis Rheum., 8: 467, 1965. 

ScHUBART, A. F., and Ewald, R. W. : Studies 
Concerning the Possible Identity of Watson's 
Antiglobulin and the First Component of 
Complement in the Latex Fixation Test, 
Arthritis Rheum., 8: 442, 1965. 

ScHUBART. A. F., Ewald, R. W., Schroeder, 
W. C, Rothschild, H. J., Bhatavadekar, 
D., and Pullen, P. : Serum Complement 
Levels in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Longi- 
tudinal Study of 43 Cases with Correlation of 
Clinical and Serological Data Including 
Rheumatoid Factor and Thermolabile In- 
hibitor of the F-11 L. P. Test, Ann. Rheum. 
Dis., 1965. In press. 

Woodward, T. E., Goodman, J. S., Myerburg, 
R. J., Schroeder, W. C, Ewald, R. W., 
HoRNicK, R. B., and Schubart. A. F. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Proper- 
din Levels in E.xperimental Typhoid Fever. 
A Longitudinal Study of the Disease Includ- 
ing the Incubation Period and the Phase of 
Recovery Following Treatment with Chlora- 
phenicol, /. Immun.. 93: 387, 1964. 

Division of Cardiology 

AxTLiTZ. A. M., and Dembo, D. H. : Chloridia- 
zeporide Therapy in Angina Pectoris. A 
Double Blind Study, Angiology, 15: 207, 1964. 

Antlitz, a. M., and Boudreau, R. : Congenital 
Isolated Mitral Insufficiency, Dis. Chest, 46: 
Aug., 1964. 

Baker, E. L., Serpick, A. A., and Woodward, 
T. E. : Motor System Disease. Review and 
Discussion of a Case Presenting with Alveo- 
lar Hypoventilation, Arch. Intern. Med., 115: 
192, 1965. 

Boudreau, R., and Antlitz, A. AI. : Congenital 
Isolated Mitral Insufficiency, Dis. Chest, 46: 
Aug., 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., and Dembo, D. H. : Left Atrial 
Thrombosis with Ball Valve Action. Report 
of a Case with Successful Surgical Removal, 
Arch. Intern. Med., 114: 139, 1964. 

Dembo, D. H., and Antlitz, A. M. : Chloridia- 
zeporide Therapy in Angina Pectoris. A 
Double Blind Study, Angiology, 15: 207, 1964. 

Dembo, D. H., and Singleton, R. T. : Kryp- 
ton-8S in the Detection of Left to Right 
Shunts, Circulation. In press. 



Dembo, D. H., Scherlis, L., and Jude, J.: 
Definitive Therapy in Cardiopulmonary 
Resuscitation, Amer. Heart J., 1965. 

Dembo, D. H., Scherlis, L., Jude, J., and 
Farr, M. : The Nurses' Role in Cardiopulmo- 
nary Resuscitation, Amer. Heart J. In press. 

Dembo, D. H., and Cowley, R. A. : Left Atrial 
Tronibosis with Ball Valve Action. Report of 
a Case with Successful Surgical Removal, 
Arch. Intern. Med., 114: 139, 1964. 

Farr, M., Jude. J., Scherlis, L., and Dembo, 
D. H. : The Nurses' Role in Cardiopulmonary 
Resuscitation, Amer. Heart J. In press. 

Farr, M., Jude, J., and Scherlis, L. : Emer- 
gency Measures in Cardiopulmonary Resusci- 
tation, Amer. Heart J., 1965. 

Jude, J., Scherlis, L., and Dembo. D. H. : 
Definitive Therapy in Cardiopulmonary Re- 
suscitation, Amer. Heart J., 1965. 

Jude, J., Scherlis, L., Dembo, D. H., and 
Farr, M. : The Nurses' Role in Cardiopulmo- 
nary Resuscitation, Amer. Heart J. In press. 

Jude, J., Scherlis, L., and Farr, M. : Emer- 
gency Measures in Cardiopulmonary Resusci- 
tation, Amer. Heart J., 1965. 

Lee, y. C, Scherlis, L., and Singleton, R. T. : 
Mitral Stenosis. Hemodynamic, Electrocardio- 
graphic and Vectorcardiographic Studies, 
Amer. Heart J., 69: 559, 1965. 

Lee. Y. C, Papadopoulos, C, and Scherlis, L. : 
Isolated Ventricular Septal Defect. Hemody- 
namic, Electrocardiographic and \'ector- 
cardiographic Studies, Amer. J. Cardiol. In 
press. 

P.\p.\DOPOULos, C, Lee, Y. C, and Scherlis, L. : 
Isolated Ventricular Septal Defect. Hemody- 
namic, Electrocardiographic and Vectorcardio- 
graphic Studies, Amer. J. Cardiol. In press. 

RuBENSTEiN, H. J., and W^eaver, K. : Monozy- 
gotic Twins Concordant for an Interventricu- 
lar Septal Defect, Amer. J. Cardiol, 15: 386, 
1965. 

Scherlis. L., Lee, Y. C, and Singleton. R. T. : 
Mitral Stenosis. Hemodynamic, Electrocardio- 
graphic and Vectorcardiographic Studies, 
Amer. Heart J., 69: 559, 1965. 

Scherlis, L., Dembo, D. H., and Jude, J.: 
Definitive Therapy in Cardiopulmonary Re- 
suscitation, Amer. Heart J.. 1965. 

Scherlis, L., Dembo, D. H., Jude, J., and 
Farr, M. : The Nurses' Role in Cardiopulmo- 
nary Resuscitation, Amer. Heart J. In press. 

Scherlis, L., Jude, J., and Farr. M. : Emer- 



Vol. ^1. Xo 3 



MEDlC.tL SCHOOL SF.CTIOX 



gency Measures in Cardiopulmonary Resusci- 
tation, Amcr. Heart J., 1965. 

ScHERLis. L.. Lee. V. C, and PAPAnopoui-os, C. : 
Isolated \'entricular Septa! Defect. Hemody- 
namic. Electrocardiographic and Vectorcardio- 
grapliic Studies, Amcr. J. Cardiol. In press. 

ScHERLis. L. : Book review: Circulation and 
Respiration. Cur. Med. Dig., 32: 111, 1965. 

ScHERLis. S. : Stress, Trauma, and Heart Dis- 
ease. Chapter in Cyclopedia of Medicine, F. A. 
Davis Co., 1965. 

Serpick, .\. A., Baker, E. L., and Woodward. 
T. E. : Motor System Disease. Review and 
Discussion of a Case Presenting with Alveolar 
Hypoventilation, Arch. Intent. Med.. 115: 
192, 1965. 

SixGLETOx. R. T., ScHERLis, L., and Lee. Y. C. : 
Mitral Stenosis. Hemodynamic, Electrocardio- 
graphic and Vectorcardiographic Studies, 
Amcr. Heart J., 69: 559, 1965. 

Singleton, R. T., and Dembo. D. H. : Krypton- 
85 in the Detection of Left to Right Shunts, 
Circulation. In press. 

^^'E.\VER. K., and Rubexsteix, H. J.: Monozy- 
gotic Twins Concordant for an Interventricu- 
lar Septal Defect. Amcr. J. Cardiol., 15: 386, 
1965. 

Woodward. T. E., Baker. E. L., and Serpick. 
A. A. : Motor System Disease. Review and 
Discussion of a Case Presenting with Alveo- 
lar Hypoventilation, Arch. Intern. Med., 115: 
192, 1965. 



Division of Dermatology 

Berestox. E. S. : Contact Dermatitis in the 
Home and in Industry. W. Virginia Med. J., 
66-73, 1964. 

Berestox, E. S., and Roberts, Daxiel : Con- 
genital Hypertrophy of Limbs, Southern Med. 
J.. 58: 302, 1965. 

Burnett, J. W., and Pathak, M. A.: The 
Porphyrin Content of Skin, /. Invest. Derm., 
43: 119-120, 1964. 

Burnett, J. W., and Pathak, M. A. : The 
Intracellular Localization of Porphyria. /. 
Invest. Derm., 43: 421-27, 1964. 

Burnett, J. W., and Frothingham, T. E. : 
The Cytopathic Effect of Fowlpox Suspensions 
in Primary Human Amnion Cell Cultures in 
Clinical Research. In press. 

Frothixgham, T. E., and Burxett, J. W. : 
The Cytopathic Effect of Fowlpox Suspensions 



in Primary Human .\mnion Cell Cultures in 

Clinical Research. In press. 
Harmon, L. E. : Melanogenesis and Pigmentary 

Disturbances, Natl. Med. J., 56: 501, 1964. 
Pathak. M. A., and Burnett. J. W. : The 

Porphyrin Content of Skin, /. Invest. Derm., 

43: 119-120, 1964. 
Pathak, M. A., and Burnett. J. W. : The 

Intracellular Localization of Porphyria, /. 

Invest. Derm.. 43: 421-27, 1964. 
Raskin. Joan, and Robixsox, H. M., Jr.': 

Tolnaftatc, a Potent Topical Antifungal 

Agent, Arch. Derm. (Chicago), 91: 372, 1965. 
Raskin, Joan : Fluorescent Antibody Studies 

of Certain Dermatoses, Arch. Derm. (Qii- 

cago), 569, 579, 1964. 
Raskin, Jo.\n : Cutaneous Lesions Associated 

with Cardiac Dysfunction, Maryland Med. I., 

1312: 59-61, 1964. 
Roberts, Daniel, and Bereston, E. S. : Con- 
genital Hypertrophy of Limbs, Southern Med. 

/., 58: 302, 1965. 
Robinson, H. M., Jr.. and Raskin, Joan: 

Tolnaftate, a Potent Topical Antifungal 

Agent, Arch. Derm. (Chicago), 91: 372, 

1965. 
Robinson, H. M., Jr.: Rehabilitation, Arch. 

Derm. (Chicago), 91: 128-205, 1965. 
Robinson, H. M., Jr. : Das Lipoid-Histocytom- 

Der Hautarzi, 15, Jahrgang, 6 Heft, 323-24, 

1964. 
Robinson, R. C. V. : Long Term Therapy with 

Sulfadimethoxine, Toxicity Studies, Southern 

Med. J. In press. 
Robinson, R. C. V. : Allergic and Inflammatory 

Dermatoses, Curr. Med. Dig. In press. 
Robinson, R. C. V. : Fungas Diseases in Gen- 
eral Practice, Curr. Med. Dig. In press. 
Robinson, R. C. V. : The Aging Skin, Bull. 

Maryland Acad. Gen. Practice. In press. 

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism 

Bacmgardner, George R., Stauffer, Martha 
E., Wright, James C, Connor, Thomas B., 
and Blizzard, Robert M. : L'rinary Hydroxy- 
proline as a Pleasure of Growth Hormone 
Activity in Man. Forty-fifth Meeting of the 
Endrocrine Society held in Atlantic City, 
New Jersey, June 13-15, 1963. 

Baumgardner, G., Stauffer, M., and Connor, 
T. B. : Bone Matrix Metabolism in Parathy- 
roid Disease. Clin. Res.. 11: 2-214. 1963. 



July, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Baumgardner, G., Stauffer, M.. Heck, A. F., 
and Connor. T. B. : Reversible Muscular 
Atrophy in Hyperparathyroidism, Neurology, 
14: 256-257, 1964 (abstract). 

Bessman, Samuel, P. : Amino Acid Excretion 
Following Administration of C14 Labeled 
Histidine in Children with Cerebro Macular 
Degeneration. Presented at the First Pan 
American Congress of Neurology in Lima, 
Peru, October 20-25, 1963. 

Bessman. Samuel P. : Phenyliketonuria, Med. 
Sci.. 16: 35, 1965. 

Blizzard, Robert M., Connor, Thomas, B., 
Wright, James C, Stauffer, Martha E., 
and Baumgardner, George R. : Urinary 
Hydroxyproline as a Measure of Growth 
Hormone Activity in Man. Forty-fifth Meet- 
ing of the Endocrine Society held in Atlantic 
City, New Jersey. June 13-15, 1963. 

Connor, Thomas B., Wright, James C, 
Stauffer, Martha E., Baumgardner, 
George R., and Blizzard, Robert M. : Uri- 
nary Hydroxyproline as a Measure of Growth 
Hormone Activity in Man. Forty-fifth Meet- 
ing of the Endocrine Society held in Atlantic 
City, New Jersey, June 13-15, 1963. 

Connor, T. B., Stauffer, M., and Baumgard- 
ner, G. : Bone Matrix Metabolism in Para- 
thyroid Disease, Clin. Res., 11: 2-214, 1963. 

Connor. T. B., and Lovice^ Harris: Observa- 
tions on Renal Function Before and After 
Correction of Hypercalcemia, Tran.<:. Amer. 
Clin. Cliinat. Ass.. 74: 1962, published August, 
1963. 

Connor, T. B., and Workman. Joseph B. : 
Preoperative Localization of Parathyroid 
Adenomata, /. Niiel. Med.. 5: 372-373, 1964 
■ ( abstract ) . 

Connor. T. B., Heck, A. F., Stauffer. J. C, 
and Baumgardner. G. R. : Reversible Muscu- 
lar Atrophy in Hyperparathyroidism, Neur- 
ology. 14: 256-257. 1964 (abstract). 

Connor. T. B., Ganis, F. M., Levin, H. S., 
Martin, L. G., and Waldasin, G. L. : 
Clinical and Biochemical Studies in a Gonado- 
tropin Dependent Virilizing Ovarian Tumor, 
Clin. Res.. 13: 243, 1965 (abstract). 

Connor. T. B., Wildasin. G. L., and Ganis, 
F. M. : In Vitro Production of Dehydroepian- 
drosterone by Virilizing Krukenberg Tumor 
of the Ovary, Fed. Proc., 24: 535, (Part I), 
1965. 

Connor. T. B., Scott, S. H., Huffer, V., and 



Lovice. H. : Psychological Studies of Adult 
Male Patients with Sexual Infantilism Be- 
fore and After Andogen Therapy, .Inn. In- 
tern. Med.. 61: 2, 1964. 

Ganis. Frank, M. : A Convenient Beaker 
Holder, Chemist-Analyst, 53: 52, 1964. 

Ganis. F. M., Connor. T. B., Levin, H. S., 
Martin, L. G., and Wildasin, G. L. : 
Clinical and Biochemical Studies in a Gona- 
dotropin Dependent Virilizing Ovarian 
Tumor, Clin. Res.. 13: 243, 1965 (abstract). 

Ganis. F. M., Wildasin, G. L., and Connor, 
T. B. : In Vitro Production of Dehydroepian- 
drosterone by Virilizing Krukenberg Tumor 
of the Ovary, Fed. Proc.. 24: 535, (Part I), 
1965. 

Good. Thomas A. : Studies on the Types of 
Gargoylism and Acid Mucopolysaccharide 
Excretion. Presented at the Third Pan 
American Congress on Rheumatic Diseases at 
Santiago, Chile, October 15-19, 1963. 

Heck, A. F., Connor, T. B., Stauffer, J. C, 
and Baumgardner. G. R. : Reversible Muscu- 
lar Atrophy in Hyperparathyroidism, Neur- 
ology, 14: 256-257, 1964 (abstract). 

Huffer, V., Scott, W. H., Connor, T. B., and 
Lovice, H. : Psychological Studies of Adult 
Male Patients with Sexual Infantilism Before 
and After Androgen Therapy, Ann. Intern. 
Med.. 61: 2, 1964. 

Levin. H. S., Connor, T. B., Ganis. F. M., 
Martin, L. G., and Wildasin, G. L. ; 
Clinical and Biochemical Studies in Gona- 
dotropin Dependent Virilizing Ovarian 
Tumor, Clin. Res., 13: 243, 1965 (abstract). 

Lovice. Harris, and Connor, T. B. : Observa- 
tions on Renal Function Before and After 
Correction of Hypercalcemia, Trans. Amer. 
Clin. Cliniat. Ass.. 74: 1962, published .August, 
1963. 

Lovice. H., Connor, T. B.. Scott, S. H., and 
Huffer. V.: Psychological Studies of Adult 
Male Patients with Sexual Infantilism Be- 
fore and after Androgen Therapy, Ann. Inter. 
Med.. 61: 2, 1964. 

Martin, L. G., Levin, H. S., Connor, T. B., 
Ganis, F. M., and Wildasin, G. L. : Clinical 
and Biochemical Studies in a Gonadotropin 
Dependent Virilizing Ovarian Tumor, Clin. 
Res., 13: 243, 1965 (abstract). 

RouBEx, M. J.. S.\CKS. M. S., and Spurling, 
C. L. : Juvenile Pernicious Anemia, Nczi' 
Eng. J. Med.. 271: 995-1003, 1964. 



r<)/. M, No. 3 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



Sacks. M. S., Spurlinx. C. L., and Rolbex. 
M. T. : Juvenile Pernicious Anemia, Xczc 
Eiui. J. Med.. 271: 9<)5-1003, l')64. 

Scott. W. H., Hlkkek. X ., Connor. T. B.. and 
LoviCE. H. : Psychological Studies of Adult 
i[ale Patients with Sexual Infantilism Be- 
fore and After Androgen Therapy, Ann. 
Intern. Med.. 61: 2. 1964. 

Si'VRLixG. C. L., Sacks. M. S., and Roitben, 
M. J.: Juvenile Pernicious Anemia, A'ltc Eng. 
J. Med.. 271: 995-1003, 1964. 

Stavffer. Martha E.. Baumgardner, George 
R., Wright. James C. Connor. THo^^AS B., 
and Blizzard. Robert M. : Urinary Hydro.xy- 
proline as a Measure of Growth Hormone 
-Activity in Man. Forty-fifth Meeting of the 
Endocrine Society held in Atlantic City, Xew 
Jersey, June 13-15, 1963. 

Stauffer. M., Baumgardner, G., and Connor. 
T. B. : Bone Matrix Metabolism in Parathy- 
roid Disease, Clin. Res., 11: 2-214, 1963. 

Stalffer. M., Connor. T. B., Heck, A. P., and 
Baumgardner. G. R. : Reversible Muscular 
.Atrophy in Hyperparathyroidism, X'eiirology, 
14: 256-257, 1964 (abstract). 

Wildasin, G. L., Martin, L. G., Levin. H. S., 
CoN.NOR, T. B.. and G.\Nis, F. M. : Clinical 
and Biochemical Studies in a Gonadotropin 
Dependent \'irilizing Ovarian Tumor, Clin. 
Res.. 13: 243. 1965 (abstract). 

^\'ILDASIN, G. L., G.\Nis. F. M., and Connor, 
T. B. : In Vitro Production of Dehj-droepian- 
drosterone by Virilizing Krukenberg Tumor 
of the Ovary. Fed. Proe., 24: 425, (Part I), 
1965. 

^^'oRKMAN, J. B., and Connor, T. B. : Pre- 
operative Localization of Parathyroid Adeno- 
mata, /. Nuc. Med., 5: 372-i7i, 1964 (ab- 
stract). 

A\"right, James C, Stauffer, Marth.\ E., 
B.\umcardner, George R., Connor, Thom-\s 
B., and Blizzard, Robert M. : Urinary Hy- 
dro-xyproline as a Measure of Growth Hor- 
mone .Activity in Man. Forty-fifth Meeting 
of the Endocrine Society held in Atlantic 
Cit}-, X'ew Jersey, June 13-15, 1963. 

Division of Hypertensive — Renal Diseases 

Asplen, C. H., Borges, F. J., and Wood, C. : 
-Acute Renal Failure -After Oral Cholecysto- 
graphy, /. Lancet, 2: 340, 1964. 

AsPLE.N, C. H., Borges, F. J., and A\'ood, C. : 
Renal Failure -After Cholecystography, /. 
Urol.. 4: 54, 1965. 



-Attar, S., Borges. F., Esmond, W. G., Blair, 
E.. and Cowley. R. A. : Prevention of Renal 
Failure in Open Heart Surgery. Proceedings 
of .Xational Congress of Surgery. liucharesl, 
Rumania. 

Blair, E., Esmond, W. G., Borges, F. J., .Xttar, 
S., and Cowlev, R. A.: Prevention of Renal 
Failure in Open Heart Surgery. Proceedings 
of Xational Congress of Surgery, Bucharest, 
Rumania. 

Borges. F. J., .-\sple.n-. C. H., and Wood. C. : 
-Acute Renal Failure .Alter Oral Cholecysto- 
graphy. Lancet, 2: 340, 1964. 

Borges. F. J., Wood, C, and Asplen, C. H. : 
Renal Failure After Cholecystography, /. 
Urol., 4: 54, 1965. 

Borges. F. J., .Attar. S., Esmond. W. G., 
Blair, E., and Cowlev. R. .A. : Prevention 
of Renal Failure in Open Heart Surgery. 
Proceedings of Xational Congress of Surgery, 
Bucharest, Rumania. 

Cowlev, R. A., Blair, E., Es.mond. W. G., 
Borges. F. J., and .Attar, S. : Prevention 
of Renal Failure in Open Heart Surgery. 
Proceedings of National Congress of Surgery, 
Bucharest, Rumania. 

Esmond, W. G., Borges, F. J., .Attar, S., 
Blair, E., and Cowley, R. .A. : Prevention 
of Renal Failure in Open Heart Surgery. 
Proceedings of Xational Congress of Surgery, 
Bucharest, Rumania. 

Wood, C, Asplen, C. H., and Borges, F. J. : 
-Acute Renal Failure After Oral Cholecysto- 
graphy, Lancet, 2: 340, 1964. 

Wood, C, Borges, F. J., and Asplen, C. H. : 
Renal Failure After Cholecystography. /. 
Urol., 4: 54, 1965. 

Division of Infectious Diseases 

Eigelsbach, H. T., and Hornick. R. B.: 
Occupational Tularemia. Occupational Dis- 
eases Acquired from Animals. Published by 
the University of Michigan School of Public 
Health, pp. 295-301, 1964 (monograph). 

EwALD, R. W., Hornick. R. B., Schubart, 
-A. F., Schroeder, W. C, Myerburg. R. J., 
Goodman. J. S., and Woodward, T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Properdin 
Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever, /. 
Immun., 93: 387-395, 1964 

Good.man, J. S., Myerburg, R. J., Schroeder, 
W. C, EwALD, R. W., Hornick, R. B., 
Schubart, -A. F., and Woodward, T. E. : 



/i(/v. ^66 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Changes of Serum Complement and Proper- 
din Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever, 
J. ImmuH., 93: 387-395, 1964. 

Herring, R. D., Hornick, R. B., and Eigels- 
BACH, H. T. : Tularemia Prophylaxis : New 
Liver Vaccine Strains. American Society for 
Microbiology, April, 196S (abstract). 

Hornick, R. B., and Eigelsbach, T. T. : Occu- 
pational Tularemia. Occupational Diseases Ac- 
quired from Animals. Published by the Uni- 
versity of Michigan School of Public Health, 
pp. 295-301, 1964 (monograph). 

Hornick, R. B., and Overholt, E. : Primary 
Cutaneous Coccidioidomycosis, Arch. Int. 
Med.. 114: 149-153, 1964. 

Hornick, R. B., Schubart, A. F., Ewald, 
R. W., Schroeder, W. C, Myerburg, R. J., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward. T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Properdin 
Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever, /. 
Immun., 93: 387-395, 1964. 

Hornick, R. B. : Typhoid Fever, Ticc's Text- 
book of Medicine. In press. 

Hornick, R. B., and Woodward, T. E. : Typhoid 
Fever and Rickettsial Diseases, Harrison's 
Textbook of Medicine. In preparation. 

Jackson, E., and Smadel, J. : Rickettsial In- 
fections, Diagnostic Procedures III Edition, 
November, 1964. 

Myerburg, R. J., Schroeder, W. C, Ewald, 
R. W., Hornick, R. B., Schubart, A. F., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward. T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Properdin 
Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever, /. 
Immun. 93: 387-395, 1964. 

OvERHOLT, E., and Hornick, R. B. : Primary 
Cutaneous Coccidioidomycosis, Arch. Int. 
Med., 114: 149-153, 1964. 

Schroeder, W. C, Ewald, R. W., Hornick, 
R. B., Schubart, A. F., Myerburg, R. J., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward, T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Properdin 
Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever, 
/. Immun., 93: 387-395, 1964. 

Schubart, A. F., Hornick, R. B., Ewald, 
R. W., Schroeder, W. C, Myerburg, R. J., 
Goodman, J. S., and Woodward. T. E. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Proper- 
din Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever, 
J. Immun., 93: 387-395, 1964. 

Smadel, J., and Jackson, E. : Rickettsial In- 
fections, Diagnostic Procedures III Edition, 
November, 1964. 



Togo, Y. : Hemagglutination-Inhibition Test in 
the Study of Measles Immunity. Amcr. J. 
Hyg.. 79: 250-259, 1964. 

Woodward, T. E., Goodman. J. S., Myerburg, 
R. J., Schroeder, W. C, Ewald, R. W., 
Hornick, R. B., and Schubart, A. F. : 
Changes of Serum Complement and Proper- 
din Levels in Experimental Typhoid Fever, 
/. Immun., 93: 387-395, 1964. 

Woodward, T. E., and Hornick, R. B.: 
Typhoid Fever and Rickettsial Diseases, 
Harrison's Tc.rtbook of .Medicine. In prepara- 
tion. 



Division of Pulmonary Diseases 

Blide, R. W., Kerr, H. D.. and Spicer, W. S., 
Jr. : Measurement of Upper and Lower Air- 
way' Resistance and Conductance in Man, /. 
Appl. Physiol., 19: 6, 1964 

Blide. R. W. : Obstructive Emphysema and 
Pulmonary Heart Disease, Maryland Med. J., 
September, 1964. 

Christiansox, C, Simpson, D. G., McClem- 
ENT, J., and Hubaytar. R. : In the Treatment 
of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci., March, 1965. 

Hubaytar, R., Christianson, C, Simpson, 
D. G., and McClement. J. : In the Treatment 
of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 
Ann. A'. Y. Acad. Sci., March, 1965. 

Kerr, H. D., Blide, R. W., and Spicer, W. S., 
Jr. : Measurement of Copper and Lower Air- 
way Resistance and Conductance in Man, /. 
Appl. Physiol.. 19: 6, 1964. 

Kerr, H. D., and Spicer. W. S., Jr. : Variation 
of Respiratory Function in Patients and 
Normal Subjects. Submitted for publication. 

Kowitz, T. a.: Editorial: Percutaneous Biopsy 
of tlie Parietal Pleura, Maryland Med. J., 
13: 63, 1964. 

McCle.ment, J., and Simpson, D. G. : Adrenal 
Corticosteroids in Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 
.4mer. Rev. Resp. Dis., November, 1964. 

McClement, J., Simpson, D. G., Christ- 
iansox, C, and Hubaytar, R. : In the Treat- 
ment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Dis- 
ease, .-Inn. N. )'. Acad. Sci., March, 1965. 

Morgan, W. K. C. : Bacillus Calmette Guerin, 
.Maryland Med. J., July, 1964. 

Morgan. W. K. C. : .\ Controlled Trial of 
Steroids in Obstructive Airway Disease, Ann. 
Intern. Med., .\ugust, 1964. 



Uol. .^7, .V,i. 3 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



MuKi'.AX, W. K. C. : Rheumatoid Pneumoconi- 
osis in Association witli Asbestosis, Thorax, 
September, 1964. 

Morgan, W. K. C. : Cbronic Obstructive Air- 
way Disease : Bacterial and Cellular Content 
of Sputum, Anii-riiaii Kri: A'l'j/'. Dis.. No- 
vember, 1 964. 

^^ORG.\^•. W. K. C. : The Englisli Disease, 
M<irYliiiui Mrd. J.. Marcli. 1"65. 

MoRG.\x. \V. K. C. : The Antibody Response 
to H. influenzae in Obstructive Airway 
Disease, Lancet. In press. 

Simpson, D. G., and McClemext. J. : Adrenal 
Corticosteroids in Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 
Aiiier. Rev. Rcsp. Dis., November, 1964. 

Simpson, D. G., McClement, J., and Christ- 
lAXsox, C, and Hub.wtar, R. : In the treat- 
ment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary 
Disease, Ann. X. V. Acad. Sci.. March, 1965. 

Spicer. W". S., Jr., Kerr, H. D., and Blide, 
R. W. : Measurement of Upper and Lower 
Airway Resistance and Conductance in Man, 
/. A/'pl. Physiol., 19: 6, 1964. 

Spicer. W. S., Jr. : Relation of Air Pollution to 
Disease, Arch. Em: Health, 9: 600, 1964. 

Spicer. \V. S., Jr.. and Kerr, H. D. : Variation 
of Respiratory Function in Patients and 
Xormal Subjects. Submitted for publication. 

DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY 

.\uDv. J. R.. X.\DCH.\TR.-\.M, M., LooMis, R., and 
Tr.wb. R. : Troinbicnla minor Berlese 
( .\carina. Trombiculidae). Designation of 
Xeotype with Larval and Post-larval Stages 
from Malayan Bats, and New Name, Myo- 
trombicida dilarami, for T. minor, Cooreman 
1960 ncc Berlese, 1905, Acarologia. . .: 1-34, 
illus., rets., 1965. In press. 

El Bat.\wi, Y., Hatgi, J. N., Eylar, O. R., 
HoLLJES, H. W. D., Rosexzweig, E. C, 
Wisseman, C. L., Jr., Noriega, A. R., and 
Wood, \\'. H., Jr. : Attenuated Living Vac- 
cines for Dengue Fever. II. Clinical and Im- 
munological Responses of Man to Infection 
with Four Attenuated Type I Dengue Virus 
Strains, 1965. In press. 

Evlar, O. R., Holljes. H. W. D., Rosexzweig, 
E. C, Wisse.man, C. L., Jr., Hatgi, J. N., 
El B.\tawi, Y.. Noriega, A. R., and Wood, 
'W. H., Jr. : Attenuated Living Vaccines for 
Dengue Fever. II. Clinical and Immunological 
Response of Man to Infection with Four 
Attenuated Type I Dengue Virus Strains, 
1965. In press. 



FiSET. Pall : Chapter on Serological Tech- 
ni(|ues. Techniques in Experimental Virology 
edited by R. J. C. Harris, Academic Press, 
London, November, 1964. 

Harrington, B. R., Rosenzweig, E. C, Wisse- 
man, C. L., Jr., Hatgi, J. N., and Kitaoka, 
M. : Immunological Studies with Group B 
.•\rthropod-borne Viruses. VI. Hemaggluti- 
nation-Inhibiting Antibody Responses to 17D 
Yellow Fever Vaccine in Human Subjects 
with Different Degrees of Complexity of Pre- 
vaccination Group B Virus Experience, 1965. 
In press. 

Hatgi. J. N., Wisseman, C. L., Jr., Rosen- 
zweig. E. C, Harrixgtox, B. R., and Kit.\- 
oka, M. : Immunological Studies with Group 
B .'\rthropod-borne Viruses. VI. Hemagglu- 
tination-Inhibiting Antibody Responses to 17D 
Yellow Fever Vaccine in Human Subjects 
with Different Degrees of Complexity of 
Prevaccination Group B Virus Experience, 
1965. In press. 

Hatgi, J. N., Eylar, O. R., Holljes, H. W. D., 
Rosenzweig, E. C, Wisseman, C. L., Jr., 
El Batawi, Y., Noriega A. R., and Wood, 
W. H., Jr. : Attenuated Living Vaccines for 
Dengue Fever. II. Clinical and Immunological 
Response of Man to Infection with Four At- 
tenuated Type I Dengue Virus Strains, 1965. 
In press. 

Holljes, H. W. D., Rosenzweig, E. C, Wisse- 
man, C. L., Jr., Evlar, O. R., Hatgi, J. N., 
El Batawi, Y., Noriega, A. R., and Wood, 
W. H., Jr. : Attenuated Living Vaccines for 
Dengue Fever. II. Clinical and Immunological 
Responses of Alan to Infection with Four 
Attenuated Type I Degree Virus Strains, 
1965. In press. 

Kitaoka, M., Harrington, B. R., Rosen- 
zweig, E. C, Wisseman, C. L., Jr., and 
Hatgi, J. N. : Immunological Studies with 
Group B Arthropod-borne Viruses. VI. Hem- 
agglutination-Inhibiting Antibody Responses 
to 17D Yellow Fever Vaccine in Human Sub- 
jects with Different Degrees of Complexity 
of Prevaccination Group B Virus Experience, 
1965. In press. 

Lakshana, p., and Traub, R. : Some Chiggers 
of the Subgenus Leptotrombidium from Thai- 
land, w-ith Descriptions of New Species 
(Acarina, Trombiculidae). /. Med. Ent., 
1965. In press. 

LooMis, R., Nadchatram, M., Audy, J. R., and 
Tr.aub, R. : Trombiciila minor Berlese (Acar- 



Jnly. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UXIVERSITV OF MARYLAND 



ina, Trombiculidae). Designation of Neotype 
with Larval and Post-larval Stages from 
Malayan Bats, and New Name, Myotrombi- 
cula dUarami, for T. minor, Cooreman 1960 
ncc Berlese, 1905. Acarologia : 1-34. 

illus., refs., 1965. In press. 

Nadchatram, M., and Traub, R. : New Species 
of Chiggers from Rodents in Laos (Acarina, 
Trombiculidae), /. Med. Ent.. 1: 65-72, illus., 
refs., 1964. 

Nadchatram, M., and Traub, R. : Three New 
Species of Leptobrobidiiim ( Lorillatum) from 
Southeast Asia (".^carina, Trombiculidae), 
/. Med. Ent., 1: 268-276, illus., refs., 1964. 

Nadchatram, M., and Traub. R. : A Revision 
of the Genus Chatia Brennan, with Synony- 
mic Notes and Descriptions of Two New 
Species from Pakistan (Acarina, Trombiculi- 
dae), 1965. In press. 

Nadchatram, M., Audy, J. R., Loomis. R. and 
Traub, R. : Tromhicula minor Berlese (Acar- 
ina, Trombiculidae). Designation of Xeotype 
with Larval and Post-larval Stages from 
Malayan Bats, and New Name, Myotrombi- 
ciila dUarami, for T. minor, Cooreman 1960 
ncc Berlese, 1905. Acarologia . . . . : 1-34. 
illus., refs., 1965. In press. 

Noriega, A. R., El Batawi. Y., Hatgi. J. X., 
Evlar, O. R.. Holltes. H. W. D., Rosex- 
ZWEIG. E. C, WissEMAX, C. L., Jr.. and 
Wood, W. H., Jr. : Attenuated Living \'ac- 
cines for Dengue Fever. II. Clinical Im- 
munological Responses of Man to Infection 
with Four Attenuated Type I Dengue \'irus 
Strains, 1965. In press. 

ROSENZWEIG, E. C, WiSSEMAN. C. L., Jr., 

Hatgi, J. N., Harrington, B. R., and Kita- 
OKA, M. : Immunological Studies with Group 
B. Arthropod-borne Viruses. VI. Hemaggluti- 
nation-Inhibiting .\ntibody Responses to 17D 
Yellow Fever ^'accine in Human Subjects 
with Different Degrees of Complexity of Pre- 
vaccination Group B \'irus Experience, 1965. 
In press. 

ROSENZWEIG. E. C, WiSSEMAX. C. L., Jr., 
HOLLJES, H. \V. D., EVLAK, O. R.. H.^TGI, 

J. N., El Batawi, Y., Noriega, A. R., and 
Wood, W. H., Jr. : Attenuated Living Vac- 
cines for Dengue Fever. II. Clinical and Im- 
munological Responses of Man to Infection 
with Four .Attenuated Type I Dengue Virus 
Strains, 1965. In press. 

Schultz, R. B., and Smith, A. G. : Observa- 
tions on the Disposition of Aspergillus Fumi- 



gatus in the Respiratory Tract, Aincr. J. Clin. 
Pa til.. 1965. In press. 

Smith. A. G., and Schultz, R. B. : Obser- 
vations on the Disposition of Aspergillus 
Fumigatus in the Respiratory Tract, Amcr. 
J. Clin. Path., 1965. In press. 

Tabor. H.. and Wisseman. C. L., Jr. : Inter- 
action of Rickettsiae and Phagocytic Host 
Cells. IV. Early Callular Response of Man 
to Typhus Rickettsiae as Revealed by the 
Skin Window Technique, with Observations 
on in I'i'c'o Phagocytosis, /. Iinniun.. 93: 
816-825, 1964. 

Traub, R. : .\ New Subgenus of Ophthal- 
niol^sylla from Gilgit, West Pakistan, and a 
New Hot>kinsil^sylla from Libya ( Siphonap- 
tera, Leptopsyllidae), /. Med. Ent.. 1965. In 
press. 

Tr.\ub. R. : Flea, article in Encycl. Brit., 9: 
431-432, 1964, Wm. Benton, Publisher, 
Chicago. 

Traub, R., and Nadchatram, M. : New Species 
of Chiggers from Rodents in Laos (Acarina, 
Trombiculidae), /. Med. Ent.. 1: 65-72, illus., 
refs., 1964. 

Traub, R., and Nadchatram. M. : Three New 
Species of Lcptotrombidium (Lorillatum) 
from Southeast Asia (Acarina, Trombiculi- 
dae). ./. Med. Ent.. 1: 268-276. illus.. refs., 
1964. 

Traub, R. : Some Opportunities and Problems 
in Medical Entomology in the Asian-Pacific 
Region. Dedication Symposiimi of Pauahi 
Hall, Bishop Museum, Pacific Insects, 7: 21- 
28, 1965. 

Traub. R., and Lakshaxa. P. : Some Chiggers 
of the Subgenus Leptotrombidiunt from Thai- 
land, with Descriptions of New Species 
(Acarina, Trombiculidae), /. Med. Ent., 1965. 
In press. 

Traub, R., and Xadch.\tram, M. : A Revision 
of the Genus Chatia Brennan, with Synonymic 
N^otes and Descriptions of Two Species from 
Pakistan (.\carina. Trombiculidae), 1965. 
In press. 

Traub. R., Loomis, R., Nadchatram. M. and 
Audv. J. R. : Tromhicula minor Berlese 
(Acarina. Trombiculidae). Designation of 
Neotype with Larval and Post-larval Stages 
from Malayan Bats, and New Name, Myo- 
tronddeula dilarami. for T. minor, Cooreman 
1960 nee Berlese, 1905. Acarologia . . .: 1-34, 
illus., refs.. 1965. In press. 



I'ol. .^;. .V-). 3 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



WissEMAX. C. L., Jk.. and Tabor, H. : Inter- 
action of Rickettsiae and Phagocytic Host 
Cells. IV. Early Cellular Response of Man 
to Typhus Rickettsiae as Revealed by the 
Skin Window Technique, with Oliservations 
on 1)1 I'iro Phagocytosis. /. liiitinm., 93: 
816-825. 1964. 

WisSE.MAX, C. L., Jr.: Typhus Fevers, Coitn. 
Current Therapy, pp. 64-66, 1%5. W. B. 
Saunders. Philadelphia. 

W'issF.MAX, C. L., Jr.: Ininiunization Against 
Epidemic Typhus with .Strain E : Recent 
Studies in the U. S. -\. Proc. 7th Inter- 
national Congresses on Tropical Medicine and 
Malaria, Vol. 3, pp. 284-285, 1964. 

W'issEMAx. C. L., Jr., Hatgi. J. X., Rosex- 
ZWEIG. E. C, Harrixgtox. B. R., and Kita- 
OKA. M. : Immunological Studies with Group 
B .Arthropod-borne Viruses. VI. Hemagglu- 
tination-Inhibiting .Antibody Responses to 17D 
Yellow Fever \'accine in Human Subjects 
with Different Degrees of Complexity of 
Prevaccination Group B \'irus Experience, 
1965. In press. 

WissEMAX. C. L., Jr., Rosexzweig, E. C, 
HoLLjES. H. W. D., Evlar, O. R., Hatgi, 
J. N., El Batawi, Y., Xoriega. A. R., and 
Wood, \\'. H., Jr. : Attenuated Living Vac- 
cines for Dengue Fever. II. Clinical and Im- 
munological Responses of Man to Infection 
with Four Attenuated Type I Dengue Virus 
Strains, 1965. In press. 
Wood, W. H., Jr., Noriega, A. R., El Batawi, 
Y., Hatgi, J. N., Eylar, G. R., Holljes, 
H. W. D., Rosenzweig, E. C, Wisseman, 
C. L., Jr. : Attenuated Living Vaccines for 
Dengue Fever. II. Clinical Immunological 
Responses of Man to Infection with Four 
Attenuated Type I Dengue \'irus Strains, 
1965. In press. 

DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY 

IAuREBECK, G., OsterberGj K., Blaw, M., Chou, 
S., and Nelson, E. : Electron Microscopic 
Studies on Metachromatic Leukocystrophy, 
Arch. Neurol, 11: 273, 1964. 
Baumgardxer, G., St.'Vuffer, J., Connor, T., 
and Heck. A. : Reversible Muscular Atrophy 
- in Hyperparathyroidism. (Paper given at 

I 16th Annual Meeting. American .Academy of 

» NeurologA', Denver, Colorado, April 28, 1964.) 

Neurology, 14: 256-257, 1964 (abstract). 
Blaw, M., Osterberg, K., .Aurebeck, G., Chou, 
S., and Xelsox. E. : Election ^licroscopic 



Studies on Metacliromatic Leukocystrophy. 
Arch. Neurol, 11: 273, 1964. 
Blaw, M., Osterberg, K., Kozak, P., and 
Nelson, E. : Sudanophilic Leukodystrophy 
and .Adrenal Cortical .Atrophy, Arch. Neurol., 
11: 626, 1964. 

Cacciano, v., Hall, V., and Heck, A.: An 
On-Line System for Recording Physiological 
Time Intervals, Aiiicr. J. Med. Electronics. 
In press. 

Chou, S., Blaw, M., Osterberg, K., Aure- 
beck, G., and Nelson, E, : Electron Micro- 
scopic Studies on Metachromatic Leukocystro- 
phy, Arch. Neurol., 11: 273, 1964. 

Cox.xoR, T., Heck, A., Stauffer, J., and Baum- 
G.-\RDXER, G. : Reversible Muscular Atrophy 
in Hyperparathyroidism. (Paper given at 
16th Annual Meeting, American Academy of 
X^eurology, Denver, Colorado, April 28, 1964.) 
Neurology, 14: 256-57, 1964 (abstract). 

Dahl, E., and Nelson, E. : Electron Micro- 
scopy of Human Intracranial Arteries, Arch. 
Neurol, 10: 158, 1964. 

Dahl, E., Flora, G., and X^elsox, E. : Ultra- 
structural Observations on X''ormaI Human 
Intracranial Arteries, Neurology, 15: 132, 
1965. 

Duffell, D., Hixz, R., and X^elsox, E. : Ultra- 
structural Observations on SV-40 Induced 
Gliomas in Hamsters, Amer. J. Path., 45: 59, 
1964. 

Flora, G., Dahl, E., and Xelsox, E. : Ultra- 
structural Observations on X''ormal Human 
Intracranial Arteries, Neurology. 15: 132, 
1965. 

Goulding, Monroe, Kramer, and Wise: EEG 
Activation of Patients Receiving Pheno- 
thiazines and/or Chloradizepoxide. Accepted 
for publication in /. Nerv. Ment. Dis. 

Greenbaum, Jr., L. J., and Merlis, J. K. : Ex- 
citability Cycles of Different Gyri of Cat 
Cortex, Electroenceph. Clin. Neurophysiol., 
18: 109-117, 1965. 

Hall, V., and Heck, A. : A Technique for 
Differential Photoelectric Plethysmography 
of Brain and Ear, /. Appl. Physiol, 19: 1236- 
1239, 1964. 

Hall, V., Caggiaxo, V., and Heck, A. : An 
On-Line System for Recording Physiological 
Time Intervals, Amer. J. Med. Electronics. 
In press. 

Heck, A., and Hall, V. : A Technique for 
Differential Photoelectric Plethysmography 



Julw 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. L'.MrERSITV OF MARYLAND 



of Brain and Ear, /. Appl. PhysioL, 19: 1236- 
1239, 1964. 

Heck, A. : A Study of Neural and Extraneural 
Findings in a Large Family with Friedreich's 
Ataxia, /. Neurol. Sci, 1: 226-255, 1964. 

Heck, A., Hall, V., and Caggiano, V. : An 
On-Line System for Recording Physiological 
Time Intervals, Amcr. J. Med. Electronics. 
In press. 

Heck, A., Connor, T., Stauffer, J., Baum- 
GARDNER, G. : Reversible Muscular Atrophy 
in Hyperparathyroidism. (Paper given at 
16th Annual Meeting, American Academy of 
Neurology, Denver, Colorado, April 28, 1964.) 
Neurology, 14: 256-257, 1964 (abstract). 

HiNZ, R., DuFFELL, D., and Nelson, E. : Ultra- 
structural Observations on SV-40 Induced 
Gliomas in Hampsters, Amcr. .L. Path., 45: 
59, 1964. 

KOZAK, P., OSTERBERG, K., Blaw, AL, and 
Nelson, E. : Sudanophilic Leukodystrophy 
and Adrenal Cortical Atrophy, Arch. Neurol, 
11: 626, 1964. 

Kramer, Monroe, Goulding and Wise: EEG 
Activation of Patients Receiving Phenothia- 
zines and/or Chloradiazepoxide. Accepted for 
publication in J. Ncrv. Ment. Dis. 

Merlis, J. K., and Greenbaum, Jr., L. J. : Ex- 
citability Cycles of Different Gyri of Cat 
Cortex, Elcctroenceph. Clin, Neuroj^hysiol.. 
18: 109-117, 1965. 

Merlis, J. K. : Excitability Cycle of the Direct 
Cortical Response Studies with Minimal 
Stimuli and Response Averaging, Electroen- 
ceph. Clin. Neurophysiol, 18: 118-123, 1965. 

Merlis, J. K. : Book Review: Electroencephal- 
ography in Hospital and General Consulting 
Practice ; An Introduction, J. Kugler, 
J.A.M.A., 189: 194, 1964. 

Merlis, J. K. : Book Review : Neurological and 
Electroencephalographic Correlative Studies 
in Infancy, P. Kellaway and I. Petersen. 
J. A.M. A., 191: 349, 1965. 

Merlis, J. K. : Book Review: Actualites Neu- 
rophysiologiques. Quatrieme serie, A. M. 
Monnier, P. Laget et A. Monnier, Electro- 
enceph. Clin. Neurophysiol, 18: 321, 1965. 

Monroe, Kramer, Goulding, and Wise: EEG 
Activation of Patients Receiving Phenothia- 
zines and/or Chloradizepoxide. Accepted for 
publication in /. Nerv. Ment. Dis. 

Nelson, E., and Dahl, E. : Electron Micro- 



scopy of Human Intracranial Arteries, Arch. 
Neurol., 10: 158, 1964. 

Nelson, E., Hinz, R., and Duffell, D. : Ultra- 
structural Observations on SV-40 Induced 
Gliomas in Hamsters, Aiiier. J. Path, 45: 59, 
1964. 

Nelsox, E., Chou, S., Blaw, M., Osterberg, 
K., and Aurebeck, G. : Electron Microscopic 
Studies on Metachromatic Leukocystrophy, 
Arch. Neurol, 11: 273, 1964. 

Nelson, E., Kozak, P., Osterberg, K., and 
Blaw, M. : Sudanophilic Leukodystrophy and 
Adrenal Cortical Atrophy, Arch. Neurol., 
11: 626, 1964. 

Nelson, E., Flora, G., and Dahl, E. : Ultra- 
structural Observations on Normal Human In- 
tracranial Arteries, Neurology, 15: 132, 1965. 

Oldstone, M. B. a. : Stethoscope Treachery, 
Nciv Engl. J. Med., 272: 107, 1965. 

Oldstone, M. B. A., Wood, W. H., and 
ScHULTZ, R. a.: Reevaluation of Blood Cul- 
ture as an Autopsy Procedure, Ainer. J. Clin. 
Path., 43: 241, 1965. 

Oldstone, M. B. A. : Hospital Acquired 
Staphylococcal Disease. 1. Air Borne Trans- 
mission. In press. 

Osterberg, K., Aurebeck, G., Blaw, M., Chou, 
S., and Nelson, E. : Electron Microscopic 
Studies on Metachromatic Leukocystrophy, 
Arch. Neurol., 11: 273, 1964. 

Osterberg. K., Blaw, M., Kozak, P., and 
Nelson, E. : Sudanophilic Leukodystrophy 
and Adrenal Cortical Atrophy, Arch. Neurol.. 
11: 626, 1964. 

ScHULTZ, R. A., Oldstone. M. B. A., and 
Wood, W. H. : Reevaluation of Blood Cul- 
ture as an Autopsy Procedure, Antcr. J. 
Clin. Path., 43: 241, 1965. 

Stauffer, J., Connor, T., Heck, A., and 
Baumgardner, G. : Reversible Muscular 
Atrophy in Hyperparathyroidism. (Paper 
given at 16th Annual Meeting, American 
Academy of Neurology, Denver, Colorado, 
April 28, 1964.) Neurology, 14: 256-57, 1964 
(abstract). 

Wise, Goulding, Monroe and Kramer: EEG 
Activation of Patients Receiving Phenothia- 
zines and/or Chloradizepoxide. Accepted for 
publication in .L Ncrv. Ment. Dis. 

Wood. W. H.. Oldstone, M. B. .\.. and 
ScHULTZ. R. .A. : Reevaluation of Blood Cul- 
ture as an .Autopsy Procedure, Amcr. J. Clin. 
43: 241. 1965. 



Vol. .^i. No. 3 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



i)ei'aktmp:nt of obstetrics 
am) (jvnecoi.ogy 

liKKiii. ^t. C, and Garcia. R. : Salmonella 

Infection in an Ovarian Dermoid Cyst in 

Pregnancy, Obstcl. Gyncc, 1964. 
CoHE.v, H., MoszKowsKi, E. F., and Haskixs. 

A. L. : Chiari-Frommel Syndrome, Aincr. J. 

Obstct. Gyncc, March 1, 1964. 
Co.\. E. F., Villa Santa. U., Ketciium. A. S., 

and MuxFORD. R. S.: Patient Evaluation for 

Pelvic Exenteration. Amcr. Surg.. September, 

1964. 
Garcia, R., and Breiji. M. C. : Salmonella 

Infection in an Ovarian Dermoid Cyst in 

Pregnancy, Obstct. Cyiicc, 1964. 
Garcia. R. : Histochemical Observations of 

Mucins in Human Ovarian Neoplasms, 

Cancer, 1964. 
Haskixs, a. L. : The Reproductive Behavior 

of the Adolescent Female, Bull. Sch. Med., 

Uniz'. Maryland, January, 1964. 
Haskixs. A. L., Moszkowski. E. F., and 

CoHE.x, H. : Chiari-Frommel Syndrome, 

Amer. Obstct. Gyncc., March 1, 1964. 

HaskiiXS, A. L., and Rimer, B. A. : The Hypo- 
gonadal State in the Prepuberal Female, 
Pacific Med. Surg., September-October, 1964. 

Haskixs, A. L. ; (Method of.) Leiomyoma 
(Fibroma of Uterus), Chapter: Current 
Therapy, 1964. 

Ketchum, a. S., Villa Santa, U., Cox, E. F., 
and MuxFORD, R. S. : Patient Evaluation for 
Pelvic Exenteration, Amer. Surg., Septem- 
ber, 1964. 

Moszkowski. E. F., Haskixs, A. L., and 
CoHEX, H. : Chiari-Frommel Syndrome, 
Amer. J. Obstct. Gyncc, March 1, 1964. 

MuxFORD, R. S., Ketchum, a. S., Villa 
S.\xta, U., and Cox. E. F. : Patient Evalua- 
tion for Pelvic Exenteration, Amer. Surg., 
September, 1964. 

Rimer, B. A., and Haskixs, A. L. : The Hypo- 
gonadal State in the Prepuberal Female, 
Pacific Med. Surg., September-October, 1964. 

ViLL.\ Sant.v. U. : Tumors of !Mesonepheric 
Origin in the Female Genital Tract, Amer. J. 
Obstct. Gyncc, July 1, 1964. 

Villa Saxta, U.. Cox, E. F., Ketchum, A. S., 
and MuxFORD. R. S. : Patient Evaluation for 
Pelvic Exenteration, Amer. Surg.. Septem- 
ber, 1964. 



DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Reeves, J. : Keratopathy .Associated with 
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Accepted 
Arch. Ophth. (Chicago). 

Vax Bijsterveld, O. P., and Richards, R. D. : 
Artificial Drainage Tubes for Glaucoma. Ac- 
cepted Amcr. J. Ophth. 

\'an Bijsterveld, O. P., and Richards, R. D. : 
Bacillus Infections of the Cornea. Accepted 
Arch. Ophth (Chicago). 

Richards, R. D., and Vax Bijsterveld, O. P.: 
.\rtificial Drainage Tubes for Glaucoma. Ac- 
cepted Amer. J. Ophth. 

Richards, R. D. : .Artificial Devices in Glau- 
coma Surgery. Accepted Eye Ear Nose Throat 
Monthly. 

Richards, R. D., and Vax Bijsterveld, O. P.: 
Bacillus Infections of the Cornea. Accepted 
Arch. Ophth. (Chicago). 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Arnold, J. G., Wagner, J. A., and Meyer, 
P. D. : Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Hema- 
toma — Unusual Complications of Hodgkin's 
Disease, Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, 
50: 45-48, 1965. 

AsPLEN, C. H., BoRGES, F. J., and Wood, C. : 
Acute Renal Failure After Oral Cholecysto- 
grapliy. Lancet, 2: 340-341, 1964. 

BoRGES. F. J., AsPLEN, C. H., and Wood, C. : 
Acute Renal Failure After Oral Cholecysto- 
graphy, Lancet, 2: 340-341, 1964. 

Goldstein-, M. N., Wagner, J. A., and Kiefer, 
L. : The Effects of Radiation In Utero on 
the Human Fetal Brain (Report of a Case), 
Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, 49: 56-61, 
1964. 

Heefner, W. a., Sorenson, G. D., and Kirk- 
p.\trick, J. B. : Experimental Amyloidosis 
II. Light and Electron Microscopic Observa- 
tions of Liver, Amcr. J. Path, 44: 629-644, 
1964. 

Heefner, W. A., Sorensox', G. D., and Kirk- 
patrick, J. B. : Experimental Amyloidosis, 
chapter in Methods and Achievements in E.v- 
perimental Pathology, Karger, A. G. Medical 
Publishers, Basel — -New York. 

Jordan, R., and Wagner^ J. A. : Eastern Equine 
Encephalitis, Amer. J. Trap. Med., 14: 470- 
474, 1965. 

KiEFER, L., Goldstein, M. N., and Wagner, 
J. A. : The Effects of Radiation In Utero on 



Julx, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNU'ERSITV OF MARYLAND 



tlie Human Fetal Brain (Report of a Case), 
Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland. 49: 56-61, 
1964. 

KiRKPATRiCK, J. B., Heefner, W. A., and 
SoRENSON, G. D. : Experimental Amyloidosis 
II. Light and Electron Microscopic Observa- 
tions of Liver, Amer. J. Path., 44: 629-644, 
1964. 

KiRKPATRicK, J. B., Heefner, W. A., and 
SoRENSON, G. D. : Experimental Amyloidosis, 
chapter in Methods and Achievements in E.v- 
jyerimental Pathology. Karger, A. G. Medical 
Publishers, Basel — New York. 

Light. J. P., and Oster, W. F. : A Study of 
the Clinical and Pathologic Reaction to the 
Bronchographic Agent Hytrast, Amer. J. 
Roentgen.. 92: 615-622, 1964. 

Meyer. P. D., Wagner. J. A., and Arnold. 
J. G. : Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Hema- 
toma — -"Dnusual Complications of Hodgkin's 
Disease, Bull. Seh. Med. Univ. Maryland. 
50: 4S-48, 1965. 

Novey. R., and Wisotzkey, H. M. : Spinal 
Fluid Cytodiagnosis of Central Nervous Sys- 
tem Malignancy (Preliminary Report), Bull. 
Seh. Med. Univ. Maryland. 49: 40-43, 1964. 

Oldstone, M., Wood. W. H., and Schultz, 
R. B. : A Re-evaluation of Blood Culture as 
an Autopsy Procedure, Amer. J. Clin. Path.. 
43: 241-247, 1965. 

Oster. W. F., and Light. J. P.: A Study of 
the Clinical and Pathologic Reaction to the 
Bronchographic Agent Hytrast, Amer. J. 
Roentgen, 92: 615-622, 1964. 

Passen, S., and Schultz. R. B. : Use of the 
Shope Papilloma \^irus-Induced Arginase as 
a Biochemical Marker in Vitro. I'irology. 26: 
122-126, 1965. 

Reuber, M. D. : Role of the Adrenal Glands 
in the Development of Lesions of the Liver 
in Rats Ingesting N-2-Fluorenyldiacetamide, 
/. A',7/. Cancer Inst.. 34: 587-594, 1965. 

Reuber, M.D. : Development of Preneoplastic 
and Neoplastic Lesions of the Liver in Male 
Rats Given 0.025 Percent N-2-Fluorenyldia- 
cetamide, /. Nat. Cancer Inst., 34: 697-723, 
1965. 

Schultz, R. B.. Oldstone. M., and Wood. 
W. H. : A Re-evaluation of Blood Culture 
as an Autopsy Procedure, Auicr. J. Clin. 
Path.. 43: 241-247, 1965. 

Schultz, R. B., and Passen, S. : L^se of the 



Shope Papilloma Virus-Induced Arginase as 
a Biochemical Marker in Vitro, I'irology, 
26: 122-126, 1965. 
Slavin, R. E., Wright. J. R., and Wagner, 
J. .\. : Intracranial Aneurysm as a Cause of 
Subdural Hematoma of the Posterior Fossa, 
/. Neurosurg., 22: 86-89, 1965. 

SoRENSON, G. D., Heefner. W. A., and Kirk- 
PATRicK. J. B. : Experimental Amyloidosis II. 
Light and Electron Microscopic Observations 
of Liver, Amer. .1 . Path.. 44: 629-644, 
1964. 

SoRENSON, G. D., Heefner. W. A., and Kirk- 
PATRicK. J. B. : Experimental Amyloidosis, 
chapter in Methods and Achievements in Ex- 
fierimcntal Pathology, Karger, A. G. Medical 
Publishers, Basel — New York. 

Wagner. J. A., Goldstein, M. N., and Kiefer, 
L. : Tlie Effects of Radiation In Utero of the 
Human Fetal Brain (Report of a Case), 
Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, 49: 56-61, 
1964. 

Wagner. J. A., Wright, J. R., and Slavin, 
R. E. : Intracranial Aneurysm as a Cause 
of Subdural Hematoma of the Posterior 
Fossa, /. Neurosurg.. 22: 86-89, 1965. 

Wagner. J. A., Meyer. P. D., and Arnold. 
J. G. : Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Hema- 
toma — L'nusual Complications of Hodgkin's 
Disease, Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland. 
50: 45-48, 1965. April 

\\'ai',ner. J. .-\., and Jordan. R. : Eastern Equine 
Encephalitis, Amer. .1. Trot>. Med.. 14: 470- 
474. 1965. 

Wisotzkey. H. M., and Novey. R. : Spinal 
Fluid Cytodiagnosis of Central Nervous 
System Malignancy ( Preliminary Report ) , 
Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland. 49: 40-43, 
1964. 

Wood, C. : Closed Renal Biopsy in Adults, Bull. 
Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland. 13: 61-62, 1964. 

Wood. C, Asplen. C. H., and Borges, J. J.: 
Acute Renal Failure After Oral Cholecysto- 
graphy, Lancet, 2: 340-341, 1964. 

Wood, W. H., Oldstone. M., and Schultz, 
R. B.: A Re-evaluation of Blood Cultures as 
an Autopsy Procedure. .4mer. J. Clin. Path.. 
43: 241-247. 1965. 

Wright, J. R., Wagner. J. A., and Slavin. 
R. E. : Intracranial .Aneurysm as a Cause of 
Subdural Hematoma of the Posterior Fossa, 
/. Neuro.uirg.. 22: 86-89, 1965. 



Vol. .^1. No. 3 



MF.niCAL SCHOOL SECTION 



DEl'AKTMENT OF I'EDIATRICS 

Bessma.v, S. p., and Good. T. A.: Determina- 
tion ol Glucosamine and Galactosamine Using 
Borate Buffers for Modification of Elson- 
Morgan and Morgan-Elson Reactions, .-Iiiti. 
liiocUcm. Exp. Med.. 9: 253, 196-1. 

Bessmax. S. p., Skolnik. S. J., McAslan, 
T. C. and Helrich, M. : Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology, 25: 771, 1964. 

BESsifAN, S. P., ToYODA, M., and DeSchepper, 
P. U. : A Requirement for Carbohydrate 
Metabolism for the Stinmlation of Amino Acid 
Incorporation into Protein by Insulin, /. Biol. 
Chem., 240: 5006, 1965. 

Bessmax, S. p., and Hammel, C. L. : The 
Control of Hemoglobin Synthesis by Oxygen 
Tension in a Cell-Free System, Arch. Bio- 
chcin.. 1955. In press. 

Bess-Nfax. S. p.: Phenylketonuria, Med. Sci., 
1965. In press. 

Bessmax, S. P. : The , Anesthetic Form of 
Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate in Brain. Ab- 
stracts Sixth International Congress of Bio- 
chemistry, New York City, July, 1964. 

Bessmax, S. P. and DeSchepper, P. J. : Glu- 
cose Requirement for Insulin Effect in Pro- 
tein Synthesis, Fed. Proc., 24: 576, 1965. 

Bessman, S. P., and Hammel, C. L. : Hemo- 
globin Synthesis in Avian Erythrocytes, /. 
Biol. Chem., 239: 2228, 1964. 

Bessmax, S. P., and Hammel, C. L. : The 
Kinetics of the Oxygen Control of Hemo- 
globin Synthesis, Arch. Biochcm., 110: 622, 
1965. 

Bradley, J. E. : Parents Acceptance of Mon- 
golism, Child & Family, 4: 55-62, 1964. 

Bradley, J. E. : Consultant's Comment, Curr. 
Med. Dig.. 32: 420, 1965. 

Bradley, J. E., and Frazier, T. : Blood Lead 
and Socio-economic Status. Submitted to 
Public Health Rep. 

Clemmens, R. L. : Obscure Causes of School 
Failure — A Pediatric Viewpoint, Bull. Orion 
Soc, 14: 32-39, 1964. 

Clemmexs, R. L., and Glaser, K. : School 
Failure, Pediatrics, 35: 128-141, 1965. 

Clemmens, R. I. : Minimal Brain Damage. 
Historical Perspectives in Mental Retardation 
During the Decade 1954-1964. U. S. Dcpt. 
Health Ediic. iVelfarc Child. Bur., 87-91, 
1964. 



Cross, E. R., and Gortex. M. K. : Iron 
Metabolism in Premature Infants II. Pre- 
vention of Iron Deficiency, /. Pediat., 64: 
509, 1964. 
DeSciiepper, p. J., Toyoda. M., and Bessman, 
S. P. : .\ Requirement for Carbohydrate Me- 
tabolism for the .Stimulation of Amino Acid 
Incorporation into Protein by Insulin, /. Biol. 
Chem.. 240: 5006, 1965. 
DeSciiepper. P. J., and Bessmax, S. P.: Glu- 
cose Requirement for Insulin Effect on Pro- 
tein Synthesis, Fed. Proc, 24: 576, 1965. 
Frazier, T., and Bradley, J. E. : Blood Lead 
and Socio-economic Status. Submitted to 
Public Health Rep. 
Glaser, K., and Clemmexs. R. L. : Scliool 

Failure, Pediatrics, 35: 128-141, 1965. 
Glaser, K. : Attempted Suicide in Children and 
Adolescents : Psychodynamic Observations, 
Amcr. J. Psychothcr., 19: 220-227, 1965. 
Glaser, K. : Suicide in Children and Adoles- 
cents. Acting Out: Theoretical and Clinical 
Aspects, S. L. Weissman, and L. E. Abt, 
editors. To be published in 1965 by Grune and 
Stratton, N. Y. 
Glaser, K. : Book Review : A History of the 
Care and Study of the Mentally Retarded by 
Leo Kanner. Amer. J. Psychothcr., 18: 538, 
1964 
Good. T. A., and Bessman, S. P. : Determina- 
tion of Glucosamine and Galactosamine Using 
Borate Buffers for Modfiication of Elson- 
Morgan and Morgan-EIson Reactions, Ann. 
Biochem. Exp. Med., 9: 253, 1964. 

Good, T. A., and Schulte, C. J. A.: Acute 
Methsuximide (Celontin) Intoxication. Sub- 
mitted to the /. Pediat. 

GoRTEN, M. K. : Detection of Xeonatal Jaundice, 
GP, 29: 101, 1964. 

i-GoRTEN, M. K. and Cross, E. R. : Iron 
Metabolism in Premature Infants II. Pre- 
vention of Iron Deficiency, /. Pediat., 64: 
509, 1964. 

GoRTEN, M. K., Hepner, R. and Workman, 
J. B. : Iron Metabolism in Premature Infants 
I. Absorption and Utilization of Iron as 
Measured by Isotope Studies, Blood, 23: 551, 
1964 (abstract). 

GoRTEN, M. K. : Utilization of Iron for Growth 
by Small Premature Infants, /. Pediat., 65: 
1130, 1964 (abstract). 

Gortex, M. K. : Detection of Xeonatal Jaundice, 
Mod. Med., 32: 136, 1964. 



July. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GoRTEN, M. K., and Hefner, R. : Iron Balance 
. in Small Premature Infants, Southern Med. 
J., 57: 1462, 1964. 

GoRTEN, M. K. : Iron Metabolism in Premature 

Infants III. Utilization of Iron as Related 

. to Growth in Low Birth Weight Infants, 

. Amer. J . Clin. Ntitr. In press. 

Hammel, C. L., and Bessman, S. P. : The 
Control of Hemoglobin Synthesis by Oxygen 
Tension in a Cell-Free System, Arch. Bio- 
chem., 1965. In press. 

Hammel, C. L., and Bessman, S. P. : Hemo- 

. globin Synthesis in Avian Erythrocytes, /. 
Biol. Ghent., 239: 2228, 1964. 

Hammel, C. L., and Bessman, S. P. : The 
Kinetics of the Oxygen Control of Hemo- 
globin Synthesis, Arch. Biochem., 110: 622, 
1965. 

Helrich, M., McAslan, T. C, Skolnik, S. J., 
and Bessman, S. P. : Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology, 25: 771, 1964. 

Hepner, R., Gorten, M. K., and Workman. 

• J. B. : Iron Metabolism in Premature Infants 
I. Absorption and LItilization of Iron as 
Measured by Isotope Studies. Blood. 23: 551, 
1964 (abstract). 

Hefner, R., and Gorten, J. K. : Iron Balance 
in Small Premature Infants, Southern Med. 
J.. 57: 1462, 1964. 

Hefner, W. R. : Revision of Care of the 
Premature, Current Therapy, edited by Conn. 

Lentz, G. a., Jr. : Lead article for UCP of 
Baltimore publication, 53 Minutes. 

McAslan, T. C, Helrich, M., Skolnik, S. J., 
and Bessman, S. P. : Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology, 25: 771, 1964. 

Patron, L., and Walker, S. H. : Unclassi- 
fied Mycobacterial Infections in Children, 
Amcr. Dis. Child., Nov., 1964. 

Patron. L., and Walker. S. H. : Colistin 
Therapy in Infants and Children, Amer. J. 
Dis. Child., March, 1965. 

Rubenstein, H. J., and Weaver, K. H. : 
Monozygotic Twins Concordant for Ven- 
tricular Septal Defect, Anicr. J. Cardiol., 

. 15: 386, 1965. 

ScHERLis, Sidnev : Stress, Trauma and Heart 
Disease. Cardiac Section, Cyclof>cdia of Medi- 
cine. F. A. Davis Co., Philadelphia, June, 
1965. 



ScHULTE, C. J. A., and Good, T. A.: Acute 
Methsu.ximide (Celontin) Intoxication. Sub- 
mitted to the /. Pcdiat. 

Skolnik, S. J., McAslan, T. C, Helrich, M., 
and Bessman, S. P. : Correlation of Blood 
Levels of 4-Hydroxybutyrate with State of 
Consciousness, Anesthesiology, 25: 771, 1964. 

Toyoda, M., DeSchepper, P. U., and Bessman, 
S. P. : A Requirement for Carbohydrate 
Metabolism for the Stimulation of Amino 
Acid Incorporation into Protein by Insulin, 
/. Biol. Chem., 240: 5006, 1965. 

Walker, S. H., and Patron, L. : Unclassified 
Mycobacterial Infections in Children, Amer. 
J. Dis. Child., Nov., 1964. 

Walker, S. H., and Patron, L. : Colistin 
Therapy in Infants and Children, Anicr. J. 
Dis. Child., March, 1965. 

Weaver, K. H. : The Heart and Acute Glomer- 
ulonephritis, Maryland Med. J., 13: 131, 1964. 

Weaver, K. H., and Rubenstein, H. J. : Mono- 
zygotic Twins Concordant for Ventricular 
Septal Defect. Amer. J. Cardiol, 15: 386, 
1965. 

Workman, J. B., Hepner. R., and Gortex. 
M. K. : Iron Metabolism in Premature In- 
fants I. Absorption and L'tilization of Iron as 
Measured by Isotope Studies, Blood, 23: 551, 
1964 (abstract). 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

Blake, D. .•\., and Rozma.v, R. S. : Metabolism 
of Fluoromar-C'' in Mice, Fed. Proc.. 24: 
269, 1965. 

Bruade, Monique C, and Krantz, J. C, Jr. : 
Toxicity and Convulsive Activity of a Series 
of Theophylline Derivatives, To.ric. Apfl. 
Pharmacol., 7: March, 1965. 

Bruade, Monique C, and Krantz, J. C, Jr.: 
Toxicity and Convulsive Activity of a Series 
of Theophylline Derivatives, To.xic. Appl. 
Pharmacol., 7: March, 1965. 

Bruade, Monique C, and Krantz, J. C, Jr. : 
Rationale of the Use of Fluorinated Hydro- 
carbons and Ethers as Volatile Anesthetic 
Agents, Anesth. Analg., 44: May-June 1965. 

Brliade, Monique C, and Krantz, J. C, Jr.: 
The New Law : Drugs, Drug Houses and 
Drug Officials, Milit. Med. 

Bltrgison, R. M. : Cancer Research Supple- 
ment: Vol. 24, No. 6 (July, 1964), pp. 963, 
990-991, 1000; Vol. 24, No. 3 (April. 1964), 
pp. 558-559; 633-634; Vol. 24, No. 11 ( De- 



;•<>/. 51. No. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



cembcr. 1964). pp. 1112. Vol. 25, No. 1 
(January, 1965), pp. 146-147; 152; 164-165. 

C.\RR, C. J., and Kraxtz, J. C, Jr. : Pharma- 
cologic Principles of Medical Practice, 6th 
Ed.. 1965. Williams and Wilkins Co., Balti- 
more. 

C.\scoRBi, H. F., RuDO, F. G. : The Anesthetic 
Index and the Potency of Volatile Anesthetics, 
Aiieslh. Analg., 43: iZi, 1964. 

C.\scoRBi, H. F., RuDO, F. G. : The Potency of 
Methoxyflurane and Halothane, Ancsth. 
Analg., 43: 163, 1964. 

Davisox, C, and Rozm.vx. R. S. : Studies on the 
Reachion Products of Bis-B-Chloroethyl Sul- 
fide-S'*-' with Cellular Polynucleotides and 
Xucleic Acid Bases, Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. 
Maryland, 50: 5, 1965. 

DuRiTZ, G., and Truitt, E. B., Jr. : A Rapid 
Method for the Simultaneous Determination 
of Acetaldehyde and Ethanol in Blood using 
Gas Chroniatograph}', Quart. J. Stud. Alcohol, 
25: 498-510, 1964. 

DcRiTZ, G., and Truitt, E. E., Jr. : The Role 
of Acetaldehyde in the Actions of Ethanol in 
Biochemical Factors in Alcoholism by R. P. 
Maickel and Brodie, editors, Pergamon Press, 
X. V. 

Alternate Glycolytic Pathways in Brain : A 
Comparison Between the Action of Artificial 
Electron Acceptors and Electrical Stimulation. 
J. J. O'Neill. 

A Technique for the Study of Electrically 
Stimulated Tissue with 14C — labelled Sub- 
strates. J. J. O'Neill. 

Kraxtz, J. C, Jr., Terrell, R., Rozm-an, R. S. : 
Anesthesia LXVII : Indoklon, a New Psychi- 
atric Drug, and Its Sulfur Analog, Bull. 
Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, 49: 36 (1964). 

Kr.vxtz, J. C., Jr., and RuDo, F. G. : Chapter 12, 
Fluorinated Anesthetics for Hefter-Heuber 
Handbuch. 

Kraxtz, J. C, Jr., and Rudo, F. G. : Experi- 
mentellen Pharmakologie — Pharmacology of 
Fluorine edited by Frank A. Smith 1965. In 
press. 

Kraxtz, J. C, Jr., and Rudo, F. G. : The 
Laboratory Animal and New Drugs, Bull. 
Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, 49: Jan., 1964. 

Kraxtz, J. C, Jr., and Rudo, F. G. : The 
Pharmacology of Tranquilizing Agents, /. 
Kcuropsychiat., 5 : 

Kraxtz, J. C, Jr., and Carr, C. J. : Pharma- 
cologic Principles of Medical Practice, 6th Ed., 
1965. Wlliams and Wilkins Co., Baltimore. 



Morgax, a. M., and Truitt, E. B. : Gastro- 
intestinal Factors in Aspirin .Absorption, /. 
Pharm. Sci., 53: 129-134, 1964. 

Morgan, A. M., and Truitt, E. B., Jr.: Evalua- 
tion of .Acetylsalicylic Acid Esterase in 
Aspirin Metabolism. An Interspecies Com- 
parison. Submitted for pulilication Biochem. 
Pharmacol.. 1965. 

Mlsseh, R. O., and Shuukagel, E. : (.Assisting 
in the preparation of the manuscript) : 
Modern Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 3rd 
Ed.. Macmillan, New York. In press. 

Needlemax, Philip, and Kraxtz, J. C, Jr.: 
The Biotransformation of Nitroglycerin, 
Biochem. Pharmacol., 14: 1965. In press. 

RozMAX, R. S., Terrell, R., and Kraxtz, J. C, 
Jr. : Anesthesia LXVII : Indoklon, a New 
Psychiatric Drug, and its Sulfur Analog, 
Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, 49: 36, 
1964. 

Roz.MAX, R. S. : The ResiJonsc of the Hema- 
topoietic System to Drugs. Chap. 45, Pharma- 
cologic Principles of Medical Practice, 6th 
Ed., by J. C. Krantz, Jr., and C. J. Carr, 
Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, 1965. 

RozMAN, R. S., and Blake, D. A.: Metabolism 
of Fluoromar-Ci-* in Mice, Fed. Proc, 24: 
269, 1965. 

RozMAN, R. S., and Davisox-, C. : Studies on 
the Reaction Products of Bis-B-Chloroethyl 
Sulfide-S^^ w'ith Cellular Polynucleotides and 
Nucleic Acid Bases, Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. 
Maryland, 50: 5, 1965. 

Rudo. F. G., and Cascorbi. H. F. : The Anes- 
thetic Index and the Potency of Volatile 
Anesthetics, Anesth. Analg., 43: 333, 1964. 

Rudo, F. G., and Cascorbi, H. F. : The Potency 
of Methoxyflurane and Halothane, Anesth. 
Analg., 43: 163, 1964. 

Rudo, F. G., and Krantz, J. C. Jr. : The Labo- 
ratory Animal and New Drugs, Bull. Sch. 
Med. Univ. Maryland, 49: Jan., 1964. 

Shubkagel, E., and Musser, R. D. : (Assisting 
in the preparation of the manuscript) : 
Modern Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 3rd 
Ed., Macmillan, New York. In press. 

Terrell, R., Rozman, R. S., and Krantz, J. C, 
Jr. : Anesthesia LXVII : Indoklon, a New 
Psychiatric Drug, and its Sulfur Analog, 
Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, 49: 36, 1964. 

Truitt, E. B., and Morgan, A. M. : Gastro- 
intestinal Factors in Aspirin Absorption, /. 
Pharm. Sci., 53: 129-134, 1964. 



July, 1966 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. VXIi-ERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Truitt, E. B.. Jr., and Duritz, G. : A Rapid 
Method for the Simultaneous Determination 
of Acetaldehyde and Ethanol in Blood Using 
Gas Chromatography, Quart. J. Stud. Alco- 
hol, 25: 498-510, 1964. 

Truitt, E. B., Jr.: The Xanthines. Chap. 28, 
PJianmicology in Medicine. J. R. DiPalma, 
editor. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1965. 

Truitt, E. B., Jr., and Morgan, A. M. : Evalu- 
ation of Acetylsalicylic Acid Esterase in 
Aspirin Metabolism. An Interspecies Com- 
parison. Submitted for publication Biochcin. 
Pharmacol.. 1965. 

Tkuitt. E. B., Jr.. and Duritz, G. : The Role 
of Acetaldehyde in the Actions of Ethanol in 
Biochemical Factors in Alcoholism by R. P. 
Maickel, and Brodie, editors, Pergamon 
Press, N. Y. 

Alternate Glycolytic Pathways in Brain : A 
Comparison Between the Action of Artificial 
Electron Acceptors and Electrical Stimula- 
tion. J. J. O'Neill. 

A Technique for the Study of Electrically 
Stimulated Tissue with 14C — Labeled Sub- 
strates. J.J. O'Neill. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Adelman, W. J., Jr., and Fok, Y. B. : Internally 
Perfused Squid Axons Studied Under Volt- 
age Clamp Conditions, I. Method. /. Cell. 
Comp. Physiol., 64: 423-428, 1964. 

Adelman, W. J., Jr., Dyro, F. M., and Senft, 
J. : Long Duration Responses Obtained from 
Internally Perfused Axons, /. Gen. Physiol., 
48: 1-9, 1965. 

Adelman, W. J., Jr. : Bioelectricity, Encyclo- 
pedia of Science and Technology, 1965 Year- 
book, McGraw-Hill, New York. 

Adelmax, \V. J., Jr., and Dyro, F. M. : Re- 
lation of Hyperpolarizing Response to Po- 
tassium Conductance in Internally Perfused 
Squid Axons, Bio. Bull., 127: 361, 1964. 

Adelman, W. J., Jr., Dyro, F. M., and Senft, 
J. : Spontaneous Cardiac-Like Repetitive Re- 
sponses from Internally Perfused Squid 
Axons, Biophys. Soc. Abs., 9th Annual Meet- 
ing, WB5, 1965. 

Adelman. \\\ J., Jr., Senft, J., and Dyro. 
F, M. : Long Duration Action Potentials from 
the Internally Perfused Squid Axon, Fed. 
I'roc. 24: 584, 1965. 

Adelman, W. J., and Taylor, R. E. : Effects 
of Replacement of External Sodium Chloride 
with Sucrose on Membrane Currents of the 



Squid Giant Axon, Biopliys. /.. 4: 451-463, 
1964. 

Adelman, W. J., Jr. and Gilbert, D. L. : 
Internally Perfused Squid Axons Studied 
Under Voltage Clamp Conditions. I. Method, 
/. Cell. Comp. Physiol., 64: 423-428, 1964. 

Barraclough, C. a., Yrarrazaval, S., and 
Hatton, R. : A Possible Hypothalamic Site 
of Action of Progesterone in the Facilitation 
of Ovulation in the Rat, Endocrinol., 75: 838, 
1964. 

Barraclough. C. A.: Modifications in Repro- 
ductive Function after Exposure to Hor- 
mones during the Pre- and Early Postnatal 
Period. Chapter 19 in Neuroendoerinology. 
edited by W. Ganong and L. Martini, Aca- 
demic Press, N. Y., 1965. 

Blake, 'W'. D., and Jurf, A. M. : Denervation 
Diuresis on Free Water Reabsorption in Dog 
and Rabbit, Fed. Proc., 24: 642, 1965. 

Dyro, F. M., Adelman, W. J., Jr., and Senft, 
J. : Long Duration Responses Obtained from 
Internally Perfused Axons, /. Gen. Physiol., 
48: 1-9, 1965. 

Dyro, F. M., and Adelman, 'W. J., Jr. : Re- 
lation of Hyperpolarizing Response to Po- 
tassium Conductance in Internally Perfused 
Squid Axons, Biol. Bull., 127: 361, 1964. 

Dyro, F. M., Adelman, W. J., Jr., and Senft. 
J. : Spontaneous Cardiac-Like Repetitive Re- 
sponses from Internally Perfused Squid 
Axons, Biophys. Soc. Abs., 9th Annual Meet- 
ing, ■WB5, 1965. 

Dyro, F. M., Adelman, W. J., Jr., and Senft, 
J. : Long Duration Action Potentials from the 
Internally Perfused Squid Axon, Fed.. Proc., 
24: 584,1965. 

Fok, Y. B., and Adelman. W. J., Jr.: In- 
ternally Perfused Squid Axons Studies Under 
Voltage Clamp Conditions. I. Method, /. 
Cell. Comp. Physiol., 64: 423-428, 1964. 

Gilbert. D. L., and Adelman, W. J., Jr. : In- 
ternally Perfused Squid Axons Studied 
LInder Voltage Clamp Conditions. I. Method, 
/. Cell. Comp. Physiol., 64: 423-428, 1964. 

Glaser, E. M., and Van der Loos : A Senii- 
Automatic Computer Microscope for the 
Analysis of Neurone Morphology, I.E.E.E. 
Trans, on Biomed. Eng., BME. 12: 22-31, 
1965. 

Glaser, E. M. : Stimulator for Complex Acous- 
tic 'Waveforms, J. Acoust. Soc. Anier., 36: 
1288-1291, 1964. 



/■<)/. 51, Xo. 3 



MEniCAI. SCHOOL SECTION 



IIattax. R.. Vakrazaval. S.. and Bakra- 
L LOUGH. C. A.: A Possible Hypothalamic Site 
of Action of Progesterone in the Facilitation 
of Oviilation in the Rat, IliidocriiioL. 75: 838, 
1964. 

JiRF. A. X.. and Blake. W'. D. : Denervation 
Diuresis on Free Water Keabsorption in Dog 
and Rabbit. Fed. Proc. 24: 642. 1965. 

PiXTER. G. (i., and Siiohet. J. I,.; Derivation 
of Partial Differential Equations Utilized in 
a Model Describing the Xa Concentration 
Profile in the Renal Medulla, Xaliirr. 204: 
689-690, 1964. 

Pinter, G. G. : Distribution of F^l Albumin 
and P-' Chyloniicra in Renal Tissue. Pro- 
ceedings of the International Symposium on 
the Preparation and Bio-Medical Application 
of Labeled Molecules, Venice, 1964 ; Euratom, 
1965. 

Sexft. J. DvRO. F. M., and Adelmax, W. J., 
Jr. : Long Duration Responses Obtained from 
Internally Perfused Axons, /. Gen. Physiol., 
58: 1-9, 1965, part 2. 

Sexft, J., Dvro. F. M., and Adeljian, W. J., 
Jr. : Spontaneous Cardiac-Like Repetitive Re- 
sponses from Internally Perfused Squid 
Axons, Biophys. Soc. Abs., 9th Annual fleet- 
ing, WB5, 1965. 

Sexft, J., Adelmax, W. J., Jr., and Dyro, 
F. M. : Long Duration Action Potentials from 
the Internally Perfused Squid Axon, Fed. 
Proc., 24: 584, 1965. 

Shohet, J. L., and Pinter, G. G. : Derivation 
of Partial Differential Equations Utilized in 
a ^Model Describing the X'a Concentration 
Profile in the Renal Medulla, Xatiirc, 204: 
689-690, 1964. 

Taylor, R. E., and Adelmax, W. J. : Effects 
of Replacement of External Sodium Chloride 
with Sucrose on Membrane Currents of the 
Squid Giant Axon, Biof<hys. J.. 4: 451-463, 
1964. 

^'AN DER Loos, and Glaser, E. M. : A Semi- 
Automatic Computer Microscope for the 
Analysis of Neurone Morphology, I.E.E.E. 
Trans, on Biomed. Eng., BME, 12: 22-31, 
1965. 

Yrarraz.wal, S., Barraclough, C. a., and 
Hattox, R. : A Possible Hypothalamic Site 
of Action of Progesterone in the Facilitation 
of Ovulation in the Rat, Endocrinol., 75: 838, 
1964. 



DEPARTMENT OF PREVENTIVE 
MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION 

Bartiiel. D. W., and Maiioxey, F. I.: The 
Barthel Index, Maryland Med. /., Feb., 1965. 

ExTwisLE. G., and Reinke, W. A.: Statistical 
h'valuation of Medical Information, Bull. 
Srh. .!/,■</. Uiiiz: Maryland, 50: 32, .\pril, 
1965. 

Jaxer. J. L., Vazquez, J., Paniacus, M. E., 
and Tavtabak, J.: Medical and Psychological 
Sequelae of Surgical Sterilization of Women, 
Awcr. J. Obstct. Gyncc, 90: 4, 1964. 

Mahoney, F. L, and Bartiiel, D. W. : The 
Barthel Index, Maryland Med. J., Feb., 1965. 

Mahoxev, F. I. : Dr. Maboney's pamphlet, 
U/' and Around, published last year by the 
U. S. Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare, has been reproduced in a smaller 
size by the American Heart Association. 

Paniacus, M. E., Taytabk, J., Janer, J. L., 
and Vazquez, J. : Medical and Psychological 
Sequelae of Surgical Sterilization of Women, 
Amer. J. Obstet Gyncc, 90: 4, 1964. 

Reinke, W. A., and Entwisle, G. : Statistical 
Evaluation of Medical Information, Bull. Sch. 
Med. Univ. Maryland, 50: 32, 1965. 

Richardson, P. F. : Problems in Rehabilitation, 
Maryland Med. J., October, 1964. 

Richardson, P. F. : Physical Therapy in 
Medical Practice, Maryland Med. J., June, 
1965. 

Taytabk, J., Janer, J. L., Vazquez, J., and 
Paniagus, M. E. : Medical and Psychological 
Sequelae of Surgical Sterilization of Women, 
Amer. J. Obstet. Gynec., 90: 4, 964. 

Vazquez, J., Paniacus, M. E., Taytabk, J., 
and Janer, J. L. : Medical and Psychological 
Sequelae of Surgical Sterilization of Women, 
Amer. J. Obstet. Gynec., 90: 4, 1964. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY 

Ames, L. L., and Findley, J. D. : A Note on 
Time Out from Avoidance with the Chim- 
panzee, /. Exp. Anal. Behav., 1965. In press. 

Aronson, H., and Overall, B.: Treatment 
Expectations of Patients in Two Social 
Classes. In press. 

Aronson, H., and 0\'erall, B. : Expectations 
of Psychotherapy in Patients of Lower Socio- 
economic Class, reprinted in Mental Health 
of the Poor, edited by Riessman, Cohen, and 



Juh, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. VNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Pearl, the Free Press of Glencoe, Collier- 
Macmillan Ltd., London, 1964. 

Aronson, H., and Weintraub, W. : The Appli- 
cation of Verbal Behavior Analysis to the 
Study of Psychological Defense Mechanisms. 
II : Speech Pattern Associated with Im- 
pulsive Behavior, /. Nerv. Mcnt. Dis., 139: 
July, 1964. 

Aronson, H., and Weintraub, W. : The Appli- 
cation of Verbal Behavior Analysis to the 
Study of Psychological Defense Mechanisms. 
Ill : Speech Pattern Associated with De- 
lusional Behavior. Accepted for publication. 

Aronson, H., and Young, I. : Treatment Ex- 
pectations of Patients in Two Social Classes, 
/. of Social Work. In press. 

Bahn, a., Gorwitz, K., Klee. G. D., Kramer, 
M., and Tuerk, I. : Psychiatric Services Re- 
ceived by Residents of an Entire State Dur- 
ing a One Year Period (Maryland Psychiatric 
Case Register : Analysis of the First Year's 
Experience), Public Health Rep. In press. 

Baldwin, R., Mackie, J. B., and Kexxv, T. : 
Incidence of Minimal Brain Injury in 
Adopted Children, Maryland J. Med. In press. 

Balis, G. U., and Monroe, R. R. : The Pharma- 
cology of Chloralose : A Review, Psycho- 
pharmacologia (Berlin), 6: 1-30, 1964. 

Bass, B., and Motchar, J. : Experiences in 
Group Counselling with Aging Men in an 
Out-patient Setting, Geriatrics. 

Beck, H. C, and Mackie, J. B. : Personality 
Organization and Brain Damage, Psychiat. 
Spectator, 1: Sept. 1964. 

Beck, H. C, and Mackie, J. B. : Age, Intelli- 
gence and CFF, Psychomotor Skills. In press. 

BowEN, M. : Intrafamily Dynamics in Emotional 
Illness, chapter in Family, Church, and Com- 
munity, edited by A. D'Agostino, M.D., P. J. 
Kennedy and Sons, New York, March, 1965. 

BowEN, M. : Family Psychotherapy in the 
Hospital and in Private Practice, chapter in 
Intensive Family Therapy, edited by Nagy 
and Framo, Harper and Row, New York, 
May, 1965. 

BowEN, M. : Theoretical Rationale of Family 
Psychotherapy, presented at a Symposium of 
Family Psychotherapy, Marquette University. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October, 1964. (In 
press as a chapter in a book containing the 
papers from the Marquette Symposium to be 
published by Science and Behavior Books, 
Inc.) 



BowEN, M. : The Family as a LTnitary Psycho- 
logical System, presented at a Family Sym- 
posium, Group for the Advancement of Psy- 
chiatry, Philadelphia, April 19, 1964. (In 
press as a GAP publication.) 

Brady, J. V., and Findley, J. D. : Facilitation 
of Large Fi.xed-Ratio Performance by L'se 
of Conditioned Reinforcement, /. E.vp. Anal. 
Behav., 8: 1964. 

Braude, M. C, and Kraxtz, J. C, Jr. : Toxicity 
and Convulsive Activity of a Series of Theo- 
phylline Derivatives, Toxic. Appl. Pharmacol., 
7: 291-300, 1965. 

Braude, M. C, and Monroe, R. R. : Neuro- and 
Psychopharmacologic Studies of Alphaglu- 
cochloralose ( AGC) and Dimethylsulfoxide 
(IMSO), Fed. Proc, 24: 390, 1965. 

Braude, M. C, and Monroe, R. R. : Dimethyl- 
sulfoxide : Solubilizing and Interactive 
Effects with Alphaglucochloralose. In press. 

Brody, E. B. : The Clinical Nurse Specialist in 
Nursing Administration, /. Psychiat. Nurs., 
June, 1964. 

Brodv, E. B. : Some Conceptual and Methodo- 
logical Issues Involved in Research on Society, 
Culture and Mental Illness, /. Nerv. Mcnt. 
Dis., 139: 62-74, 1964. 

Brody, E. B. : Summary and Charge. Proceed- 
ing, Maryland Conference on Mental Health, 
Fall, 1964. Published April, 1965. 

Brody, E. B. ; Treatment of an Adult Thumb- 
sucker : In Column on Clinical Advise, 
J.A.M.A., 189: 971, 1964. 

Brody, E. B. : Book Review : Segregation and 
Mental Health, edited by M. Grossack, 
Springer, New York, 1963, Psychiatry, 28: 
196-197, 1965. 

Brody, E. P. : Psychiatry and the Social Order, 
Anter. J. Psychiat. In press. 

Brody, E. B. : Psychiatry and Prejudice, 
chapter in American Handbook of Psychiatry, 
Supplement, edited by S. Arieti. In press. 

Brody, E. B. : Staffing Patterns, chapter in 
The Future of Psychiatry, edited by M. Kauf- 
man, International University Press. In press. 

Brody, E. B. : Book Review : The Universal 
Experience of Adolescence, edited by N. Kiel], 
International L'niversity Press, New York, 
1964, ./. Nerz: Ment. Dis. In press. 

Brody, E. B. : Book Review : The Psychoana- 
lytic Study of the Child, Vol. XVIII, Inter- 
national University Press, New York, 1964, 
/. A'erv. Mcnt. Dis. In press. 



Vol. .^i. No. 3 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



Browx, G. p.: The Pctliatrician ami Psyclioso- 
iiiatic Medicine, /. .Vu/. Mcil. Ass.. 57: 
143, 1965. 

liKowN, R., ScHLEiFER. C. B., and Derbyshire, 
R. : Symptoms and Symptom Change in 
Hospitalized Negro and White Mental 
I'atients, /. Human Behavior. In press. 

L'l KMMENS, R. L. : Obscnre Causes of School 
Failure — A Pediatric Viewpoint, Bull. Orton 
Soc, 14: 32-39, 1964. 

Ci.K.MMENS, R. L., and Glaser, K. : School 
I'ailure, Pediatrics. 35: 128-141, 1965. 

Cr.EMMF.N?. R. L. : Minimal Brain Damage, 
chapter in Historical Perspectives in Mental 
Retardation During the Decade 1954-1964, 
U. S. Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare, Children's Bureau, 87-91, 1964. 

CnNXOK. T. B., LovicE. H., HuFFER, V., and 
.^coTT. W. H. : Psychological Studies of 
.\dult Male Patients with Sexual Infantilism 
Before and After Androgen Therapy, Ann. 
Intern. Med.. 255-368, 1964 
.\ddendum to above article appearing as Letter 
to the Editor, Ann. Intern. Med., Dec, 1964. 
Book Review : Psychobiological Approaches 
to Social Behavior, by P. H. Leiderman and 
D. Shapiro, Stanford University Press, Curr. 
Med. Dig., 32: 398, 1965. 

I)ALE. R., and Monroe, R. R. : Chlordiozepo.x- 
ide in the Treatment of Patients W'ith Acti- 
vated EEG's. In press. 

Derbyshire, R. L. : The Uncompleted American 
Xegro Family, /. Human Relations, 1965. 
In press. 

Derbyshire, R. L. ; United States Negro 
Identity Conflict, Int. J. Soc. Psychiat., 1965. 
In press. 

Derbyshire, R. L. : The Social Control Role 
of the Police in Urban Racial Conflict, Mary- 
land Magazine, 1965. In Press. 

Derbyshire, R. L., Schleifer, C. B., and 
Brow.x, R. : Symptoms and Symptom Change 
in Hospitalized Negro and White Mental 
Patients, /. Human Behav. In press. 

Derbyshire, R. L., Schleifer, C. B., and 
Browx, R. : Desegregation of a State Mental 
Hospital for Negroes : A Study of StaflF 
Attitudes, Amcr. J. Psychiat., 121: April, 
1965. 

Eichler, M. : Book Review : Drugs in Psycho- 
analysis and Psychotherapy, by Mortimer 
Ostow, Basic Books, New York, /. Nerv. 
Mcnt. Dis., 139: 591-592, 1964. 



Eichler, M., and Normax, J.: Repeated Use 
of the Bender Gestalt Test in a Study of 
an Induced To.xic State, Perceptual and 
Motor Skills, 1965. In press. 

Ferster, C. B., Findley, J. D., and Leve.xson, 
P. K. : A Method for Training Unrestrained 
Primates to Receive Drug Injections, /. E.vp. 
Anal. Behav., 7, 1964, 

FiNDLEY, J, D. : Programmed Environments for 
Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior, 
chapter in Operant Behavior and Psychology, 
edited by W. Honig, Appleton-Century- 
Crofts, New York, 1964. 

FiNDLEY, J. D., and Brady, J. V. : Facilitation of 
Large Fixed-Ratio Performance by Use of 
Conditional Reinforcement, /. Exp. Anal. 
Behav., 8, 1964. 

FiNDLEY, J. D., Zimmerman, J., and Schuster, 
C. : Second-Order Avoidance Behavior Under 
24-Hour Control Experiments, 1964. In press. 

FiNDLEY, J. D., and Ames, L. L. : A Note 
on Time Out from Avoidance with the 
Chimpanzee, /. E.rp. Anal. Behav., 1965. In 
press. 

FiNDLEY, J. D., Levenson, P. K., and Ferster, 
C. B. : A Method for Training Unrestrained 
Primates to Receive Drug Injections, /. E.vp. 
Anal. Behav., 7, 1964. 

Fowler, H. B., and Sata, L. S. : Clinic Staff 
Changes Create Community Anxiety, Ment. 
Hasp.. 612-617. Nov., 1964. 

Gilbert, M. S. W., and Tuerk, I. : Analysis of 
an Open-Ended Group for Alcoholic Patients. 

Glaser, K., and Clemmens, R. L. : School Fail- 
ure, Pediatrics, 35: 128-141, 1965. 

GoRWiTz, K., Klee, G. D., Kramer, M., Tuerk, 
I., and Bahn, A. : Psychiatric Services Re- 
ceived by Residents of an Entire State Dur- 
ing a One Year Period. Maryland Psychiatric 
Case Register : Analysis of the First Year's 
Experience, Public Health Rep. In press. 

Goulding, R., Monroe, R. R., Kramer, M., 
and Wise, S. : EEG Activation of Patients 
Receiving Phenothiazines and/or Chlordia- 
zepoxide. In press. 

Gross, A. : Training of Clinical Psychologists : 
A Mental Hospital Viewpoint, Proceedings 
of the Conference on Professional Preparation 
of Clinical Psychologists, Maryland Depart- 
ment of Mental Hygiene, 1964. 

Guttmacher, M. : Critique : Views of Thomas 
Szasz on Legal Psychiatry, Arch. Gen. 
Psychiat., 10: March, 1964. 



July, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIJ'ERSITV OF MARYLAND 



GuTTMACHER, M. : The Insanity of George III, 
Bull. Menniger Clin., 28: May, 1964. 

GuTTMACHER, M. : Jack Ruby, the Law, and 
Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins Mag., May, 1964. 

HuFFER, v., Scott, W. H., Connor, T. B., and 
LoviCE, H : Psychological Studies of Adult 
Male Patients with Sexual Infantilism Be- 
fore and After Androgen Therapy, Ann. In- 
tern. Med., 255-368, 1964. 
Addendum to above article appearing as 
Letter to the Editor, Ann. Intern. Med.. Dec, 
1964. 

Book Review : Psychobiological Approaches 
to Social Behavior by P. H. Leiderman and 
D. Shapiro, Stanford University Press, Curr. 
Med. Dig., 32: 398, 1965. 

Kenny, T., Baldwin, R., and Mackie, J. B. : 
Incidence of Minimal Brain Injury in 
Adopted Children, Maryland J . Med. In press. 

Klee, G. D., Kramer, M., Tuerk, I., Bahn, 
A., and Gorwitz, K. : Psychiatric Services 
Received by Residents of an Entire State 
During a One Year Period. Maryland Psychi- 
atric Case Register : Analysis of the First 
Year's Experience, Public Health Rep. In 
press. 

Klee, G. D. : Psychiatry and PubHc Health. 
The Pubhc Health Nurse in Psychiatric 
Home Care, Dis. Nerv. Syst.. 25: 476-479, 
1964. 

Kramer, M., Tuerk, I., Bahn, A., Gorwitz, 
K., and Klee, G. D. : Psychiatric Services 
Received by Residents of an Entire State 
During a One Year Period. Maryland Psychi- 
atric Case Register : Analysis of the First 
Year's Experience, Public Health Rep. In 
press. 

Kramer, M., Monroe, R. R., Goulding, R., 
and Wise, S. : EEG Activation of Patients 
Receiving Phenothiazines and/or Chlordia- 
zepoxide. In press. 

Krantz, J. C, and Braude, M.D. : Toxicity and 
Convulsive Activity of a Series of Theophyl- 
line Derivatives. To.ric. Appl. Pharmacol.. 
7: 291-300, 1965. 

KuBiE, L. : Lecture, APA Regional Meeting, 
The Ontogeny of Racial Prejudice, Novem- 
ber 20, 1964. In press. 

Kubie, L. : American Psychoanalytic Associa- 
tion, The Thinking Process, the Dream Pro- 
cess and the Dream, December 6, 1964. In 
press. 

Kubie, L. ; Book Review: City of Night, by 



John Rechy, Grove Press, New York, 1963, 
/. Nerv. Ment. Dis., 139: August, 1964. 

Kubie, L. : Editorial : The Changing Economics 
of Psychotherapeutic Practice, /. Nerv. Ment. 
Dis., 139: 311-312, 1964. 

Kubie, L. : Critique : The Effects of Psycho- 
therapy, by Hans J. Eysenck, Int. J. Soc. 
Psychiat., 1: 175-178, 1965. 

Kubie, L. : The Scientific Problems of Psycho- 
analysis, Ch. 17, 316-340, Scientific Psychology 
edited by Benj. B. Wolman and E. Nagel. 
Basic Books, Inc., New York, 1965. 

Kubie. L. ; The Biological Basis of Psychiatry : 
Viewpoint of the Psychoanalyst, Ch. 17, 135- 
143, Recent Advances in Biological Psy- 
chiatry, Vol. VIII, edited by Jos. Wartis. 
Plenum Press, New York, 1965. 

Kubie, L. : Blocks to Creativity. International 
Science and Technology, 69-78, June, 1965. 

Kubie, L. : The Struggle Between Proconscious 
Insights and Psychonoxious Rewards in Psy- 
chotherapy, Emil A. Gutheil Memorial Con- 
ference, October 25, 1964. In press. 

Kubie, L. : Boston Conference on Training in 
Psychiatry, October 30, 1964. In press. 

Kubie, L. : The Future of the Private Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Lowell Institute Series, 
Boston, M. G. H. March, 1964. In press. 

Kubie, L. : Editorial : A Tribute to Louis 
Dublin, Multiple Determinants of Suicidal 
Efforts, J. Nerv. Ment. Dis., 138: 3-8, 1964. 

Kubie, L. : Editorial : The Teleological Fallacy 
in Dynamic Psychology, /. Nerv. Ment. Dis., 
138: 103-104, 1964. 

Kubie, L. : Research in : Protecting Preconsci- 
ous Functions in Education ; Papers and Re- 
ports from the ASDC Seventh Curriculum 
Research Institute held in Washington, D. C, 
on December 2, 1961. Transactions published 
by the Association in April, 1964, pp. 28-42. 

Kubie, L. : New Forces Constraining the 
American Family ; delivered in New York 
on the occasion of the 75th Anniversary of 
the Child Study Association of America, at 
its 39th Annual Conference, Monday, March 
4, 1963. Published for the Association by 
Better Homes and Gardens, and distributed 
by the Association, April, 1964, pp. C1-C5. 

Kubie, L. : A School of Psychological Medi- 
cine Within the Framework of a Medical 
School and L'niversity, reprinted from the 
/. Med. Educ, 39: May, 1964. 

Kubie, L. : Provisions for the Care of Children 



]'ol. ^L N. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



of Divorced Parents : A New Legal Instru- 
ment, Yak Lazi' J., 73: 1197-1200, 1964. 
Klbie. L. : Traditionalism in Psychiatry, /. 

X.-n: Mail. Dis.. 139: 6-19, 1964. 
KriiiE. L. : Editorial : The Challenge of Divorce, 

/. Ncn: Ment. Dis., 138: 511-512, 1964. 
Lkvenson, p. K., Ferster. C. B., and Findley, 
J. D. : A Method for Training Unrestrained 
Primates to Receive Drug Injuctions, /. 
Exl>. Anal. Bchaz:, 7, 1964. 

LovicE, H., HuFFER, V., ScoTT, W. H., and 
CoN'NOR, T. B. : Psychological Studies of 
.Adult Male Patients with Sexual Infantilism 
Before and After Androgen Therapy, .-liiii. 
Intern. Med., 255-368, 1964. 
.Addendum to above article appearing as Letter 
to the Editor, Ann. Intern. Med., Dec, 1964. 
Review : Psychobiological Approaches to 
Social Behavior, by P. H. Leiderman, and D. 
Shapiro. Stanford L^niversity Press, C\irr. 
Med. Dig., 32: 398, 1965. 

M.MKiE. J. B., Kenny, T., and Baldwin, R. : 
Incidence of Minimal Brain Injury in Adopted 
Children, Maryland Med. J. In press. 

M.MKiE, J. B., and Beck, H. C. : Personality 
Organization and Brain Damage, Psychiat. 
Spectator, 1: Sept., 1964. 

M.vcKiE, J. B., and Beck, H. C. : Age, Intelli- 
gence and CFF, Psychomotor Skills. In press. 

MicKLE, W. A., and Monroe, R. R. : Chloralose 
.Activation of the EEG in Psychiatric Patients. 
In press. 

Monroe, R. R., and Braude, M. C. : Neuro- and 
and Psychopharmacologic Studies of Alpha- 
glucochloralose (AGS) and Dimethylsul- 
fo.xide (IMSO), Fed. Proc. 24: 390, 1965. 

Monroe, R. R., and Braude, M. C. : Dimethyl- 
sulfoxide : Solubilizing and Interactive EfTects 
with Alphaglucochloralose. In press. 

Monroe. R. R., and Balis, G. U. : The Pharma- 
cology of Chloralose : A Review, Psy- 
chopharmacologia, 6: 1-30, 1964. 

Monroe, R. R., and Mickle, W. A. : Chloralose 
Activation of the EEG in Psychiatric 
Patients. In press. 

AIonroe, R. R., Goulding, R., Kramer, M., 
and Wise, S. : EEG Activation of Patients 
Receiving Phenothiazines and/or Chlordia- 
zepoxide. In press. 

Monroe, R. R., and Dale, R. : Chlordiaze- 
poxide in the Treatment of Patients with 
Activated EEC's. In press. 

Monroe, R. R., and \\'ise. S. : Combined Pheno- 



thiazine, Chloriazepoxide and Primidone 
Therapy for Uncontrolled Psychotic Patients. 
In press. 

M(n( HAR, J., and Bass, B. : Experiences in 
Group Counseling with Aging Men in an 
Out-patient Setting, Geriatrics. 

Norman, J., and Euiier, M. : Repeated Use of 
the Bender Gestalt Test in a Study of an 
Induced Toxic State, Perceptual and Motor 
Skills, 1965. In press. 

Overall, B., and Aronson, H. : Treatment Ex- 
pectations of Patients in Two Social Classes. 
In press. 

Overall, B., and -Aronson, H. : Expectations of 
Psychotherapy in Patients of Lower Socio- 
economic Class, reprinted in Mental Health 
of the Poor, edited by Riessman, Cohen, and 
Pearl, The Free Press of Glencoe, Collier- 
Macmillan Ltd., London, 1964. 

Pope, M., and Siegman, A. W. : An Intercor- 
relational Study of Some Indices of Verbal 
Fluency, Psychological Rep., 15: 303-310, 
1964. 

Pope, B., and Siegman, A. W. : Interviewer 
Specificity and Topical Focus in Relation to 
Interviewee Productivity, /. Verbal Behav. 
In press. 

Pope, B., and Siegman, A. W. : Efifects of 
Question Specificity and Anxiety Producing 
Messages on Verbal Fluency in the Initial 
Interview, /. Personality Social Psychol. In 
press. 

Pope, B., and Siegman, A. W. : Personality 
Variables Associated with Productivity and 
Verbal Fluency in the Initial Interview, APA 
Proceedings, 1965. In press. 

Rafferty, F. : Group Organization Theory and 
the Adolescent Inpatient Unit in Problems 
of Vonth: Transition to Adulthood in a 
Changing World, edited by Muzafer and 
Caroly Sherig, Aldine Publishing Co., 
Chicago, Illinois, 1965. 

Sata, L. S. : Pragmatic Psychiatry and Travel- 
ing Community Health (Mental) Clinics, 
Ment. Hyg., 600-604, 1964. 

Sata, L. S., and Fowler, H. B. : Clinic Staff 
Changes Create Community Anxiety, Ment. 
Hasp., 612-617, 1964. 

Schleifer, C. B., and Derbyshire, R. : De- 
segregation of a State Mental Hospital for 
Negroes: A Study of Staff .Attitudes, Amcr. 
J. Psychiat.. 121: April, 1965. 

Schleifer, C. B., and Derbyshire, R. : Symp- 



/»/v. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



toms and Sj'mptom Change in Hospitalized 
Negro and White Mental Patients, with R. 
Brown, /. Hum. Bchav. In press. 

ScHXAPER, X. : Management of Emotional Dis- 
orders : A Manual for Physicians, A. H. 
Chapman, ]. Ncrv. Ment. Dis., 138: Jan., 1964. 

ScHXAPER, N. : Should the Adopted Child Be 
Told that He is Adopted, Maryland Med. J., 
13: 35, 1965, abstracted by Pediatric Digest, 
Mod. Med.. Curr. Med. Dig., and Obstet. 
Gyncc. Survey. 

ScHNAPER, N. : Care of the Dying Patient, 
Med. Times, May, 1965. 

Schuster, C, Findley, J. D., and Zi.m.merman, 
J. : Second-Order Avoidance Behavior Under 
24-Hour Control Experiments, 1964. In press. 

ScoTT, W. H., Connor, T. B., Lovice, H., and 
HuFFER, V. : Psychological Studies of Adult 
Male Patients with Sexual Infantilism Be- 
fore and After Androgen Therapy, Ann. 
Intern. Med., 255-368, 1964. 
Addendum to above article appearing as Letter 
to the Editor, Ann. Intern. Med., Dec. 1964. 
Book Review: Psychobiological Approaches 
to Social Behavior, P. H. Leiderman and D. 
Shapiro, Stanford University Press, Curr. 
Med.Dig.,Z2:i9i, 1965. 

SiEGMAX, A. W., and Pope^ B.: An Intercor- 
relational Study of Some Indices of Verbal 
Fluency, Psychologic. Reports, 15: 303-310, 
1964. 

SIEGM.A.X, A. W., and Pope, B. : Interviewer 
Specificity and Topical Focus in Relation to 
Interviewer Productivity, /. Uerb. Bclniv. In 
press. 

SiEGMAX, A. W., and Pope, B. : Effects of 
Question Specificity and Anxiety Producing 
Messages on Verbal Fluency in the Initial 
Interview, /. Personality Social Psychol. In 
press. 

SiEGMAX, A. \V., and Pope, B.: Personality 
Variables Associated wdth Productivity and 
Verbal Fluency in the Initial Interview, APA 
Proceedings, 1965. In press. 

Styrt, J.: Review: The Mask of Sanity, 4th 
Ed., by Clockley, Bull. Hopkins Hasp. In 
press. 

Tuerk, L, Bahn, A., GoRwiTz, K., Rlee, G. D., 
and Kramer, J. : Psychiatric Services Re- 
ceived by Residents of an Entire State During 
a One Year Period. Maryland Psychiatric 
Case Register : Analysis of the First Year's 
Experience, Public Health Rep. In press. 



Tuerk, I., and Gilbert, M. S. W. : Analysis 
of an Open-Ended Group for Alcoholic 
Patients. 

Weintraub, W., and Aronson, H. : The Appli- 
cation of Verbal Behavior Analysis to the 
Study of Psychological Defense Mechanisms. 
II : Speech Pattern Associated with Impulsive 
Behavior, /. Ncrv. Ment. Dis., 1.39: July, 
1964. 

Weintraub, W., and Aronson, H. : The Appli- 
cations of Verbal Behavior Analysis to the 
Study of Psychological Defense Mechanisms. 
Ill: Speech Pattern Associated with De- 
lusional Behavior. Accepted for publication. 

Weisman, M. : The Prague Sobering-up 
Stations : An Eye-Witness Report, Maryland 
Med. J., Oct., 1964. 

Weisman, M. : Psychoanalysis and Community 
Psychiatry, Science and Psychoanalysis. 8: 
1965. 

Will, O. : The Beginning of Psychotherapeutic 
E.xperience, Modern Psychotherapeutic Prac- 
tice, edited by Arthur Burton. To be pub- 
lished spring, 1965. 

Will, O. : Schizophrenia and the Psychothera- 
peutic Field, Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 
fall, 1964. 

Will, O. : The Schizophrenic Patient, the 
Psychotherapist, and the Consultant. To be 
published in Contemporary Psychoanalysis. 

Wise, S., Monroe, R. R., Goulding, R., and 
Kramer, M. : EEG Activation of Patients Re- 
ceiving Phenothiazines and/or Chlordiazepox- 
ide. In press. 

Wise, S., and Monroe, R. R. : Combined Pheno- 
thiazine, Chlordiazepoxide and Primidone 
Therapy for Uncontrolled Psychotic Patients. 
In press. 

Young, I., and Aronson, H. : Treatment Ex- 
pectations of Patients in Two Social Classes, 
Social Work. In press. 

Zl.MMERMAN, J., ScHUSTER, C, and FiNDLEV, 

J. D. : Second-Order Avoidance Behavior 
Under 24-Hour Control E.xperinients, 1964. 
In press. 



DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY 

Bloedorn, F. G. : Therapy of Cancer and Allied 
Diseases by Interstitial Intracavitary and Sur- 
face Gamma-Ray Therapy, The Science of 
Ionizing Radiation: Modes of Application, 
Charles C Thomas, Springfield. Illinois, 1965. 



Uol. .i/. No. '3 



MEIUC.IL SCHOOL SECTIO.S 



Bloedorn, F. G., and Wizexberc, M. J.: Pre- 
operative Irradiation: Basis for its Indi- 
cation, Radiol. Clin. (Basel), 33: 287-299, 
1964. 

Bloedorx. F. G., Wizenberg, M. J., Cowley, 
R. A., CicciA. C. A., Mercado. J., Jr.. and 
LiNBERG, E. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Anicr. J. Roc»tycn., 
92: 77-87, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Wizenberg. M. J., Bloedorn, 
F. G., CucciA, C. A., Mercado, J., Jr., and 
LiXBERG, E. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Amcr. J. Rociitgcit., 
92: 77-87, 1964. 

Clccia. C. a., Cowlev, R. a., \\'izexberg, 
M. J., Bloedorn, F. G., Mercado, J., Jr., and 
LixBERG, E. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Aiiwr. J. Roenti]C»., 
92: 77-87, 1964. 

Dexxis, J. M. : Excretory Urography as a 
Screening Procedure for Renovascular Hyper- 
tension. Maryland Med. J. .Accepted for publi- 
cation, August, 1965. 

LixBERG, E. J., Mercado, J., Jr., Clccia, C. A., 
Cowley, R. A., Wizenberg, J. J., and Bloe- 
dorn, F. G. : Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Amer. J. Roentgen., 
92: 77-87, 1964. 

Lixberg. E. J., and Wizexberg, M. J.: Further 
Experiences witli Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Jour. Thorac. 
Cardiov. Stirg., 1965. 

Lyox'^, J. A. : Cardiac Evaluation from Routine 
Chest Films, Maryland Med. J., 13: 69, 1964. 

McDoucall, R. S., and Robinson, J. E. : A 
Simple, Inexpensive, Manually Operated Iso- 
does Plotter. Accepted for publication in 
Amer. J. Roentgen. 

Mercado, J., Jr., Cuccia, C. A., Cowley, R. A., 
Wizenberg, M. J., Bloedorn, F. G., and 
Lixberg, E. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Amer. }. Roentgen., 
92: 77-87,1964. 

Robinson, J. E. : Effects of Irradiation in Cell 
Cultures, Chapter 12. The Science of Ionizing 
Radiation : Modes of .4ffl'catio)i. Charles C 
Thomas, Springfield, Illinois, 1965. 

Robinson, J. E., and McDoug.\ll, R. S. : A 
Simple, Inexpensive, Manually Operated Iso- 
dose Plotter. Accepted for publication in 
Amer. J. Roentgen. 

-Seydel, H. G. : Hemorrhage in Ehrlich Ascites 
Tumor, Nature (London), 206, 1965. 



Sevdel, H. G. ; The Diameters of the Cereliral 
Arteries of the Human Fetus, The Anatomical 
Rev.. 150, Sept., 1964. 

Seydel. H. G. : Radiation Induced Changes in 
the .-Xcridine Organgc Staining of Exfoliated 
Cells from Human Cancer. .Accepted for 
publication in Cancer. 

Seydel, H. G. : Severe Psoriasis Complicating 
Radiation Therapy. Accepted for publication 
in /. Mich. Med. Soc. 

Wizenberg, M. J., and Bloedorn, F. G. : Pre- 
operative Irradiation ; Basis for its Indi- 
cation, Radiol. Clin. (Basel), 33: 287-299, 
1964. 

Wizenberg, M. J., Bloedorn, F. G., Cowley. 
R. A., Cuccia, C. A., Mercado, J., Jr.. and 
Linberg, E. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Amcr. J. Roentgen., 
92: 77-87, 1964. 

Wizenberg, M. J., and Linberg, E. J. : Further 
E.xperiences with Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Jour. Thorac. 
Cardiov. Surg., 1965. 

WoLFEL, D. A. : Lymphicovenous Communica- 
tions : A Clinical Reality. Accepted for publi- 
cation by Amer. J. Roentgen. 

^^'oLFEL, D. A. : Aortography : A Practical Ap- 
proach, Maryland Med. J., 13: 12, 1964. 

RADIOISOTOPE LABORATORY 

Connor, T. G., and Workii.\n, J. G. : Pre- 
operative Localization of Parathyroid Adeno- 
mata, /. Nucl. Med., 5: 353, 1964. 

Workman, J. G., and Connor, T. G. : Pre- 
operative Localization of Parathyroid Adeno- 
mata, /. Nucl. Med., 5: 353, 1964. 

Workman, J. G. : Localization of Parathyroid 
Adenomas by Radioisotope Technics Clinical 
Aspects. To be published as a part of a 
Symposium on Advances in Nuclear Medicine 
— Hahnemann School of Medicine, Phila- 
delphia, Penn., March, 1965. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Attar, S., Beech, A., Cowley, A. R., and 
Mansberger, a. R. : The Possible Relation- 
ship of Certain Chromatographic Changes to 
Coagulation Aberrations in Hypotensive 
Patients, /. Trauma, 5: 96, 1965. 

Attar, S., Henning, G., Blair, E., Michaelis, 
M., Esmond, W. G., and Cowley, R. A. : The 
Effect of Hyperbaric O.xygenation (OPH) 



Julv. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNirERSITV OF MARYLAND 



on Three Forms of Shock — Traumatic, 
Hemorrhagic, and Septic, /. Trauma, 4: 652- 
663, 1964. 

Attar, S., Cowley, R, A., Blair, E., Ollo- 
DART, R. M., and Esmond, W. : Prevention and 
Treatment of Shock by Hyperbaric Oxygena- 
tion, Ann. N.y. Acad. Sci., 117: 673, 1965. 

Attar, S., Ollodart, R. M., Mansberger, A. R., 
Cowley, R. A., and Buxton, R. W. : Therapy 
of Refractory Shock. Accepted for pubhca- 
tion, Ann. Surg.. 1965. 

Attar, S., Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., and Ollo- 
dart, R. M. : Hyperbaric Oxygen (OHP) 
Therapy in Shock and Hypotension. In press. 

Attar, S., Mansberger, A., Ollodart, R. M., 
Cowley, R., and Buxton, R. : Therapy of 
Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg., June, 1965. 

Attar, S., Blair, E., Ollodart, R. M., and 
Cowley, R. : Hyperbaric Oxygen in Shock, 
Anicr. Surg. In press. 

Attar, S., Mansberger, A., Ollod.\rt, R. M., 
Cowley, R., and Buxton, R. : Therapy of 
Refractory Shock. In press. 

Bains, J. W., Ketcham, A. S., and Crawford, 
D. T. : A Standard Model for Tensiometric 
Studies, National Cancer Institute, /. Surg. 
Res., 5: June, 1965. 

Beech, A., Attas. S., Cowley, A. R., and 
Mansberger, A. R. : The Possible Relation- 
ship of Certain Chromatographic Changes to 
Coagulation Aberrations in Hypotensive 
Patients, /. Trauma, 5: 96, 1965. 

Blair, E., Michaelis, M., Henning, G., Attar, 
S., Esmond, W. G., and Cowley, R. A. : The 
Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation (OPH) 
on Three Forms of Shock — Traumatic, 
Hemorrhagic and Septic, /. Trauma, 4: 652- 
663, 1964. 

Blair, E., Ollodart, R. M., Cowley, R., Attar, 
S., and Esmond, W. : Prevention and Treat- 
ment of Shock by Hyperbaric Oxygenation, 
Aim. N.y. Acad. Sci., 117: 673, 1965. 

Blair, E., Ollodart, R. M., Cowlev, R., and 
Attar, S. : Hyperbaric Oxygen (OHP) 
Therapy in Shock and Hypotension. In press. 

Blair, E., Ollodart, R. M., Attar, S., and 
Cowley, R. : Hyperbaric Oxygen in Shock, 
Amcr. Surg. In press. 

Buxton, R. W. : Peptic Ulcer : Theory and 
Therapy. (Panelists: I. J. Pincus, R. W. 
Buxton, and R. O. Kraft.) Univ. Mich. Med. 
Bull., 30: May- June, 1964. 

Buxton, R. W., Cox, E. F., and Flotte. C. T. : 



Dextran in Treatment of Thrombophlebitis, 
Surgery, 57: 225-229, 1965. 

Buxton, R. W., Reynolds, B. D., and Leveqce, 
T. F. : The Mast Cell as an Indicator of the 
Extent of Trauma, Arch. Surg. (Chicago). 
Also presented in the Mast Cell, edited by 
Hans Selye. For release 1965. 

Buxton, R. W., Cowley, R. A., Attar, S., 
Ollodart, R. M., and Mansberger, A. R. : 
Therapy of Refractory Shock. Accepted for 
publication, Ann. Surg., June, 1965, 

Buxton, R., Cowley, R., Attar, S., Mans- 
berger, A., and Ollodart, R. M. : Therapy 
of Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg., June, 1965. 

Buxton, R., Cowley, R., Attar, S., Mans- 
berger, A., and Ollodart, R. M. : Therapy 
of Refractory Shock. In press. 

Cowley, A. R., Beech, A., Attar, S., and 
Mansberger, A. R. : The Possible Relation- 
ship of Certain Chromatographic Changes 
to Coagulation Aberrations in Hypotensive 
Patients, /. Trauma, 5: 96, 1965. 

Cowley, R. A., Esmond, W. G., Attar, S., 
Henning, G., Blair, S., and Michaelis, M. ; 
The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation 
(OPH) on Three Forms of Shock — Trau- 
matic, Hemorrhage, and Septic, /. Trauma, 
4: 652-663, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Ollodart, R. M., 
Attar, S., and Esmond, VV. : Prevention and 
Treatment of Shock by Hyperbaric Oxygena- 
tion, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 117: 673, 1965. 

Cowley, R. A., Attar, S., Ollodart, R. M., 
Mansberger, A. R., and Buxton, R. W. : 
Therapy of Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg., 
June, 1965. Accepted for publication. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Ollodart, R. M., 
and Attar, S. : Hyperbaric O.xygen (OHP) 
Therapy in Shock and Hypotension. In press. 

Cowley, R., Attar, S., Mansberger, A., Ollo- 
dart, R. M., and Buxton, R. : Therapy of 
Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg., June, 1965. 

Cowley, R., Attar, S., Blair, E. and Ollo- 
dart, R. M. : Hyperbaric Oxygen in Shock, 
Am. J. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R., Attar, S., Mansberger, A., Ollo- 
dart, R. M., and Buxton, R. : Therapy of 
Refractory Shock. In press. 

Cox, E. F. : Safer Method of Translumber 
Aortography, Hemobilia Secondary to Vim- 
Silverman Needle Biopsy, The Occluded Ex- 
tremity — .\ Shock Preparation, and Washout 



Vol. .>!. No. 3 



MF.liIC.IL SCHOOL Sl-CTIOX 



Acklosis Following Aortic Resection. In 
preparation. 

Cox, E. F., Flotte, C. T., and Blxto.v. R. \V. : 
Dcxtran in Treatment of Thronibophlobitis, 
Siirtirry. 57: 225-229, 1965. 

Co.x, E. F. : Patient Evaluation for Pelvic Ex- 
enteration, Amer. Surg., 30: 574, 1964. 

Cox, E. F. : Film presentation, Hcmimaxil- 
Icctoiiiy for Adenocarcinoma , on closed circuit 
T. V. at the Annual Meeting of tlic .•\nierican 
Dental Association, San Francisco. Xov. 10, 
1964, with McDonald K. Hamilton, D.D.S., 
and Richard P. Beimler, D.D.S.) 

Cox, E. F. : Exhibit, Safer Method of Tnins- 
lumbcr Aortography, Southeastern Surgical 
Congress, Washington, D. C, Mar. 29-April 
1. 1965. 

Crawford. D. T. : Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase 
in the Immediate Postoperative Period, 
Amer. Surg., 30: Oct., 1964. 

Cr.\\vford, D. T., Baixs, J. W., and Ketcham, 
A. S. : A Standard Model for Tensiometric 
Studies, National Cancer Institute, /. Surg. 
Res., 5: June, 1965. 

Esmond, W. G., Attar, S., Henning. G., Blair, 
E., MicHAELis, M., and Cowley. R. A.: 
The Eflfect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation 
(OPH) on Three Forms of Shock— Trau- 
matic. Hemorrhagic, and Septic. /. Trauma, 
i: 652-663, 1964. 

Esmond, W., Attar, S., Cowley, R. A., Blair, 
E., and Ollodart, R. M. : Prevention and 
Treatment of Shock by Hyperbaric Oxygena- 
tion, Anil. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 117: 673, 1965. 

Flotte, C. T., Buxton, R. W., and Cox, E. F. : 
Dextran in Treatment of Thrombophlebitis, 
Surgery, 57: 225-229, 1965. 

Flotte, C. T. : Dextran in Treatment of 
Thrombophlebitis, Maryland Med. J., 13: 
76-77, 1964. 

Flotte, C. T. : Use of Hydrogen Peroxide as 
a Source of Oxygenation in the Perfusion of 
Isolated Organs, Surg. Forum, 15: 275-277, 
1964. 

Flotte. C. T. ; Reconstituted Collagen Sutures : 
Experimental Evaluation, Arch. Surg. 
(Chicago), 90: 86-89, 1965. 

Henning, G., Blair, E., Michaelis, M., Attar, 
S., Esmond, W. G., and Cowley, R. A. : The 
Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation (OPH) 
on Three Forms of Shock — Traumatic, 
Hemorrhagic, and Septic, /. Trauma, 4: 652- 
663. 1964. 



Jklenko, C, III: Marfanil Mystery, Surg. 
Oyncc. Ohstct. In press. 

Just-Vxera. J. O., and Yeager, G. H. : Clinical 
Use of Rapidly Polymerizing Tissue Ad- 
hesive : Preliminary Report, Amer. Surg., 
30: March, 1964. 

Just-Viera, J. O., and Yeager, G. H. : Massive 
Pulmonary Embolism: II Predictable Mor- 
tality and Cardiopulmonary Changes in Dogs 
Breathing Room .Air, .Inn. Surg., 1.59: April, 
1964. 

Just-Viera, J. O., and Yeager, G. H. : Massive 
Pulmonary Embolism : IV The \'alue of 
Hyperbaric O-xygen as Therapy, /. Thorac. 
Cardiov. Surg., 48: 185-199, 1964. 

Ketcham, A. S., Crawford, D. T., and Bains, 
J. W. : A Standard Model for Tensiometric 
Studies, National Cancer Institute, /. Surg. 
Res., 5: June, 1965. 

Leveque. T. F., Reynolds, B. D., and Buxton, 
R. W. : The Mast Cell as an Indicator of 
the Extent of Trauma, Arch. Surg. (Chicago). 
Also presented in the Mast Call, edited by 
Hans Selye. For release 1965. 

Lix-BERG, E., and Mansberger, A. R. : First 
Rib Resection for Distal Exposure of Sub- 
clavian Vessels, Surg. Gynec. Obstct., 120: 
579, March, 1965. 

AIansberger, a. R. : Therapy of Refractor 
Shock, Maryland Med. /., 13: 78, 1964. 

Mansberger, A. R. : The Diagnostic Value of 
Abdominal Paracentesis with Special Refer- 
ences to Peritoneal Fluid Ammonia Levels, 
Amer. Castroent., 42: 150, 1964. 

Mansberger, A. R. : The Possible Relationship 
of Certain Chromatographic Changes to 
Coagulation Aberrations in Hypotensive 
Patients with S. Attar, A. Beech, and A. R. 
Cowdey, /. Trauma, 5: 96, 1965. 

Mansberger, A. R. : First Rib Resection for 
Distal Exposure of Subclavian Vessels with 
E. Linberg, Surg. Gynec. Obstct., 120: 579, 
1965. 

Mansberger, A. R., Ollodart, R. M., Attar, 
S., Cowley, R. A., and Buxton, R. W. : 
Therapy of Refractory Shock. Accepted for 
publication, Ann. Surg., June, 1965. 

Mansberger, A. R., and Young, J. D. : Am- 
mona Levels as an Aid to the Diagnosis of 
Urinary Extravasation. Accepted for publi- 
cation, /. Urol. 

Mansberger, A. R., Ollodart, R. M., Attar, 



Julx. 1966 



BULLETIS OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. VKIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



S., CowLEV, R., and Buxton, R. : Therapy 
of Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg., June, 1965. 

Mansberger, a. R., Ollodart, R. M., Attar, 
S., Cowley, R., and Buxton, R. : Therapy 
of Refractory Shock. In press. 

Mtchaelis, M., Blair, E., Henning, G., At- 
tar, S., Esmond, W. G., and Cowley, R. A. : 
The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation 
(OPH) on Three Forms of Shock — Trau- 
matic, Hemorrhagic, and Septic, /. Trauma, 
4: 652-663, 1964. 

Ollodart, R. M., Blair, E., Cowley, R., 
.'\ttar, S., and Esmond, W. : Prevention and 
Treatment of Shock by Hyperbaric Oxygena- 
tion, Ann. N.y. Acad. ScL, 117: 673, 1965. 

Ollodart, R. M. : High Pressure Oxygen as 
an Adjunct in Experimental Bacteremic 
Shock, J.A.M.A., 191: 736, 1965. 

Ollodart, R. M., Mansberger, A. R., Attar, 
S., Cowley, R. A., and Buxton, R. W. : 
Therapy of Refractory Shock. Accepted for 
pubHcation, Ann. Surg., June, 1965. 

Ollodart, R. AI.. Blair, E., Cowley, R., 
and Attar, S. : Hyperbaric Oxygen (OHP) 
Therapy in Shock and Hypotension. In press. 

Ollodart, R. M. : OHP as an Adjunct in 
Septic Shock, Symposium on Shock, National 
Research Council. In press. 

Ollod.\rt, R. M. : Bacterial Defense in Shock, 
Aincr. Surg. In press. 

Ollodart, R. M., Mansberger, A., Attar, S., 
Cowley, R., and Buxton, R. : Therapy of 
Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg., June, 1965. 

Ollodart, R. M., Blair, E., Attar. S., and 
Cowley, R. : Hyperbaric Oxygen in Shock, 
Amcr. Surg. In press. 

Ollodart, R. M., Mansberger, A., Attar, S., 
Cowley, R., and Buxton, R. : Therapy of 
Refractory Shock. In press. 

Reynolds, B. D., Buxton, R. W., and Leve- 
que, T. F. : The Mast Cell as an Indicator 
of the Extent of Trauma, Arch. Surg. Also 
presented in the Mast Cell, edited by Hans 
Selye. For release 1965. 

Shipley, E. R. : Re-Evaluation of Furacin as 
a Local Agent in the Treatment of Surface 
Infections, Amcr. Surg., 31: April, 1965. 

Yeager, G. H., and Just-Viera, J. O. : Clinical 
Use of Rapidly Polymerizing Tissue Ad- 
hesive; Preliminary Report, Amcr. Surg., 30: 
March, 1964. 

Yeager, G. H., and Just-Viera, J. O. : Massive 
Pulmonarv Embolism : II Predictable Mor- 



tality and Cardiopulmonary Changes in Dogs 
Breathing Room Air, Ann. Surg., 159: April, 
1964. 

Yeager, G. H., and Just-Viera, J. O. : Massive 
Pulmonary Embolism : IV The Value of 
Hyperbaric Oxygen as Therapy, /. Tlior. 
Cardioz: Surg., 48: 185-199, 1964. 

Young, J. D., and Mansberger, A. R. : Am- 
monia Levels as an Aid to the Diagnosis 
of Urinary Extravasation. Accepted for 
publication, /. Urol. 

Division of Neurological Surgery 

Adams, J. E., Meyer, P. D., and Henderson. 
C. M. : Development of a New Carotid 
Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with a Previ- 
ously Operated Ipsilateral Carotid Aneurysm. 

Arnold, J. G., Jr. : Neurosurgical Experience 
with Echoencephalography, Med. Ann. D. C, 
June, 1964. 

Arnold, J. G., Jr., Wagner, J. A., and AIever. 
P. D. : Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Subdural 
Hematoma — an Unusual Complication of 
Hodgkin's Disease, Bull. Sch. Med. Uniz: 
Maryland, April, 1965. 

DuRKAN, J. P., and Russo, G. L. : Ultrasonic 
Fetal Cephalometry ; Accuracy, Limitations 
and Applications. Submitted for publication. 

Henderson, C. M., Meyer, P. D., and Adams. 
J. E. : Development of a New Carotid Artery 
Aneurysm in a Patient with a Previously 
Operated Ipsilateral Carotid Aneurysm. 

Meyer, P. D., Henderson, C. M., and Adams. 
J. E. : Development of a New Carotid Artery 
Aneurysm in a Patient with a Previously 
Operated Ipsilateral Carotid Aneurysm. 

Meyer, P. D., Wagner, J. A., and Arnold, 
J. G. : Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Subdural 
Hematoma — an Unusual Complication of 
Hodgkin's Disease, Bull. Sch. Med. Univ. 
Maryland, April, 1965. 

MosBERG, W. H., Jr. : Graduate Medical Edu- 
cation in the United States of America with 
Some Special Reference to Neurological 
Surgery. To be published in Indian J. Med. 
Educ. 

Mosberg, W. H., Jr. : Report of National Ad 
Hoc Head Injury Nomenclature Committee, 
Clin. Neurosurg., Vol. 13. 

Russo, G. L. : Neurosurgical Experience with 
Echoencephalography, Med. Ann. D. C, 
June, 1964. 

Russo, G. L. : Ultrasonic Fetal Cephalometry : 



To/. 51, No 3 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



Accuracy. Limitations and Apiilications, with 
James r. Diirkan. Submitted lor publication. 
\\".\r,NKi(. J. A., Meyek, p. D., and Arnold, 
J. G. : Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Subdural 
Hematoma — an Unusual Complication of 
Hodgkin's Disease, Bull. Sell. Med. Univ. 
M.iryUmd, April, 1965. 

Division of Otolaryngology 

Bl.\.\cii.\rd, C. L., and E.ngnoth, M. L. : 
Fray's Syndrome. In press. 

Bi..\xcHARD, D. L., and Urban, G. E. : Hyper- 
baric Oxygenation Effect on Auditory Evoked 
Cortical Responses. In press. 

E.vGNOTH, M. L., and Blanchard, C. L. : Frey's 
Syndrome. In press. 

Urb.an, G. E., and Blanchard, D. L. : Hyper- 
baric O.xygenation Effect on Auditory 
Evoked Cortical Responses. In press. 

Division of Thoracic Surgery 

Attar. S., Blair. E., Cowlev, R. A., Gutier- 
REG, G. E., and Es.mond, W. G. : Hyperbaric 
Oxygenation in Massive Pulmonary Embol- 
ism, Dis. Chest, 46: 537, 1964. 

Attar, S., Esmond, W. G., Blair, E., and 
Cowlev, R. A. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
Massive Pulmonary Embolism, Surg. Forum, 
15: 200, 1964. 

Attar, S., Blair, E., Cowlev, R. A., and 
FiscHLER, M. : Square- Wave 250 Cycle 
Cardiac Defibrillation — Use in Cardiac 
Surgery, Arch. Surg., 90: 29, 1965. 

Attar, S., Cowley, R. A., Bl.\ir, E., Esmond, 
W. G., MiCHAELis, M., and Ollodart, R. : 
Prevention and Treatment of Shock by 
Hyperbaric Oxj'genation, Ann. N.Y. Acad. 
Sci., 117: 673, 1965. 

Attar. S., Blair, E., Henning, G., Esmond, 
W. G., Cowley, R. A., and Michaelis, M. : 
The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation 
(OHP) on Three Forms of Shock — Trau- 
matic, Hemorrhagic and Septic, /. Trauma, 
4:652, 1964. 

Att.\r, S., Blair, E., and Esmond, W. G. : 
The Effect of Hypothermia on Lung Function, 
Ann. Surg., 100: 814, 1964. 

Attar, S., Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., and 
Esmond, W. G. : Hyperbaric Oxygen in 
Shock ill Shock-Hypotension, Grune and 
Stratton, 1965. 

Att.\r, S., Blair, E., Esmond, W. G., and 



Cowlev. R. .\. : The Vtilizalion oj Hyper- 
baric O.rygenalion in Hemorrhagic Shock. 
In Clinical Application oj Hyperbaric O.ry- 
genalion, Elsevier Publication Co., .Amster- 
dam, 1964. 

Attar, S., and Cowley, R. A.: Re-evaluation 
of Hyperbaric Oxygenation in Hemorrhagic 
Shock, Surg. Forum, 16: 1965. In press. 

.\ttar, S., Singleton, R., Hankins, J., Lin- 
berg, E., Lyon, J., and Cowley, R. A.: 
Congenital Anomalies of the Pulmonary 
Arteries, /. Thorac. Cardiov. Ssurg. In press. 

Attar, S. : Hankins, J., and Cowlev, R. A. : 
Emergency Repair of Antriogenic Mitral In- 
sufficiency, /. Thorac. Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

Attar, S., Blair, E., Ollodart, R., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
the Treatment of Experimental Shock, Amer. 
J. Surg. In press. 

Attar, S., Blair, E., Ollodart, R., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
the Treatment of Experimental Shock, Amer. 
J. Surg. In press. 

Attar, S., Mansberger, A. R., Beech, A., 
and Covv'LEY, R. A. : The Possible Relationship 
of Certain Chromatographic Changes to 
Coagulation Aberrations in Hypotensive 
Patients, /. Trauma, 5: 90, 1965. 

Attar, S., Blair, E., Ollodart, R., Esmond, 
W. G., and Cowley, R. A.; The Effect of 
Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Bacteremia 
Shock, Circulation, 29: 135-139, 1964. 

Attar, S., Esmond, W. G., Blair, E., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Experimental Aspects of the 
Use of Hyperbaric Oxygen in Hemorrhagic 
Shock, Amer. Surg., 30: 243, 1964. 

Attar, S., Mansberger, A. R., Blair, E., 
Cowley, R. A., and Buxton, R. : The Therapy 
of Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Attar, S., Mansberger, A. R., Ollodart, R., 
McLaughlin, J., and Cowley, R. A. : A 
Physiologic Approach to the Correction of 
Hypotension, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Attar, S., Mansberger, A. R., Kirby, W. H., 
Masaitis, C, and Cowley, R. A. : The Effect 
of Hemorrhagic Shock on Clotting Time in 
Humans, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Attar, S., Mansberger, A. R., Irani, B., 
Masaitis, C, Kirby, W. H., and Cow-ley, 
R. A. : II, The Behavior of Fibrogen in 
Clinical Septic Shock. In press. 

Att.\r, S., Kirby, W. G., Irani, B., Masaitis, 
C. A., Mansberger, A. R., and Cowley, 



Jtilv, 1966 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. CXWERSITY OF MARYLAND 



R. A.: Ill, The Effect of Septic Shock 
in Clotting Time in Humans, Ann. Sura. In 
press. 

Baker. B.. Hurdle, E., Kaestxer, R., C.\rski, 
T., Fraxzone, J., Lewitinn, A., Cowley, 
R. A., and Esmond, W. G. : ReliabiHty 
Engineering for Open Heart Surgery. BnH. 
Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland. Oct., 1964. 

Beech, A., Mansberger, A. R., Attar, S., and 
Cowley, R. A. : The Possible Relationship 
of Certain Chromatographic Changes to 
Coagulation Aberrations in Hypotensive 
Patients, /. Trauma, 5: 90, 1965. 

Blair, E., Herman, R., and Cowley, R. A. : 
Interventricular Septal Defect in Identical 
Twins, /. Thorac. Cardiov Surg. In press. 

Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., and Tait, M. K. : 
Lactacidemia from Septic Shock in Man, 
Amcr. Surg. In press. 

Blair, E., Ollodart, R., Attar, S., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
the Treatment of Experimental Shock, Anicr. 
J . Surg. In press. 

Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., and Buxton, R. : 
Hyperbaric Oxygenation in the Treatment of 
Experimental Shock, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Blair. E., Cowley, R. A., Mansberger, A. R., 
and BuxTOX, R. : The Therapy of Re- 
fractory Shock, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Blair, E., Mansberger, A. R., Attak, S., 
Cowley, R. A., and Buxton, R. : The 
Therapy of Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg. In 
press. 

Blair, E., Esmond, W. G., Attar, S., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Experimental Aspects of the 
Use of Hyperbaric Oxygen in Hemorrhagic 
Shock, An,. Surg., 30: 243, 1964. 

Blair. E., Hexxixg, G., Hornick, R., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hypothermia in Bacteremic 
Shock, Arch. Surg., 89: 619-629, 1964. 

Blair. E., Xvgren, E., and Cowley, R. A. : 
A Spiral Wire Technique for Producing 
Gradually Occlusive Coronary Thrombosis, 
/. Thorac. Cardiov. Surg., 48: 476-485, 1964. 

Blair, E., and Ollodart, R. : High Pressure 
Oxygen as an Adjunct in Experimental 
Bacteremic Shock, J.A.M.A., 191: 736-739, 
1965. 

Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., Gutierreg, and 
Esmond, W. G. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
Massive Pulmonary Embolism, Dis. Chest, 
46: 537,1964. 



Bl.air. E. : Clinical Hy/'othennia, McGraw- 
Hill, New York, 1964. 

Blair, E. : Chapter on Physiologic Effects of 
Hypothermia for Textbook on Veterinary 
Anesthesia, Williams and Wilkins Co., Balti- 
more. 

Blair, E. : Chapter on Hypothermia in Lewis' 
Practice of Surgery. 

Blair, E., Attar, S., Ollodart, R., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
the Treatment of Experimental Shock, Amcr. 
J. Surg. In press. 

Blair, E., Ollodart, R., Cowley, R. A. and 
Henning, G. : Hypoxia Resulting from Coli- 
form Infections in Animals, Natl. Acad. 
Sci. In press. 

Blair, E., .\tt.\r, S., Cowley, R. A., Gutier- 
reg, G. E., and Esmond, W. G. : Hyperbaric 
Oxygenation in Massive Pulmonary Embolism, 
Dis. Chest. 46: 537, 1964. 

Bl.\ir, E., Esmond, W. G., Attar, S., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
Massive Pulmonary Embolism, Surg. Forum, 
15: 200, 1964. 

Bl.\ir, E., Attar, S., Cowley, R. A., and 
FiscHLER, M.: Square-Wave 250 Cycle 
Cardiac Defibrillation — Use in Cardiac 
Surgery, Arch. Surg., 90: 29, 1965. 

Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., Attar, S., Esmond. 
W. G., MicHAELis, M., and Ollodart. R. : 
Prevention and Treatment of Shock by Hyper- 
baric Oxygenation, Ann. AM'. Acad. Sci.. 
117: 673, 1965. 

Blair, E., Att.\r. S., Henning, G., Esmond. 
W. G., Cowley, R. A., and Michaelis, M. : 
The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation 
(OHP) on Three Forms of Shock — Trau- 
matic, Hemorrhagic and Septic, /. Trauma. 
4: 652, 1964. 

Blair, E., Attar, S., and Esmond, W. G. : 
The Effect of Hypothermia on Lung Function, 
Ann. Surg., 100: 814, 1964. 

Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., Att.\r. S., and 
Esmond, W. G. : Hyfcrbaric O.rygcn in 
Shock in Shock-Hy('olension, Grune and 
Stratton, 1965. 

Blair, E., Attar, S., Esmond, W. G., and 
Cowley, R. A. : The Utilization of Hyper- 
baric Oxygenation in Hemorrhagic Shock, 
in Clinical Application of Hyperbaric O.ry- 
genation, Elsevier Publication Co., Amster- 
dam, 1964. 

Blair, E., .Att.vr. S., Oli.od.\rt. R., Esmond, 



To/. 5L Ni 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



\V. G., and Cowlev, R. A.: Tlic Effect of 
Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Bacteremic 
Shock, Circulation. 29: 135-139, 1964. 

Bloedorx, F. G., Li.nberg, E. J., Cowley, R. A., 
CucciA, C. A., Mercado, R., and Wizenberg. 
M. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in Broncho- 
genic Carcinoma, Amcr. J. Rocnigoi.. 92: 
77, 1964. 

Bloeuorx, F. G., Cowley, R. .\., Linberg, E. J., 
and Wizenberg. M. J. : Bronchogenic Carci- 
noma Further Experience with Preoperative 
Irradiation, /. Thorac. Cardiot: Surg. In 
press. 

Bi'.XTo.v. R.. Cowley. R. .A., Blair, E., Mans- 
berger, A. R., and .\tt.\r, S. : The Therapy 
of Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Blxtox, R., Blair, E., and Crowley, R. A.: 
Hyi)erbaric Oxygenation in the Treatment of 
Experimental Shock, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Carski. T.. Fraxzoxe, J., Lewitixx, A., 
Cowley, R. A., Esmond, W. G., Kaestxer. 
R.. HcRDLE, E., and Baker. B. : Reliability 
Engineering for Open Heart Surgery, Bull. 
Sch. Med. Uniz: Maryland, Oct., 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Esmoxd, W. G., Hexxixg, G., 
Blair, E., Attar, S., and Michaelis, M. : 
The Effect of Hyperbaric O.xygenation 
(OHP) on Three Forms of Shock — Trau- 
matic, Hemorrhagic and Septic, /. Trainua, 
4: 652, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Attar, S., Blair, E., and 
Esmond. W. G. : Hyperbaric O.rygcn in 
Shock in Shock-Hyj^otcnsion. Grune and 
Stratton, 1965. 

Cowley, R. A.. Esmoxd. W. G., Bl.\ir, E., and 
Attar, S. : The Utilization of Hyperbaric 
Oxygenation in Hemorrhagic Shock, in 
Clinical Application of Hyperbaric 0.rygcna- 
tion, Elsevier Publ. Co., Amsterdam, 1964. 

CowLEY% R. A., Beech, A., Maxsberger, A. R., 
and Attar, S. : The Possible Relationship of 
Certain Chromatographic Changes to Coagu- 
lation Aberrations in Hypotensive Patients, 
.1. Trauma . 5: 90, 1965. 

Cowley, R. A., Esmond, W. G., Ollodart, R., 
Blair. E., and Attar, S. : The Effect of 
Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Bacteremic 
Shock, Circulation, 29: 135-139, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Esmoxd, W. G., and 
Attar, S. : Experimental Aspects of the 
Use of Hyperbaric Oxygen in Hemorrhagic 
Shock, Amer. Surg., 30: 243, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Esmoxd. W. G., and 



.\ttar, S. : The Effect of Hypothermia on 
Lung Function, .Inn. Surg., 160: 814-823, 
1964. 

Cowley, R. .A., Horxick, R., Hexxixg, G., and 
Blair, E. : Hypothermia in Bacteremic 
Shock, Arch. Surg., 89: 619-629, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Nygren, E., and Blair, E. : A 
Spiral Wire Technique for Producing Gradu- 
ally Occlusive Coronary Thrombosis, /. 
Thorac. Cardial: Surg., 48: 476-485, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Gutierreg, and 
Esmond, W. G. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
Massive Pulmonary Embolism, Dis. Chest, 
46:537, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Es.moxd, W. G., Lewitixx. A., 
Franzone, J., Carski, T., Kaestxer, R., 
Hurdle, E., and Baker, B. : Reliability 
Engineering for Open Heart Surgery, Bull. 
Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, Oct., 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Maxsberger, A. R., 
Attar, S., and Buxton, R. : The Therapy of 
Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., McLaughlin, J., Ollodart, R., 
Maxsberger, A. R., and Attar, S. : A Physio- 
logic Approach to the Correction of Hypo- 
tension, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Masaitis, C, Kirby, W. H., 
Maxsberger, A. R., and Attar, S. : The 
Effect of Hemorrhagic Shock on Clotting 
Time in Humans, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Kirby, W. H., Masaitis, C, 
Iraxi, B., Maxsberger, A. R., and Attar, S. : 
II, The Behavior of Fibrogen in Clinical 
Septic Shock. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Maxsberger, A. R., Masaitis, 
C. A., Irani, B., Kirby, W. G., and Attar, 
S. : III, The Effect of Septic Shock in Clotting 
Time in Humans, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., and Attar, S. : Re-evaluation 
of Hyperbaric Oxygenation in Hemorrhagic 
Shock, Surg. Forum, 16: 1965. In press. 

CowLEY', R. A., Haxkixs, J., and Attar, S. : 
Emergency Repair of Antriogenic Mitral In- 
sufficiency, /. Thorac. Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Ollodart, R., Blair, E., and 
Attar, S. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in the 
Treatment of Experimental Shock, Amer. J. 
Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Ollodart, R., Blair, E., and 
Hexxixg., G. : Hypoxia Resulting from Coli- 
form Infections in .Animals, Natl. Acad. Sci. 
In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Herman-, R., and Blair. E. : 



July, 1966 



WLLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UXU'ERSITV OF MARYLAND 



Interventricular Septal Defect in Identical 
Twins, /. Thorac Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

CowLEV, R. A., Blair, E., and Tait, M. K. : 
Lactacidemia from Septic Shock in Man, 
Amcr. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., and Buxtox, R. : 
Hyperbaric Oxygenation in the Treatment of 
Experimental Shock, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Bloedorn, F. G., Linberg, 
E. J., Cuccia, C. A., Mercado, R., and 
Wizenberg, M. J. : Preoperative Irradiation 
in Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Amcr. J. 
Roentgen., 92: 77, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Lanzi, J., McLaughlik, J., 
and LiNBERG, E. J. : Traumatic Intercostal 
Arteriovenous Fistula: Case Report, Ann. 
Surg., 161: 218, 1965. 

Cowley, R. A., Linberg, E. J., Bloedorn. F., 
and Wizenberg, M. J. : Bronchogenic Carci- 
noma Further Experience with Preoperative 
Irradiation, /. Tlwrac. Cardiov. Surg. In 
press. 

Cowley, R. A., Lyons, J., Hankins, J., 
Singleton, R., and Linberg, E. J. : Congeni- 
tal Anomalies of the Pulmonary Arteries, 
/. Thorac. Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Attar, S., Gutier- 
reg, G. E., and Esmond, W. G. : Hyperbaric 
Oxygenation in Massive Pulmonary Embol- 
ism, Dis. Chest, 46: 537, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., Esmond, W. G., and 
Attar, S. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
Massive Pulmonary Embolism, Surg. Forum. 
15: 200, 1964. 

Cowley, R. A., Blair, E.. Attar, S., and 
Fischler, M. : Square-Wave 250 Cycle 
Cardiac Defibrillation — Use in Cardiac 
Surgery, Arch. Stirg., 90: 29, 1965. 

Cowley, R. A., Attar, S., Blair. E., Esmond, 
W. G., MiCHAELis, M., and Ollodart. R. : 
Prevention and Treatment of Shock by Hyper- 
baric Oxygenation, Ann. N^.Y. Acad. Sci.. 
117: 673, 1965. 

Cuccia, C. A., Cowley, R. A., Bloedorn, F. G.. 
Linberg, E. J., Mercado, R., and Wizenberg, 
M. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in Broncho- 
genic Carcinoma, Amcr. J. Roentgen., 92: 
77, 1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Attar, S., Blair, E., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Experimental Aspects of the 
Use of Hyperbaric Oxygen in Hemorrhagic 
Shock, Amer. Surg., 30: 243, 1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Cowley, R. A., Lewitinn, A., 



Franzone. J., Carski, T., Kaestner, R., 
Hurdle, E., and Baker, B. : Reliability 
Engineering for Open Heart Surgery, Bull. 
Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, Oct., 1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Gutierreg, G. E., Cowley, 
R. A., Blair, E., and Attar. S. : Hyperbaric 
O.xygenation in Massive Pulmonary Embol- 
ism, Dis. Chest, 46: 537, 1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Attar, S., Blair, E., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hyperbaric Oxygenation in 
Massive Pulmonary Embolism, Surg. Forum, 
15: 200, 1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., 
Attar, S., Michaelis, M., and Ollodart, R. : 
Prevention and Treatment of Shock by Hyper- 
baric Oxygenation, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 
117: 673, 1965. 

Esmond, W. G., Henning, G., Blair, E., Attar, 
S., Cowley, R. A., and Michaelis, M. : The 
Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation (OHP) 
on Three Forms of Shock — Traumatic, 
Hemorrhagic and Septic, /. Trauma, 4: 
652, 1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Blair. E., and -Attar. S. : The 
Eflfect of Hypothermia on Lung Function, 
Ann. Surg.. 100: 814, 1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., 
and Attar, S. : Hyperbaric Oxygen in Shock 
in Shock-Hypotension, Grune and Stratton, 
1965. 

Esmond, W. G., Blair. E., Attar, S., and 
Cowley, R. A. : The L^tilization of Hyper- 
baric Oxygenation in Hemorrhagic Shock, in 
Clinical Application of Hyperbaric Oxygena- 
tion, Elsevier Publication Co., Amsterdam, 
1964. 

Esmond, W. G., Ollodart, R., Blair, E., Att.\r, 
S., and Cowley, R. A. : The Effect of Hyper- 
baric Oxygenation in Bacteremic Shock, 
Circulation, 29: 135-139. 1964. 

Fischler. M., Cowley, R. A., Blair, E., and 
Attar. S. : Square- Wave 250 Cycle Cardiac 
Defibrillation — L^se in Cardiac Surgery, Arch. 
Surg.. 90: 29, 1965. 

Franzone, J., Lewitinn, A., Cowley, R. A., 
Esmond, W. G., Carski, T., Kaestner, R., 
Hurdle. E., and Baker, B. : Reliability Engi- 
neering for Open Heart Surgery, Bull. Sch. 
Med. Univ. Maryland, Oct., 1964. 

Gutierreg. G. E., Co\vlev, R. A., Blair, E., 
Attar, S., and Esmond. W. G. : Hyperbaric 
O.xygenation in Massive Pulmonary Embol- 
ism, Dis. Chest. 46: 537, 1964. 



I'ol. 51, No. 3 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



IIaxkins. J., Singleton. R., Linberg, E. J., 
Lyons, J., and Cowley, R. A. : Congenital 
Anomalies of the Pulmonary Arteries, /. 
Thorac. Cardial'. Surg. In press. 

H.\XKINS, J., and Linberg, E. J. : Tracheo- 
bronchial Obstruction Caused by an .•\berrant 
Left Pulmonary Artery. In preparation. 

H.^NKiNS. J., Att.-kr, S., and Cowley, R. A. : 
Emergency Repair of Antriogenic Mitral In- 
sufficiency, /. Tlwrac. Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

Henning, G., Blair, E., Attar, S., Esmond, 
W. G., Cowlev, R. a., and Michaelis, M. : 
The Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygenation 
(OHP) on Three Forms of Shock — Trau- 
matic, Hemorrhagic and Septic, J. Trauma, 
4:652, 1964. 

Hex.xixg, G., Cowley, R. A., Ollodart. R., 
and Blair, E. : Hypo.xia Resulting from 
Coliform Infections in Animals, Xall. Acad. 
Sci. In press. 

Hex^xing, G., Blair. E., Horxick. R., and 
Cowley. R. A.: Hypothermia in Bacteremic 
Shock, Arch. Surg., 89: 619-629, 1964. 

Her.max, R., Blair, E., and Cowley, R. A. : 
Interventicular Septal Defect in Identical 
Twins, /. Thorac. Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

Horxick, R.. Hexxing, G., Blair, E., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Hypothermia in Bacteremic 
Sliock, Arch. Surg., 89: 619-629, 1964. 

Hurdle, E., Kaestner, R., C.\rski, T., Fran- 
zoxe, J., Lewitixx, a., Cowley, R. A., 
Esmond, W. G., and Baker, B. : Reliability 
Engineering for Open Heart Surgery, Bull. 
Sch. Med. Univ. Maryland, Oct., 1964. 

Irani, B., Mansberger, A. R., Att.\r, S., 
Masaitis, C, Kirby, W. H., and Cowley, 
R. A. : II, The Behavior of Fibrogen in 
Clinical Septic Shock. In press. 

Iraxi, B., Kirby', W. G., Attar, S., AIasaitis, 
C. A., Mansberger, A. R., and Cowley, 
R. A.: Ill, The Effect of Septic Shock in 
Clotting Time in Humans, Ann. Surg. In 
press. 

JiTi. R., Lixberg, E. J., Sacks, M., and Spurl- 
ixG, R. : Failure of Thymectomy in the Treat- 
ment of Acute Human Leukemia, Blood. In 
press. 

Kaestner, R., C.-\rski, T., Fraxzone, J., 
Lewitixn, a., Cowley, R. A., Esmond, 
\\'. G., Hurdle, E., and Baker, B. : Re- 
liability Engineering for Open Heart Surgery, 
Bull. Sch. Med. Uni'j. Maryland, Oct., 1964. 

Kirby, W. H., Mansberger. A. .\,. Attar, S., 



Masaitis. C, and Cowley, R. A.: The Effect 
of Hemorrhagic Shock on Clotting Time in 
Humans, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Kirby, W. H., Masaitis, C, Irani, B., Mans- 
berger, A. R., -Attar, S., and Cowley, R. A. : 
II, The Behavior of Fibrogen in Clinical 
Septic Shock. In press. 

Kirby, \V. G., Attar, S., Iraxi, B., Masaitis, 
C. A., Mansberger, A. R., and Cowley, 
R. A.: Ill, The Effect of Septic Shock on 
Clotting Time in Humans, Ann. Surg. In 
press. 

Laxzi, J., McLaughlix, J., Linberg, E. J., 
and Cowley, R. A. : Traumatic Intercostal 
Arteriovenous Fistula : Case Report, Ann. 
Surg., 161: 218, 1965. 

Lewitixx, A., Cowley, R. A., Esmond, W. G., 
Fraxzone, J., Carski, T., Kj\estxer, R., 
Hurdle, E., and Baker, B. : Reliability Engi- 
neering for Open Heart Surgery, Bull. Sch. 
Med. Univ. Maryland, Oct., 1964. 

Lixberg, E. J., Bloedorn, F. G., Cowley, R. A., 
CucciA, C. A., Mercado, R., and Wizenberg, 
M. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in Broncho- 
genic Carcinoma, Anicr. J. Roentgen. 92: 77, 
1964. 

Linberg. E. J., and !Max"sberger, A. R. : First 
Rib Resection for Distal E.xposure of Sub- 
clavian Vessel, Surg. Gyncc. Obstet., 120: 
579, 1965. 

Linberg, E. J., McLaughlin, J., Lanzi, J., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Traumatic Intercostal Ar- 
teriovenous Fistula: Case Report, Ann. Surg., 
161:218, 1965. 

Linberg, E. J., Cowley, R. A., Bloedorn, F., 
and Wizenberg, M. J. : Bronchogenic Carci- 
noma Further Experience with Preoperative 
Irradiation, /. Thorac. Cardiov. Surg. In 
press. 

Linberg, E. J., Jiji. R., Sacks, M., and Spurl- 
ING, R. : Failure of Thymectomy in the Treat- 
ment of Acute Human Leukemia, Blood. In 
press. 

Linberg, E. J., Singleton, R., Hankixs, J., 
Lyons, J., and Cowley, R. A. : Congenital 
Anomalies of the Pulmonary Arteries, /. 
Thorac. Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

Linberg, E. J., and Hawkins, J. : Tracheo- 
bronchial Obstruction Caused by an Aberrant 
Left Pulmonary Artery. In preparation. 

Lyons, J., Hankins, J., Singleton, R., Lin- 
berg, S. J., and Cowley, R. A. : Congenital 



/»/v. 1966 



HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY, 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Anomalies of the Pulmonary Arteries, /. 
Thorac. Cardiov. Surg. In press. 

Mansberger, a. R., and Linberg, E. J. : First 
Rib Resection for Distal Exposure of Sub- 
clavian Vessels, Surg. Gynec. Obstct., 120: 
579, 1965. 

Mansberger, A. R., Attar, S., Beech, A., and 
Cowley, R. A. : The Possible Relationship of 
Certain Chromatographic Changes to Coagu- 
lation Aberrations in Hypotensive Patients, 
/. Trauma. 5: 90, 1965. 

MA^fSBERGER, A, R., Attar, S., Blair, E., 
Cowley, R. A., and Buxton, R. : The 
Therapy of Refractory Shock, Ann. Surg. 
In press. 

Mansberger. A. R., Attar, S., Ollodart, R., 
McLaughlin, J., and Cowley, R. A. : A 
Physiologic Approach to the Correction of 
Hypotension, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Mansberger, A. R., Attar, S., Kirby, W. H., 
Masaitis, C, and Cowley, R. A. : The Effect 
of Hemorrhagic Sliock on Clotting Time in 
Humans, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Mansberger, A. R., Attar, S., Irani, B., 
Masaitis, C, Kirby, W. H., and Cowley, 
R. A.: II, The Behavior of Filirogen in 
Clinical Septic Shock. In press. 

Mansberger, A. R., Masaitis, C. A., Irani, 
B., Kirby. W. G., Attar, S., and Cowley, 
R. A.: Ill, The Effect of Septic Shock on 
Clotting Time in Humans, Ann. Surg. In 
press. 

Mansberger, A., and McLaughlin, J.: The 
Treatment of Shock. Submitted for publi- 
cation, Ann. Surg. 

Masaitis, C, Kirby, W. H., Mansberger, 
A. R., Attar, S., and Cowley, R. A. : The 
Effect of Hemorrhagic Shock on Clotting 
Time in Humans, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Masaitis, C, Irani, B., Mansberger, A. R., 
Attar, S., Kirby, W. H., and Cowley, R. A. : 
II, The Behavior of Fibrogen in Clinical 
Septic Shock. In press. 

Masaitis, C. A., Irani, B., Kirby, W. G., 
Attar, S., Mansberger, A. R., and Cowley, 
R. A.: Ill, The Effect of Septic Shock on 
Clotting Time in Humans, Ann. Surg. In 
press. 

McLaughlin, J., Linberg, E. J., Lanzi, J., and 
Cowley, R. A. : Traumatic Intercostal Ar- 
teriovenous Fistula: Case Report, Ann. Surg., 
161: 218, 1965. 

McLaughlin, J., Ollodart, R., Mansberger, 



A. R., .Attar, S., and Cowley, R. A. : A 
Physiologic Approach to the Correction of 
Hypotension, Ann. Surgery. In press. 

McLaughlin, J., and Mansberger, .\. : Tlie 
Treatment of Shock, submitted for publication, 
.Ann. Surg. 

McLaughlin, J., and Strauch. M.; Renal 
Function in Septic Shock. In preparation. 

McLaughlin, J.: Ventricular Fibrillation from 
Digitalis Therapy : Successful Results of 99 
Episodes of Ventricular Asuptole. In prepara- 
tion. 

Mercado, R., Cuccia, C. A., Cowley, R. A., 
Bloedorn, F. G., Linberg, E. J., and Wizen- 
berg, M. J. : Preoperative Irradiation in 
Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Aincr. J. Roentgen, 
92: 77, 1964. 

Michaelis, M., Esmond, W. G., Blair, E., 
Cowley. R. A., .Attar, S., and Ollodart, R. : 
Prevention and Treatment of Shock by Hyper- 
baric 0.\ygenation, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 
117: 673, 1965. 

Michaelis, M., Cowley, R. .\.. Esmond, W. G., 
Henning. G., Blair, E., and Attar, S. : The 
Effect of Hyperbaric O.xygenation (OHP) 
on Three Forms of Shock — Traumatic, 
Hemorrhagic and Septic, /. Traiinui, 4: 652, 
1964. 

Nygren, E., Blair, E., and Cowley, R. ,\. : 
A Spiral Wire Technique for Producing 
Gradually Occlusive Coronary Thrombosis, 
/. Thorac. Cardiov. Surg., 48: 476-485, 1964. 

Ollodart. R., Michaelis, M., Esmond, W. G., 
Blair, E., Cowley, R. A., and Attar, S. : 
Prevention and Treatment of Shock by Hyper- 
baric O.xygenation, Ann. A'.)'. Acad. Set., 117: 
673, 1965. 

Ollodart, R., Blair, E., .Attar, S., Esmond, 
W. G., and Cowley, R. A. : The Effect of 
Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Bacteremic 
Shock, Circulation, 29: 135-139, 1964. 

Ollodart. R., and Blair, E. : High Pressure 
Oxygen as an .Adjunct in Experimental 
Bacteremic Shock, J. A.M. A.. 191: 736-739, 
1965. 

Ollodart, R., Mansberger, A. R., Attar, S., 
McLaughlin, J., and Cowley, R. A. : A 
Physiologic Approach to the Correction of 
Hypotension, Ann. Surg. In press. 

Ollodart. R., Blair, E., .Attar. S., and Cowley, 
R. A. : Hyperbaric O.xygenation in the Treat- 
ment of E.xperimental Shock, Aincr. J. Surg. 
In press. 



;■',./. .'ii. A',-. 3 



MEniCAI. SCHOOL SECTIOX 



I ii i.ouAKT, R., Bi.AiR, E., CowiEv, R. A., and 
IIexnmng, G. : Hypoxia Resulting from Coli- 
I'orm Infections in Animals, A'li//. Acad. 

Sci. In press. 

I 

I Sacks. M., Jiji. R.. Linhkkg. E. J., and .Si'im.- 
i.\"G. R. : Failure of Thymectomy in the Treat- 
ment of Acute Human Leukemia, Blond. In 
press. 

! Sl.NCLETO.V. R.. LiNBERG, E. J., HaNKI.V.S. J., 

' Lyons. J., and Cowley, R. A.: Congenital 
Anomalies of the Pulmonary Arteries. /. 
Thonic. Cardial: Surg. In press. 

Spurling. R., Sacks. M., Jiji, R., and Lix- 
BERG, E. J.: Failure of Thymectomy in the 
I Treatment of .\cutc Human Leukemia, Blood. 

In press. 

I Straucii. M.. and McLaughlin, J.: Renal 
I Function in Septic Shock. In preparation. 

Tait, M. K., Cowley, R. A., and Blair. E. : 
Lactacidemia from Septic Shock in Man, 
Amcr. Surg. In press. 

WizEXBERG, M. J., Mercado, R., Cuccia, C. A., 

1 Cowley, R. A., Bloedorx, F. G., and Lix- 

BERG. E. J.: Preoperative Irradiation in 

I Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Amcr. J. Roentgen., 

\ 92: 7, 1964. 

! WizEXBERC, M. J.. Bloedorx, F. G., Cowley, 

R. A., and Lixberg. E. J.: Bronchogenic 

i Carcinoma Further Experience with Pre- 

I operative Irradiation, /. Thorac. Cardiov. 

Surg. In press. 



Division of Urologic Surgery 

Aledia, F. T., and Young, J. D., Jr. : Further 
Observations on Flank Cutaneous Ureter- 
ostomy and Transureteroureterostomy as a 
Means of L'rinary Diversion, presented at 
Meeting of American Association of Genito- 
urinary Surgeons, May, 1965, New Orleans. 
To be published in Trans. Amcr. Ass. Geni- 
tourin. Surg. 

Beyer, O., Youxg, J. D., Jr., Galleher, E. P., 
Jr., Bloedorn, F. G., and Dou, J. : Supravolt- 
age Irradiation Followed by Cystectomy, J. 
Urol. In press. 

Bloedorn, F. G., Beyer, O., Young, J. D., Jr., 
Galleher, E. P., and Dou, J. : Supervolt- 
age Irradiation Followed by Cystectomy, /. 
Urol. In press. 

Dou, J., Bloedorx, F. G., Beyer, O., Young, 



J. D., Jr., and (iAlleher, E. P., Jr.: Supra- 
voltage Irradiation Followed by Cystectomy, 
J. Urol. In press. 

Galleher, E. P., Jr., Young, J. D., Jr., Beyer, 
O., Bloedorn, F. G., and Dou, J. : Supervolt- 
age Irradiation Followed by Cystectomy, /. 
Urol. In press. 

Galleher, E, P., Jr., McCuxe, W. R., and 
Wood, C. : Leiomyoma of the Kidney in a 
Newborn Infant, /. Urol., 91 : June, 1964. 

Kiser, W. S., and Young. J. D., Jr.: Ob- 
struction of the Lower Ureter by Aberrant 
Blood N'essels, presented at Meeting of Mid- 
Atlantic Section of A \] A, Williamsburg, 
X'irginia, Nov., 1964, /. Urol. Accepted for 
publication. 

Maxsberger, A., Jr., and Young, J. D., Jr. : 
Ammonia Levels as an Aid to Diagnosis of 
Urinary Extravasation, presented at Meeting 
of Mid-Atlantic Section A U A, Williamsburg, 
Virginia, Nov., 1964, /. Urol. Accepted for 
publication. 

McCuxE, W. R., Galleher, E. P., Jr., and 
Wood, C. : Leiomyoma of the Kidney in a 
Newborn Infant, /. Urol., 91: June, 1964. 

Wood. C, Galleher, E. P., Jr., and McCune, 
W. R. : Leiomyoma of the Kidney in a New- 
born Infant, /. Urol., 91: June, 1964. 

Young, J. D., Jr., Galleher, E. P., Jr., Beyer, 
O., Bloedorn, F. G., and Dou, J. : Supravolt- 
age Irradiation Followed by Cystectomy, /. 
Urol. In press. 

Y'ouNG, J. D., Jr., and Kiser, W. S. : Ob- 
struction of the Lower Ureter by Aberrant 
Blood Vessels, presented at Meeting of Mid- 
Atlantic Section of A U A, Williamsburg, 
Virginia, Nov., 1964, /. Urol. Accepted for 
publication. 

Y'oUNG, J. D., and Mansberger, A., Jr.: Am- 
monia Levels as an Aid to Diagnosis of 
Urinary Extravasation, presented at Meet- 
ing of Mid-Atlantic Section A U A, Williams- 
burg, Virginia, Nov., 1964, /. Urol. Accepted 
for publication. 

Young, J. D., Jr., and Aledia, F. T. : Further 
Observations on Flank Cutaneous Ureter- 
ostomy and Transureteroureterostomy as a 
Means of Urinary Diversion, presented at 
Meeting of American Association of Genito- 
urinary Surgeons, New' Orleans, May, 1963. 
To be published in Trans. Amcr. Ass. Gcni- 
tourin. Surg. 



July, 1966 



xli 



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through AMEF 



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535 North Dearborn Stree 
Chicago 10, Illinois 



Vol. M. -V... 3 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
SECTION 



OFFICERS 
President 

Howard B. Mays. M.D. 

President-Elect 

John O. SllARRKTr. M.I), 

Vice-Presidents 
I!f.x;ami.n M. SiEix. .M.D. 
I'atricia Dodd, M.U. 
Raymond M. Cvxxixgham. M.D 



Aliiiiiiii Day, May 6, 1966 

Ihc annual meeting and scicntilk pro- 
gram of the Medical Alumni Association 
was held in 1966 in conjunction with the 
bi-annual meetings of the University Hos- 
pital Medical and Surgical Associations 
which included the University of Maryland 
Medical Association, the Douglass Ob- 
stetrical and Gynecological Society, the 
Bradley Pediatric Society, and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Surgical Society. 
Scientific programs were under the super- 
vision of committees of these organiza- 
tions. Those registering for the Alumni 
Day activities included the following: 



Kardasu. M.D. 



Class of 1908 



Executive Director 

Wn.i.iAM H. Tritl 



Executive Secretary 
.Mrs. Locise Girkix 

Board of Directors 

William H. Kammer, Jr., M.D. 
Robert B. Goldstein. M.D. 
JoHX D. Yoixc. M.D. 
Harry C. Bowie. M.D. 
Theodore Stacy. ^r.D. 
WilfordH.To\vxshexd..Tr.,M.D. 
Joiix C. Di-MLER. Sr.. M.D. 
\V. Kexxeth Maxsfield, M.D. 
T. Howard Fraxz. M.D. 

C. Parke Scaeboroigh, M.D. 

(rx-officio) 

Nominating Committee 

J. Howard Fraxz. M.D. 
(cx-offich) 

C. Parke Scarborough, M.D, 
(cx-officioj 

D. McClelland Dixon, M.D. 
James R. K.^rns, M.D. 
Edward F, Cotter, M.D. 



Lester D. Norris 



Class of 1910 



John G. Runkel 



Class of 1911 (P&S) 
John F. Hogan W. T. Gocke 



Class of 1914 



Austin H. Wood 



Class of 1915 



W. R. McKenzie 



Class of 1916 



Geo. A. Bawden 
Edward H. Benson 
Chas. R. Brooke 
B. Bruce Brumbaugh 
Henry F. Buettner 
Michael E. Cavallo 
Lucien R. Chaput 
Harry Goldmann 
Bowers H. Growt 



Chas. H. Lupton 
Geo. McLean 
Vincent J. Oddo 
Guy R. Post 
Chas. A. Reifschneider 
F. Fred Ruzicka 
Wilbur T. Shirkey, Jr. 
Maurice C. Wentz 



Class of 1917 



Louis Krause 



Howard B. Mays, M.D. 
(ex-officio) 



Class of 1918 



John M. Nicklas 



Representatives to 
Faculty Board 

To be named. 

C3-year term began June, 1965) 
C, Parke Scarborough, M,D. 
Howard B, Mays, M.D. 



Class of 1921 
Thomas O'Rourk F. S. Shubert 

Class of 1922 
Joseph S. Stovin T. N. Wilson 

Class of 1925 
Samuel S. Glick Joseph Nataro 



July. 1966 



xliii 



^ULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. U.Ml'ERSITV OF MARYLAND 



Class of 1926 



Solomon B. Zinkin 



John A. Askin 
Margaret B. Ballard 
Henrv DeVincentis 
David M. Helfond 
Louis T. Lavy 
H. E. Levin 
Joseph Levin 



A. H. Finkelstein 



Walter C. Merkel 
William C. Polsue 
Albert A. ({osenberg 
William Schuman 
Elizabeth Sherman 
Frank Spano 



Class of 1929 
Leroy S. Heck George H. Yeager 

Class of 1930 
Zack A. Owens L. R. Schoolman 



of 1931 

Waldo B. Movers 
E. A. Schimunek 
Wm. M. Seabold 
Harry S. Shelley 
Arthur G. Siwinski 
Michael Skovron 
R. A. Stevens 
W. A. \anOrnier 
Henry Wigderson 



Class 
E. L Baumgartner 
W. C. Boggs 
Donald B. Grove 
Samuel A. Feldman 
K. M. Hornbrook 
Abraham Karger 
Max Kaufman 
Walter Kohn 
Jerome L. Krieger 
Alston G. Lanham 

Class of 1932 
Harry C. Hull Louis F. Klimes 

Arthur Karfgin Stephen L Rosenthal 

Class of 1934 
Robert W. Farr John N. Snyder 

Reuben Leass 

Class of 1933 
Edward F. Cotter Howard B. Mays 

John Godbey Karl F. .Mech 

Josiah A. Hunt L. K. Woodward, Jr. 



Class 
Milton Bernstein 
Harry C. Bowie 
McClelland Dixon 
Wm. Greifinger 
J. W. Gordner 
Ben Isaacs 
C. Henrv Jones 
W. E. Karfgin 
Saul Karpel 
Howard T. Knobloch 
Louis J. Kolodner 
Robert M. Lowman 



of 193G 

W. K. Mansfield 
James P. .Morgan 
Benjamin B. Moses 
Jos. R. .Mverowitz 
S. D. Pentecost 
Milton H. Stapen 
Morris H. Stern 
Lsaac Terr 
Lawrence Tiernev 
Gibson J. Wells 
Nathan Wolf 
Joseph G. Zimring 



Class of 1937 
S. T. R. Revell, Jr. Isadore Kaplan 



Thomas .\bbott 



C. Parke Scarborough 



Class of 1938 
John A. Wagner T. E. Woodward 

Class of 1939 
Henry \. Briele Wm. H. Kammer, Jr. 

R. M. Cunningham 

Class of 19-fO 
Lester H. Caplan H. P. >Iaccubbin 

Edwin O. Daue, Jr. Ross Z. Pierpont 



Benj. H. Inloes. Jr. 
James R. Karns 

Class of 1941 
Pierson M. Checket Christian F. Richter 



LeRoy G. Cooper 
Joseph V. Crecca 
yi. L. De Vincent is 
Anthony F. Di F^aula 
Julius Gelber 
T. F. Lusbv 



E. L. Seigman 
E. P. Shannon 
Joseph C. Sheehan 
Tracv X. Spencer 
J. H. Walker 
Elizabeth B. Sherrill 



Ydalia Ortiz Freeman John D. Young, Jr. 
C. E. Pruitt 

Class of 1943 
Elizabeth Acton H. B. Parry 

Ruth Baldwin David R. Will 

Class of 1944 
John M. Bloxom, HI W. C. Ebeling 
R. C. Cloninger Donald Mintzer 

R. A. Cowley 

Class of 194.5 
John M. Dennis Paul R. Myers 

Joseph B. Ganey Stanley A. Steinbach 

Class 
Robert E. Bauer 
Harold V. Cano 
Thomas B. Connor 
Paul E. Frye 
John R. Gamble, Jr. 
William D. Gentry 
James J. Gerlach 
H. William Gray 
Duane Greenfield 
Edwin O. Hendrickson 
Jay Hansen 
Charles W. Hawkins 
Charles A. Hefner 
Harry E. Hill 
E. R. Jennings 
Herbert J. Levickas 

Class of 1947 
Arlie R. Mansberger Jose G. Valderas 
William R. Post 

Class of 1948 
George V. Hamrick Norman Tarr 
Katharine V. Kemp William S. Womack 
Kyle Y. Swisher 

Class of 1949 
Edmund B. Middleton 

Class of 1950 
Paul F. Richardson Bate C. Toms, Jr. 

Class of 1951 

E. M. Beardsley Mario Garcia-Palmieri 
William G. Esmond Henry D. Perry 
Charles K. Ferguson H. Gray Reeves 

F. Sidnev Gardner, Jr. C. P. Watson 

Leo H. Ley, Jr. H. P. Wheelwright 

Donald J. Myers 

Class of 19.52 
Michael J. Foley Richard Sindler 

Class of 19.53 
William S. Kiser 



of 1946 

Ravmond L. Markley 

C. E. McWilliams 

Earl R. Paul 

John C. Rawlings 

Ralph A. Reiter 

R. C. Rossberg 

F. A. Shallenberger, 

Jr. 
Edward P. Smith. Jr. 
James A. Sewell 
Clint Stallard, Jr. 
Leon Toby 
James A. Vaughn, Jr. 
Irl J. Wentz 
Joseph Workman 



xliv 



{ ■»/. 



-V-*. 3 



.ILL MM .ISSOCIATIOX Sl-X lldX 



Clas 
Robert S. Donoho 
Robert IJ. Goldstein 



of 1!I54 

John F. Hartman 

Harold U. Weiss 



Class of I'JoB 



John B. Littleton 
(.'. Patrick Laushlin 
Gerald Maggid 
Joseph S. McLaughlin 
Lamont Osteen 
Gerald Shuster 
Paul V. Slater 



1). G. Anderson 
Richard Belgrad 
T. R. Carski 
James T. Estes 
R. A. Finegold 
Alfred W. (Jrigoleit 
Webb S. Hersperger 
Albert N'. Kanner 

Class of 1957 
Milton L. Engnoth Carl Jalenko, III 
\incent J. Fiocco, Jr. David P. Largey 

Class of 1958 
Thomas Crawford Philip J. Ferris 

R. J. Donovan, Jr. R. H. Johnson 

Class of 1959 
Robert J. Dawson Hans R. Wilhelmsen 

R. J. Thomas 

Class of 1960 
Neil A. Robinson 

Class of 1961 
Carl F. Berner G. C. Kempthorne 

Jams J. Cerda Michael B. A. Oldstone 

Francis A. Clark. Jr. George E. Urban, Jr. 

Class of 1962 
Ian R. Anderson George C. Schmieler 

Class of 1963 
Robert M. Byers Philip A. Insley, Jr. 

Class of 1964 
Dominic H. Culotta Marston A. Young 

Class of 1965 
Fred V. Cole, Jr. A. H. Khazei 

NON ALUMNI REGISTERED AT 1966 
MARYLAND MEDICAL REUNION 



Safuh .\ttar 
Baltimore, Md. 

John L. Atkins 
York, Pa. 

Samuel P. Bessman 
Baltimore, Md. 

Emil Blair 
Baltimore, Md. 

J. Edmund Bradley 
Brewster, Mass. 

Otto C. Brantigan 
Baltimore, Md. 

Milton S. Grossman 
Ellicott City, Md. 

E. H. LaBrosse 
Ellicott City, Md, 



Douglas R. Cain 
Baltimore, Md. 

Paul M. DiGiorgi 
New York, N. Y. 

Bahran Erfan 
Randallstown, Md. 

Frank H. J. Figge 
Baltimore, Md, 

Michael K, Finegan 
Baltimore, Md. 

C. Thomas Flotte 
Baltimore, Md. 

William B. Rever, Jr. 
Baltimore, ^Id. 

Beverly L. Reynolds 
Dallas, Texas 



Allan Ronald 
Seattle, Wash. 

(i. Edward Simons, Jr. 
Seattle, Wash. 

Conover Talbot 
Chicago, 111. 

Jose Valdes 
Cumberland, .Md. 



Yu Chen Lee 
Baltimore, Md. 

William I). L\nn 
Baltimore, Md. 

Fitzhugh Mullins 
Louisville, Ky, 

Neil Novin 
Baltimore, Md. 

Fausto .M. Prezioso 
Timonium, Md. 



The program began officially at 8:45 A.M. 
on Friday, May 6, 1966 with the welcoming 
address by Dr. William S. Stone and an 
address entitled ""Medicare"" delivered by 
Mr. Robert M. Ball, Commissioner of the 
Social Security Administration, an address 
of great interest to the visiting physicians 
present. This was followed immediately by 
sectional scientific sessions, the morning be- 
ing concluded with the annual alumni busi- 
ness meeting in Chemical Hall with Dr. C. 
Parke Scarborough, President of the Medical 
Alumni Association, presiding. At this meet- 
ing, it was intended to present the Annual 
Award to Dr. T. Nelson Carey; however, 
President Scarborough announced that he 
had had the honor of presenting the medal 
to Dr. T. Nelson Carey at his bedside in the 
Mercy Hospital before Dr. Carey died, A 
moment of silence was observed. 

This was then followed by the minutes 
of the previous meeting, the financial report 
and the annual election of officers. Dr. 
Howard B. Mays succeeded to the 
presidency. 

Minutes of Annual Meeting 

The annual meeting of the Medical 
Alumni Association, University of Mary- 
land took place in Chemical Hall on May 
6, 1966. The meeting was called to order 
by the President, Dr. C. Parke Scarborough, 
who welcomed back the members of the 
Alumni Association. He reported briefly 
on the condition of the Association, stating 
that the Association is now in a posiion 
to and are making plans for setting up a 
long hoped for Curriculum Vitae. The 
Board of Directors are making new plans 
for reunions at meetings about the country 
in connection with Medical and Scientific 
Meetings. It is believed that the biennial 



July, 1966 



xlv 



CAMERA VIEWS 

ALUMNI WEEK 

1966 


fl' 


/. 



Drs. Robert Farr, Arthur Karfgin, and Lewis K. Woodward. 





Drs. Theodore Kardash. Howard B. Mays, John O. Sharrett, and W. E. Karfgin 



/»/v, 1966 



xlvii 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



meetings with the Hospital Societies are 
working out very successfully. Dr. Scar- 
borough also stated that the Board of 
Directors has been working diligently. 

Dr. Scarborough introduced Dean 
William S. Stone who emphasized the re- 
lationship between Administration and the 
Alumni Association. He believes we are 
developing a relationship that is needed. 
The University is going forward in a tre- 
mendous way and is now the tenth largest 
in the USA. The campus in Catonsville will 
in the near future have an enrollment of 
25.000. Our relationship must be very close. 
At the moment a Dean of the Graduate 
School at College Park is being selected. 
Dean Stone feels that all this planning is 
proceeding in a healthy way. He hopes 
that the Alumni will work along with Ad- 
ministration. 

The Treasurer's Report was given by Dr. 
Karfgin who was happy to announce that 
we are on solid ground financially. On 
Alumni Day. June 3, 1965, he had an- 
nounced that at the beginning of that 
fiscal year May 1, 1965, we had in our 
checking account at Maryland National 
Bank $ 1,644.31 

in our savings account 

at Maryland National 

Bank 5,176.40 

in our funded reserve at 

Eutaw Savings Bank . 16,524.88 
and in our Student Loan 

Fund at Balto. Fed. 

Sav. & Loan 1,555.27 

as well as Petty Cash in 

the amount of 75.22 

A total of $24,976.08 plus 

student loans receiv- 
able in the amt. of 4,900.30 



which together total $29,876.38 

At the close of the fiscal year, April 30. 
1966 we have the following to report: 
in our checking account 
at Maryland National 
Bank $12,833.48 

in our savings account 



at Maryland National 

Bank 12,358.93 

in our funded reserve at 

Eutaw Savings Bank 18,306.71 

in our Student Loan 

Fund at Balto. Fed. 

Sav. & Loan 1,720.04 

as well as Petty Cash 

in the amount of 50.00 



A total of $45,269.16 plus 

student loans receiv- 
able in the amt. of 4,900.30 



which together total for 
the end of this fiscal 
year $50,169.46 



His report went on to explain that a great 
part of this money came in recently to 
pay for banquet and Alumni Day affairs. 
However the number of paid up members 
of the Association exceeds the number paid 
on this date on our previous best year. 

Dr. Scarborough congratulated both our 
present and past treasurers for their ex- 
cellent efforts and results. 

At the request of Dr. Scarborough the 
Necrology was read by Dr. William H. 
Triplett which began with the following 
poem, most appropriate: 

When I have bided here my little while. 
Serving my day as destiny hath planned. 
In my own way as best I understand, 
May I go calmly to my last deep sleep. 
And as the purple shadows o'er me creep 
Behold the Great Eternal with a smile; 
And may that smile be as a Good Night's 

kiss 
To loves that know no better world than 

this. 

■ — Selected. 

NECROLOGY ROSTER 

Kemp, Howard M. 
Hornstein, Abraham 
Quinn. John Francis 
O'Connor, Michael J. 
Bamberger. Beatrice 
Schmuckler, Jacob 
Doyle. John Henry 



BMC 


1911 




1911 


BMC 


1906 


BMC 


1906 




1931 




1926 


P&S 


1902 


Vol. 51. 


No. 3 



.^LUMXI ASSOCIATION SHCTIOX 



Ciill. Joseph 1-Al\\;ird 




1949 


/oiger, Samuel 




1930 


Reddig, Clarence M. 




1917 


Coleman. Joseph 




1904 


Mullan. Eugene H. 




1903 


Murgatro>d. George W. 


BMC 


1910 


Ganll. Harry B.. Jr. 




1909 


Bulla. Jefferson D. 


P&S 


1888 


tKillagher. William E. 




1917 


Reiger. Ernest M. G. 


P&S 


1915 


Sahislon. Frank 




1918 


Bishop. George W. 




1914 


Seelinger, Harr\ R. 




1910 


Harold. John A. 


P&S 


1903 


Graham. Archibald W. 




1905 


Skaggs. James W. 




1920 


Sirak, William W. 




1913 


C ohn. Charles W, 


P&S 


1908 


(Jiiintero. Ernesto 




1920 


( haffee. Orel N. 


P&S 


1906 


c loodhand, Charles L. 




1934 


(.oldstein, Albert E. 


P&S 


1912 


( .irey. T. Nelson 




1927 


\ ick. Clyde W. 


P&S 


1905 


Lehnert. Ernest C. 




1902 


Stonestreet. Washington W. 




1906 


Smith, Ziba L. 


P&S 


1906 


McConnell, Harvey R. 




1924 


Russell. John C. 




1935 


Riddick. Willard J. 




1905 


DeCormis. Joseph L. 




1903 


Kirk. George B. 


BMC 


1898 


( .ifritz. Edward A. 




1918 


1 opez. Boccanegra 




1916 


LeBlanc. William 


P&S 


1905 


Schumacher. Fred C. 


P&S 


1905 


Miller. George A. 


P&S 


1905 


Roberts. Silvia J. 


P&S 


1912 


McMullan. Joseph F. 


(Dec.) 


1943 


Pfeil. E. Thornton 


(Dec.) 


1943 


Levin. Milton 




1934 


Beck. Foster A. 




1916 


Cohen. Phillip P. 




1929 


Doshay. Lewis J. 




1922 


Davidov. Nathan J. 




1920 


Crouch, Thomas D. 




1910 


Lewis, Taylor 




1904 


Kunkowski, Mitchell F. 




1937 


Ridgely, Irwin O. 




1918 


Lennon. William E. 




1925 


Alexander. Samuel A. 




1913 


Houston. Robert E. 




1904 


Miller, Herman S. 


P&S 


1911 


Eanet, Paul 




1926 


Rousseau, James P. 




1918 


Varney. William H. 




1928 



Demarco, Vincent J. 1915 

Winslow, Fitz R. 1906 

Macke. Clarence E. 1918 

Pillsbury. Harold C. 1921 

Brown. Leo T. 1925 

Stone. William C. BMC 1903 

Dominguez, Thomas M. 1916 

Steele, Byron W. P&S 1914 

Langeluttig, H. Vernon 1931 

Granoff. Jerome F. 1924 

Robertson. Joseph R. 1910 

The president asked Dr. Gibson J. Wells 
to read the report of the Nominating Com- 
mittee, and this report follows: John O. 
Sharrett. M.D., President-elect, Benjamin 
M. Stein, M.D., Vice-President. Patricia 
Dodd, M.D., Vice-President. Raymond M. 
Cunningham. M.D.. Vice-President. Walter 
E. Karfgin. M.D.. Treasurer. Theodore 
Kardash, M.D.. Secretary. Wilford H. 
Tovvnshend, Jr.. M.D., Member of Board of 
Directors, W. Kenneth Mansfield, M.D., 
Member of Board of Directors, and John 
C. Dumler. Sr.. Member of Board of 
Directors. The president asked that this 
report be accepted. A motion was made, 
and seconded that the secretary cast a 
ballot for these nominees. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

The president asked for nominations 
from the floor for three members of the 
Nominating Committee to select nominees 
for ne.xt year. Dr. D. McClelland Dixon, Dr. 
James R. Karns, and Dr. Edward F. Cotter 
were nominated and a motion was made 
that nominations be closed. Motion was 
seconded and carried unanimously. 

Dr. Scarborough called for the report of 
the Student Loan Committee. Dr. Gibson 
J. Wells" report follows: 

May 6, 1966 

Subject: Report of Student Loan Fund 
Committee, To: Annual Business Meeting 

1. The Student Loan Fund was estab- 
lished in its present form in 1958. Loans 
are made only upon recommendation of 
the Dean"s Committee on Scholarships and 
Loans, and approval by the Medical Alumni 
Association Student Loan Committee. 

2. The recipient is not required to exe- 
cute any note or other evidence of legal 
obligation but does acknowledge, over his 



/»/v, 1966 



xlix 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



signature, that a loan in the amount of 
( X ) dollars has been received and a moral 
obligation is thus assumed. 

3. To date there has been received from 
donors to the Fund a total of $6,309.71 and 
a total of $310.63 interest has been earned 
and credited which totals receipts of 
$6,620.34. 

4. Loans, 14 in number, have been made 
to 13 individuals totaUng $4,900.30 which 
leaves a balance in the Fund of $1,720.04. 

5. The first loan was made April 27, 1959 
and the last, October 25, 1963. One re- 
cipient has made inquiry relative to repay- 
ment and has been fully advised concerning 
the simple procedure of remittance but as 
of the date of this report all loans are still 
oustanding. 

6. It is apparent that the liberality of our 
federal government with loans is more at- 
tractive to our student body in need of 
financial asistance and this is probably due 
to the fact our Fund has a fixed maximum 
of $500.00. 

7. A loan guaranteeing first semester 
tuition has been approved and will be de- 
livered upon application. 

Gibson J. Wells, M.D., Chairman 

Frank K. Morris. M.D. 

Maurice Reese, M.D. 

Now the time arrived when the Honor 
Award is usually presented. Dr. Scar- 
borough read the reply received from Dr. 
T. Nelson Carey when he was informed 
that he had been chosen to receive this 
award. He then reminded the members 
present of the quality of greatness that Dr. 
Carey possessed and of the significant 
service he had given his school. He said, 
"Dr. Carey has been called a doctor's 
doctor and he has possibly been physician 
to more Baltimore doctors than any man 
in Baltimore." He then told the story of 
the presentation made to Dr. Carey the day 
before his death occurred. Dr. Carey 
showed it to all who came in that day 
and Mrs. Carey showed it to others. 

A memoriam written by Dr. William H. 
Triplett at the request of the Board of 
Directors was read. 



In Memoriam 

In the passing of Dr. T. Nelson Carey 
the silent hall of Death received a kind, 
considerate physician, one loved by his 
patients and friends, and his professional 
associates lost a revered and loyal teammate. 

The interests and activities of Dr. Carey 
covered a wide range. Although burdened 
with a progressive physical handicap his 
courage and determination was sufficient to 
carry him forward into a busy private 
practice together with extensive hospital 
work, and closely allied with these, both 
in time and space, his ever present interest 
in teaching both undergraduates and house 
officers. 

The foundation upon which he built a 
useful life was made up of many different 
segments chief among them being intelli- 
gence, courage, compassion, understanding, 
honesty, sincerity, benevolence and loyalty. 
With it all his sense of humor was never 
failing and a ready smile of greeting an 
index to his character. 

Posterity will give its proper meed of 
praise to Nelson Carey. The good deeds he 
spread over his chosen field will live on. 

Members stood again to express their 
great appreciation of this, our recipient of 
the 1966 Honor Award. 

An announcement was made to the effect 
that when the 1,000 copies of A University 
Is Born by Dr. Margaret B. Ballard are sold 
there will be no more available. All were 
asked to get their copies before leaving the 
city. 

Election of officers took place, the secre- 
tary being asked to cast a unanimous ballot 
for all of the nominees presented earlier by 
the nominating committee. 

Theodore Kardash, M.D. 
Secretary 

Following the Annual Meeting of the 
Medical Alumni Association, the customary 
noon luncheon was served to visitors. A 
cocktail party was held at the Lord Balti- 
more Hotel, followed by the annual Alumni 
banquet. 



\\,l. 51. A'y. -? 



I 



TREASURERS REPORT OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 1966 
Annual Financial Slatcnitiil - Mav I. 1 1>6."> - A|»iil 30, 1966 

Opening Balance, May 1, 1965: 

Marxlaiul National Bank (C'lictking Account) SI .644.^1 

Mar\lancl National Bank — (Sa\ings AccomU ) 5,176.40 

iuitaw Sa\ings Bank — (Funded Reser\e) 16,524. iSS 

Baltimore l-"edcral Sa\-ings & Loan 

iStiident Loan I'und) 1 ,555 . 21 

n.\L.\NCK IN n.\NKs 824,900.86 

Plus Student Loans Receivable 4,900.30 



v$29,801.16 



Receipts Deposited, May 1, 1965 - April 30, 1966 

Dues S19.567.00 

Bulletin 8,379.00 

Alumni Da\' — Includes parts of 1965 and 1966 5,310.50 

"—Ladies' Tours (all 1966) 217.00 

Interest and Dividends 929. 13 

Individual Contributions 1 ,915.00 

.Miscellaneous 293.02 836,611.6 = 



866,412.81 



Disbursements, May 1, 1965 - April 30, 1966 

Salaries— Mrs. Girkin S 3 , 1 78 . 52 

—Extra Help 227 . 64 

Bulletin 5,000.00 

District Director Internal Revenue 922.01 

Comptroller, State of Mar\land 114.66 

Printing and Office Supplies 482 . 73 

Postage 1,070.40 

Alumni Day 4,532.66 

Honorarium 500 . 00 

Miscellaneous 214.73 816,243.35 

Closing Balance for April 30, 1966 850 , 169 . 46 

Closing Balance, April 30, 1966 

Maryland National Bank— (Checking Account) 812,833.48 

Maryland National Bank — (Savings Account) 12,358.93 

Eutaw Savings Bank — (Funded Reserve) 18,306.71 

Baltimore Federal Savings & Loan 

(Student Loan Fund) 1 , 720 . 04 

Petty Cash 50 . 00 

B.\LANCE IN BANKS 845 , 269 . 16 

Plus Student Loans Receivable 4 , 900 . 30 

850,169.46 



Pre-coiumencement and Dean's Day 



Ceremonies honoring the Class of 1966 
featured the Pre-commencement Convo- 
cation of the 159th year of the School of 
Medicine held on the campus at 2 P.M.. 
Friday June 3, 1966. 

Following the academic procession, the 
Invocation was delivered by Dr. James C. 
Thomson, Jr., Campus Ministry Coordi- 
nator. Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Vice President 
of the University for the Baltimore 
Campuses, delivered a brief greeting to the 
graduating classes, this being followed by 
vocal selections by the Glee Club of the 
School of Nursing. 

Dean Stone then presented a group of 
candidates for academic Honors which are 
listed below: 

Dr. Leonard M. Hiimmell Memorial Award, 

Gold Medal — Outstanding qiialificatioiis in 

Internal Medicine 

Kurt Porter Sligar 

Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize, for 

excellence in Genito-Vrinary Surgery 

Albert Truman Miller 

Robinson Dermatologic A ward — For excellence 

in Dermatology 

Irvin Murray Sopher 

Dr. Milton S. Sacks Memorial Award — For 

excellence in Medicine and Hematology 

Harry Louden Kiracofe 

Student Council Keys 
Charles Henry Classen 
Dwight Norbert Fortier 
Franklin Leroy Johnson 
Richard Malcolm Susel 

Student Council Certificates 
James Edward Arnold 
Charles Henry Classen 
Dwight Norbert Fortier 
Franklin Leroy Johnson 
Richard Malcolm Susel 



Students Elected to Alpha Omega Alpha 

Kurt Porter Sligar, President 

Stuart Howard Yuspa, Vice-President 

Sandra Lee Zucker, Secretary-Treasurer 

Arnold Saul Blaustein 

William David Ertag 

Richard Leroy Flax 

George Edward Gallahorn 

Stephen Barry Hameroff 

William Orville Harrison 

Larry Travis Ingle 

Harry Louden Kiracofe 

Raymond Edgar Knowles, Jr. 

Ronald Howard Koenig 

Joel Arnold Krackow 

Michael Jay Rokoff 

Irvin Murray Sopher 

Following the award of honors the 
students' wives were presented with the 
customary Mrs. M.D. citation. 

As part of the Precommencement Exer- 
cises, Mr. William J. Wiscott, Managing 
Editor of the Bulletin, was presented for 
a citation by the School of Medicine, the 
citation being reproduced herewith. 

Dean Stone then presented Mr. Wiscott 
with a silver tray inscribed as follows: 

Presented to Williaiii J. Wiscott. Man- 
aging Editor, Bulletin. School of Medi- 
cine, University of Maryland in appre- 
ciation of his efforts and thought in he- 
half of the School of Medicine. Given 
by the Faculty, March 6, 1966. 



i 



The hooding ceremony then followed 
culminating with the taking of the solemn 
Oath of Hippocrates administered by Dean 
Stone. The principal address was delivered 
by the Reverend Donald C. Kerr, Minister. 
Roland Park Presbyterian Church. Mem- 
bers of the Class of 1966 and their intern- 
ships are as follows: ■ 



Vol. .=<1. 



CIdhh of 1966 Begins Procea 
sion from DavidKC Hall. 




Class of 1966 Internships 



Abramowitz, Leslie 

Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Acker, Diane L. K. 

St. Lukes Hospital, New York, N. Y. 
Arnold, James E. 

University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Bard, Richard H. 

Cincinnati General Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Baron, Robert B. 

Mount Zion Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 
Barrash, Jay M. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Blaustein, Arnold S. 

University of Chicago Clinics, Chicago, III. 
Bosley, William R. 

Strong Memorial, Rocliester, N. Y. 
Braunohler, Walter M. 

Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, 

N.J. 
Brotman, Sheldon I. 

State U. Kings Co. Med., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Brous, Philip P. 

Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, Vt. 
Brown, Mark 

Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal. Canada 
Brownlow, Wilfred J. 

Naval Hospital, Belhesda, Md. 
Bruther. William F. 

South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, 

Md. 
Buchness, Michael P. 

Public Health Service, Staten Island, N. Y. 
Carty, James W., Jr. 

Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Clarke, Dana 

Syracuse Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 

Classen, Charles H. 

Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Cohen, Arthur 

Prog IV George Washington, Washington, 

D.C. 
Cohen, Ora R. 

Jackson Memorial, Miami, Fla. 
Collins, Hammond C. 

New England Center, Boston, Mass. 
Cook, David M. 

Parkland Memorial, Dallas, Texas 
Cost, Francis H., Jr. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 



CosTLEiGH, Robert P. 

Swedish Hospital, Seattle, Wash. 
Crist, Henry S. 

Harrishurg Hospital, Harrisburg. Pa. 
Dvoskin, Philip B. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Ellis, Michael A. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Ertag, William D. 

Montefiore Hospital, Ncm- York, N. Y. 
Fine, Stuart L. 

University Hospitcd, Baltimore. Md. 
Flax, Richard L. 

University Hospitals, Cleveland. Ohio 
Fleming, Gary A. 

South Baltimore General Hospital. Baltimore, 

Md. 

FORTIER, DWIGHT N. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
France, Joseph M., Jr. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Gallahorn, George E. 

Bellevue 3rd 4th Medical, New York, N. Y. 
Gattis, Bruce W. 

Bernalillo County, Albuquerque, N. M. 
Gerber, S. Bruce 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Gersten, Kenneth C. 

Public Health Service, Staten Island, N. Y. 
Glass, Richard S. 

Army Medical Service Hospital, Brooke 

General Hospital 
Goldberg, Marshall C. 

Public Health Service, Boston, Mass. 
Golladay, Donald E.. Jr. 

Naval Hospital, Oakland, Calif. 

GOMBART, AUGUSTIN K. 

Harrishurg Hospital, Harrishurg, Pa. 
Gordon, Dennis H. 

U. Utah Afjfil. Hospital. Salt Lake City, Utah 
Gordon, Stephen F. 

Sinai Hospital. Baltimore, Md. 
Green, John G. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Grenzer, Louis E. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Griffin, Dean H. 

Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Hameroff, Stephen B. 

South Baltimore General Hospital. Baltimore, 

Md. 



liv 



\d. 51, No. 3 



ALL MM ASSOCIATIOX SECTION 



Haney, Michael J. 

GriiJy Mcmoriiil Hospiiiil, Alhinui. Ga. 
Hanson, I. Rivers, Jr. 

York Hospital, York. Pa. 
Harrison, William O. 

Naval Hospital. Oakland. Calif. 
Hawkins, James M.. Jr. 

Memorial, Long Beach 
Hill, Thomas M. 

York Hospital. York. Pa. 
HosicK. Elizabeth C. 

Albany Hospital, Albany. N. Y. 
Ingle, Larry T. 

University of Alberta, Edmonton. Canada 
Johnson, Franklin L. 

University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Kiracofe. H. Louden 

University Hospital. Baltimore. Md. 
Knowles, Raymond E.. Jr. 

Mercy Hospital. Baltimore. Md. 
KoENio, Ronald H. 

Montefiore Hospital, New York, N. Y. 
KosKiNEN, Kenneth R. 

Maryland General Hospital. Baltimore. Md. 
Krackow. Joel A. 

Bellevtie 2nd Medical Division, New York, 

N. Y. 
Kramer. Lloyd I. 

Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Leibowitz. Robert E. 

Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta. Ga. 
Long, Elmer C, Jr. 

Allentown Hospital, Allentown. Pa. 
M.\CHiz, Stephen 

Jackson .Memorial Hospital. Miami, Fla. 
Mann, John H. 

Monmouth Medical Center. Long Branch. 

N. J. 
Marcus, Joseph B. 

Ochsner Fotindation, New Orleans. La. 
Marek, William J. 

South Baltiitiore General Hospital, Baltimore, 

Md. 
M\son, William T. 

Mercy Hospital. Baltimore, Md. 
Mattsson, Carl A. 

Thomas D. Dee Memorial. Ogden, Utah 
McCaffrey. Jane C. 

University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Miller, Albert T. 

South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, 

Md. 



Monfried, Allan J. 

Sinai Hospital, Baltimore. Md. 
Music, Stanley L 

University Hospital. Baltimore, Md. 
Oldroyd, John J. 

Army Medical Service Hospital. Walter Reed 

General Hospital 
Ominsky, Barry E. L. 

Mercy Hospital. Baltimore. Md. 
Orfuss, Carl J. 

Jackson Memorial. Miami. Fla. 
Pass, Carolyn J. 

Public Health Service, Baltimore, Md. 
Patrick, George S. 

St. Agnes, Baltimore, Md. 
Plotnick, Gary D. 

University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Press, Samuel E. 

Kaiser Foundation, Stin Francisco 
QuiNLAN, James A., Jr. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Raine, Dudley A., Jr. 

Baltiitiore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Md. 
Rawlings, Nina C. 

Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Reed, Richard H. 

South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, 

Md. 
Rivera-Rivera, Ernesto 

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, 

Puerto Rico 
Rokoff, Michael J. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Schwartz, David S. 

Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Serritella, Alfred A. 

Presbyterian St. Lukes, Chicago, 111. 
Shuger, Richard D. 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Siple, Donald J. 

San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 
Sligar, Kurt P. 

University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Sopher, Irvin M. 

University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Spence, James W. 

/// Surg., Boston University, Boston, Mass. 
Steers, John E. 

York Hospital, York, Pa. 
Steinbauer, David J. 

South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, 

Md. 



July. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNU'ERSITV OF MARYLAND 



Stern, Jack I. 

/ & 111 Med., T lifts, Boston, Mass. 
Stier, Jeffrey S. 

Beth Israel Hospital, NeH- York, N. Y. 
Stram. Robert A. 

Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, Vt. 
SusEL. Richard M. 

Public Health Service, Baltimore, Aid. 
Swan, Beresford M. 

South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, 

Md. 
Trattler, Henry L. 

Jackson Memorial Hospital. Miami, Fla. 
Wittmann. Stephen J, 

Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
Young, Robert R. 

York Hospital, York, Pa. 



YusPA. Stuart H. 

University of Pa. Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Zalewski, Andrew A. 

State U. Kings Co. Med., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ZiMMERLY. James G. 

Army Service Hospital, Walter Reed General 
Hospital 

ZucKER, Sandra L. 

University Hospital, Baltimore. Md. 



On June 4, 1966, formal graduation exer- 
cises were held at College Park with the 
awarding of diplomas. Members of the Class 
of 1966 then departed for their internships 
following a short vacation. 



/■<>/. .V. A'-i. 3 



BULLETIN School of Medicine 
Universlt// of Manj/diid 

\'t)LL'ME ^1 OCTOBER, 1966 NUMBER 4 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES Page 

Chloramphenicol Treatment of Pyogenic Meningitis .- - 43 

Ilornick. K. /v.. .1/./)., Calhu/hrr. L. R.. M.D.. Ronald. A. R.. M.D., Abdullah. J.. 
M.B.B.S.. Khan. M.A.. .\i.B.B.S.. M.R.C.. Kahit. I.. M.B.B.S. Hassan. S.. 
M.B.B.S.. Mcsser. J.. Ph.D., Shaft. M. J.. M.B.B.S.. Zahccr Ud-Din. M.B.B.S.. 
and Woodward, T. £,, M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis 

Report of a Cose 53 

Samuel S. Click. A.B.. M.D.. F.A.A.P. and Engcnc S. Bcrcston. M.D., Sc. 
(Med.). F.A.C.P. 

BOOK REVIEWS — 58 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 

Dean's Letter 

Curriculum Revision 1966 .._ 

Promotions Announced 

Foculty Notes 

Dr. Marie Andersch Retires 



OBITUARIES 

John Mason Hundley, Jr., 1891-1965 

T. Nelson Carey 1903-1966 

Albert E. Goldstein Memorial Fund Organized.. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald 1879-1966 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 

President's Letter 

Roster of Senior Alumni 

Class Notes 



INDEXES 

Vol. 49, 1964 xxxiii 

Vol. 50, 1965 xxxviii 

Vol. 51, 1966 xli 




Give to tlie 
scliool of your choice 
through AMEF 



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the nation's medical schools must hav( 
your help today. It is a physician's uniqu 
privilege and responsibility to replenish 
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Invest in the future health of the nation an 
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Chloraiiiplieiiicol Treat ineiit of 
Pvojieiiic Meningitis* 



HORNICK, R. B., M.D., GAUAGER, L. R., M.D., RONALD, A. R., M.D., ABDULLAH, J., M.B.B.S., KHAN, 
M.A., M.B.B.S., M.R.C., KHAN, I., M.B.B.S., HASSAN, S., M.B.B.S., MESSER, J., Ph.D., SHAFI, M. J., 
M.B.B.S., ZAHEER, UD-DIN, M.B.B.S., and WOODWARD, T. E., M.D., F.A.C.P. 



IN 1954. \\c reported that chloram- 
phenicol cfTcctively cured patients with 
influenzal, meningococcal, pneumococcal 
and other forms of meningitis when given 
early in the course of infection. (Parker 
ci ill. 1955.) It failed as had other anti- 
biotics when given late in illness after 
irreversible tissue changes had ensued. 
Deaths in seven of 1 11 patients treated 
were attributed to treatment delay in the 
presence of stupor, coma, and extensive 
tissue changes. 

Regimes providing multiple anti-bac- 
terial drugs have been advocated for 
patients with influenzal, meningococcal 
and pneumococcal meningitis. (Swartz 
et al. 1965.) Other investigators have 
used sulfonamides or penicillin solely for 
meningococcal infections (Dingle et al. 
1941 and Lepper et al. 1952), peni- 
cillin alone for pneumococcal meningitis 
(Swartz et al. 1965 and Lepper et al. 
1951), and chloramphenicol in influenzal 
meningitis. (Schoenbach et al. 1952 and 
McCrumb et al. 1951.) 

Our thesis, expressed a decade ago. is 
unchanged since we are not convinced 



* From the Department of lledicine and the Institute 
of International Medicine. University of Maryland 
School of Medicine, the Children's Hospital of the 
Fatima Jinnah Medical College, Lahore, and the Ea^t 
Medical Service, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. 

This study was supported in part by Research Grant 
Xo. 11327 entitled. International Center for Jledical 
Research and Training from the Office of International 
Research. National Institutes of Health of the United 
States Public Health Service. Department of Health. 
Education and Welfare. Supported in part bv a grant- 
in-aid from the Parke Davis Company, Detroit. 



that multiple drugs arc necessary for most 
cases of meningitis as advocated generally. 
Our regimen has consisted solely of 
chloramphenicol, in adequate doses, for 
treatment of most patients with pyogenic 
meningitis. The antibiotic exerts a wide 
range of antibacterial action and pene- 
trates readily into the cerebrum and 
meninges. (Woodward et al. 1958.) 
Many therapists agree that chlorampheni- 
col is a potent drug for treatment of 
meningitis and include it in recommended 
multi-antibiotic regimens. (Swartz et al. 
1965. Alexander et al. 1953, Smith et al. 
1953, Petersdorf et al.) Obviously, if one 
antibiotic cures effectively there is no need 
for exposure to additional drugs. Cure 
cannot be compounded. 

Our experience has developed slowly 
because of a relatively low incidence of 
meningitis on our service; the current 
trend to treat febrile patients with various 
antibiotics reduces the number of accept- 
able cases. This report describes the re- 
sults of chloramphenicol therapy in 
patients with meningitis caused by Diplo- 
cocciis pneumoniae, Neisseria intracel- 
liilaris. as well as a few miscellaneous and 
unclassified types. 

Methods of Stud.v 

Selection of Cases: Twenty-eight of 43 
patients in the chloramphenicol group 
were hospitalized at the University of 
Maryland. Baltimore, Maryland, the 



October, 1966 



43 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIJ-ERSIT)- OF MARYLAND 



Others at the Mayo, and Sir Ganga Ram 
Hospitals, Lahore, West Pakistan. 

CHnical manifestations typical of men- 
ingitis were present in each case and the 
diagnostic clinical and laboratory criteria 
previously described were maintained. 
(McCrumb el al. 1951.) 

For various reasons, beyond our con- 
trol, no attempt was made to alternate 
treatment using other antibiotics as con- 
trols. However, less severely ill patients 
encountered early in their disease were 
not selected for the chloramphenicol ser- 
ies. The cases reported reflect the total 
hospital experience for the periods speci- 
fied. A patient who had received an anti- 
biotic prior to hospitalization was in- 
cluded in the series only if the organism 
was identified in the blood, spinal fluid 
or skin lesion. In most instances, only 
chloramphenicol was given; other anti- 
biotic exceptions are described in the text. 

Therapeutic Regimen: The initial dose 
of chloramphenicol for adults was calcu- 
lated on the basis of 50 to 75 mgm. per 
kilo body weight and similar daily doses. 
Children received 75 to 100 mgm. per 
kilo as an initial and daily dose. Usually, 
chloramphenicol succinate was given 
intravenously initially in order to achieve 
a prompt high concentration of antibiotic 
in the blood and meninges. Capsules were 
given orally when possible and occas- 
ionally the powdered antibiotic from the 
capsule was suspended in saline and ad- 
ministered by gastric tube. The gastric 
tube was useful also for giving fluids and 
nutrients which reduced the need for 
intravenous alimentation. A few children 
were given Chloromycetin Palmitate by 
mouth. 

Penicillin regimens provided not less 
than 10 million units per day with com- 
parable doses for children. The intra- 
thecal route was not used. 



Therapeutic Results 

Summary of Results of 1954 Study 
(Parker et al. 1955). 

Data from our initial report are re- 
viewed briefly with the pertinent data 
presented in Table 11. 

One of 49 patients with meningoccocal 
infections treated solely with chloram- 
phenicol died of fulminant meningococ- 
cemia and meningitis. Autopsy showed 
bilateral confluent adrenal hemorrhages 
and culture of the blood, spinal fluid and 
adrenal tissues failed to yield N. intra- 
cellularis. Three deaths in 35 patients 
with Hemophilus influenzae meningitis 
were in infants aged less than one year 
in whom specific treatment was instituted 
on the 8th and 14th days. Three of 17 
fatal patients with meningitis due to Diplo- 
coccus pneumoniae were aged 2, 51 and 
65; they were treated initially on the 
fourth, second and fourth days of disease, 
respectively. This child died of over- 
whelming infection, one adult was an 
alcoholic with delirium tremens, and the 
oldest patient developed a superimposed 
hemolytic staphylococcal infection. 

Current Results 

Since the initial experience in 1954, 43 
patients with purulent meningitis have 
been treated with chloramphenicol alone. 
Of these, 13 had bacteriologically identi- 
fied meningococcal meningitis, 19 pneu- 
mococcal meningitis and one caused by 
staphylococci. There were 10 patients 
(5 in the Pakistan series) with purulent 
meningitis in whom no bacterial agent 
was isolated from the blood or spinal 
fluid; they are classified as undiagnosed. 
Pertinent clinical and laboratory data 
were given in Table I. 

N. intracellularis Meningitis 

As shown in Table 1, 13 patients with 
meningococcal meningitis were success- 



es/. .^2. No. 4 



HORXICK ET AL.—CHLORAMPHEXICOL TRF.ATMr.XT (>!■ M liX IXdl'l IS 



Table I. Therapeutic Results in 13 Patients with Purulent Meningitis 
Treated Solely with Chloramphenicol Baltimore and Pakistan 1959-65) 





Xo. 


Av. Day 

Disease 
Kx. 

Started 


Treat- 
ment 
Davs 

(Av.) 


Duration 

Fever 

after 

Rx. 


Diseases 


Compli- 
cations 
Xo. 


Deaths 


Bacterial Typi' 


No. 


Percent 


X. intracellularis 


13 


2.2 


10.0 


4.3 


1 


1 







D. pnemiioniae 


19 


2.7 


1-1 


5.0 


10 


6* 


1 




Hemolytic staphylococcus 


1 


2 


11 


3 


— 










I'nidentitied 


10 


2.2 


10 


4 


- 


3** 


2 




Totals 


43 












3 


7% 



* 2 relapsed; 2 cranial nerve involvement prior to therapy; 2 associated bacterial endocarditis 
** Cranial nerve involvement prior to therapy 



Table II. General Summary of Results in 154 Patients with Purulent Meningitis 
Treated Solely with Chloramphenicol (1950-54; 1959-65) 





1950-54 


- 


1959-65 


- 




TOTALS 




Bacterial Type 


No. 


Deaths 


% 


No. 


Deaths 


% 


No. 


Deaths 


% 


X. intracellularis 


49 


1 


2 


13 








62 


1 


2 


D. pneumoniae 


17 


3 


18 




19 


1** 


5 




36 


4 


11 


H. influenzae 


35 


3 


9 












35 


3 


9 


Miscellaneous + 


5 










1 










6 








Unidentified 


5 


1* 


20 




10 


2*** 


20 


- 


15 


3 


20 


Total 


HI 


8 


7 




43 


3 


7 


154 


11 


7 



-|- Includes one case each of Salmonella choleraesius, Listeria monocytogenes, hemolj'tic Staphylococ- 
cus, viridans Streptococcus, B hemolytic Streptococcus, and non-hemolytic Streptococcus. All 
recovered fully. 

* Expired within one hour of hospitalization. 

'* Expired within four hours of hospitalization. 

*** Expired within 24 and 35 hours of hospitalization. 



October. 1966 



45 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Table III. Summary of Results in 38 Patients with Meningitis 
Treated with Chloramphenicol and Other Antibiotics (Baltimore 1959-65) 





No. 


Mean Day 

of Disease 

Treatment 

Started 


Mean Dura- 
tion Chlo- 
ramphenicol 
Treatment 

(Days) 


Mean 
Duration 

Fever 
after Rx 

(Days) 


No. with 

Associated 

Diseases 


No. with 
Compli- 
cations 


Deaths 


Bacterial Type 


No. 


Percent 


D. pneumoniae 


13 


1.3 


12 


8.0 


11 


2 


3 


23% 


(No Chloramphenicol)* 


5 


1.8 


(14) 


3.7 


4 


1 


2 




E. coli 


4 


2.8 


6.0 


3.0 


3 





3 




Viridans Streptococcus 


1 


1 


22 


11 


1 


1 







H. influenzae 


7 


2.8 


16.4 


6.4 


3 


1 







Mixed infection** 


3 


1.3 


18 


5.5 


3 





1 




Unidentified 


5 


3.2 


11.2 


2.8 


4 


1 







Totals 


38 












9 


24% 



* Penicillin and other antibiotics except Chloramphenicol 
** 1 case Microaerophilic Streptococcus, Herella 
1 case Staphylococcus, Diphtheroids, S. Faecalis 
1 case Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas (Fatal Case) 



fully treated with chloramphenicol. They 
made a full recovery. These patients were 
treated on an average of 2.2 days after 
the onset of illness. Clinical response was 
prompt and the temperature reached 
normal levels within a little over four 
days after instituting treatment. One 
patient, a child, developed pyoarthritis 
of the knee which responded slowly to 
chloramphenicol and supplemental peni- 
cillin. The meningococcal infection abated 
promptly on chloramphenicol. 

H. influenzae Meningitis 

In the current series, no additional 
patients with H. infiuenzcic meningitis 
were treated with chloramphenicol ex- 
clusively; seven patients were given 
chloramphenicol plus other antibiotics, 
usually streptomycin and a sulfonamide 



drug. See Table III. All recovered fully; 
one developed a subdural collection of 
fluid and recovered after aspiration. 

D. pneumoniae Meningitis 

The current series included an ad- 
ditional 19 patients with pneumococcal 
meningitis treated solely with chloram- 
phenicol. See Tables I and II. These 
patients were treated on an average of 
the third day of disease and received 
treatment for about two weeks. Clinical 
response was prompt and the temperature 
reached normal levels on an average of 
five days after instituting treatment. 

Death occurred in one patient, aged 37, 
who was treated on the second day of ill- 
ness. This patient had an associated pneu- 
monia, uremia, and died within ten hours 
of hospitalization. One patient, a child. 



46 



r<./. ^L No. 4 



HORXICK FT AL.—CHLORAMPHEXICOL TREATME.XT OF MFS'l.XGITIS 



Table IV. Pertinent Clinical Data in 12 Fatal Cases of Pyogenic Meningitis 
Treated with Chlorainphenicol and Other Antibiotics 



Patient 


Age 


Bacterial 
Cause 


Presence 
of Coma 


Day 
Disease 

Rx 
Started 


Dav 
Death 


Initial 

CSP 

WIJC 

cu/mm 


Cause of Death 


Anti- 
biotic 
Rx 


P.E. 


55 


D. pneum. 


Stupor 


2 


3 


? 


Pyoarthrosis 
Bacteremia 
Rh. Arthritis 
Steroid Rx 


Tet. 
CHL. 


M..1. 


52 


D. pneum. 


Stupor 


3 


3 


3.0 


Died <U) hrs. Adni. 

Pneumonia 

Uremia 


Pen. 

CHL. 

Steroids 


E.li. 


37 


D. pneum. 


Yes 


2 


2 


2.8 


Died < 10 hrs. Hosp. 


CHL. 


T.H. 


28 


D. pneum. 


Yes 


1 


1 


3.2 


Alcoholism 
Recurrence 
Osteomyelitis cranium 


Pen. 


E.P. 


59 


D. pneum. 


• Yes 


1 


1 


25.0 


Died <■! hrs. 
Hosp. Recurrence 
Osteomyelitis cranium 


Pen. 


K.H. 


20 


D. pneum. 


Yes 


3 


3 


20.0 


Died <3 hrs. Hosp. 


Pen. 
CHL. 


.T.S. 


67 


E. coli 


Stupor 


3 


9 


15.0 


Skull Fracture 
Pneumonia 


CHL. 


CD. 


83 


E. coli 


Yes 


Late 


3 


.3 


Pneumonia 
Cerebral Infarction 


Pen. 

Sm. CHL. 


S.G. 


61 


E. coli 


Yes 


2 


3 


32.0 


Cirrhosis 
Diarrhea 


Sm. 


I.T. 


72 


Staphylo- 
coccus P. 
aeruginosa 


Stupor 


1 


24 


1.8 


Arteriosclerosis 
Mastoiditis 


Pen. Can. 
Sm. Van. 
CHL. 


CM. 


52 


Unidentified 


Stupor 


2 


3 


1.6 


Alcoholism 
Mastoiditis 
Osteomyelitis cranium 
Pneumonia 


CHL. 


X.T. 


61 


Unidentified 


Yes 


3 


4 


.3 


Alcoholism 
Carcinoma 
Pharyngeal .\bscess 


CHL. 



responded only partially to chlorampheni- 
col and was given penicillin in supple- 
mental meningeal doses. The causative 
pneumococcal strain was sensitive to 



chloramphenicol and to penicillin. This 
lack of complete response was unique in 
our experience. The palmitate form of 
Chloromycetin was given in the early 



October, 1966 



47 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICLXE. UNII'ERSrrV OF MARYLAND 



Stages of infection, supplemented by the 
intramuscular administration of Chloro- 
mycetin Succinate. Although we expect 
that adequate concentrations of chloram- 
phenicol were not achieved in the 
meninges and cerebrospinal fluid, the 
point is unproven since antibiotic assays 
were not performed in those patients 
treated in Pakistan because of technical 
limitations. 

Thirteen additional patients with pneu- 
mococcal meningitis were treated with 
chloramphenicol, penicillin and other 
antibiotics. See Table III. These patients 
were treated on an average during the 
second day of disease; treatment regimens 
in cured patients averaged 12 days. Eleven 
of these patients had associated illnesses, 
three died, and two developed compli- 
cations of their meningitis. 

Five additional patients were treated 
with penicillin and antibiotics other than 
chloramphenicol for about 14 days. Four 
of these patients had associated illnesses, 
two died and one developed a compli- 
cation of meningitis. Table IV shows that 
three of the fatal cases occurred in 4, 10, 
and 10 hours after hospitalization. In 
addition, these patients were either stupor- 
ous or in coma with disease involving 
other organ systems. Two of these fatal 
cases had experienced meningitis previ- 
ously. 

Miscellaneous Types of Meningitis 

A patient with hemolytic staphylococ- 
cal meningitis first treated on the second 
day of disease responded fully to chloram- 
phenicol. The clinical response was rapid 
and the temperature reached normal levels 
in about three days. See Table I. 

Three of four patients with E. coli 
meningitis died who were treated with 
chloramphenicol and other antibiotics. 
As shown in Tables III and IV, the three 



fatal patients had serious associated 
disease and were treated initially on about 
the third day of their illness when one 
patient was stuporous and two were in 
coma. Each of these bacterial strains 
were sensitive to the antibiotics ad- 
ministered when tested by the disc method. 

A patient with meningitis caused by 
Streptococcus viridans treated on about 
the third day of disease recovered after 
chloramphenicol and other antibiotic 
treatment. 

Mixed Bacterial Meningitis 

As shown in Tables III and IV, one of 
three patients with mixed bacterial menin- 
gitis treated with chloramphenicol and 
other antibiotics died. Each of these 
patients had serious associated diseases. 
A man, aged 72, with mastoiditis and 
severe cerebral vascular disease died. 
Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeru- 
ginosa were isolated from his purulent 
spinal fluid. 

Unclassified Types of Meningitis 

Ten patients whose meningitis was not 
specifically identified were treated solely 
with chloramphenicol. They were treated 
on an average of the second day of disease 
for approximately ten days. The dur- 
ation of fever after treatment was insti- 
tuted averaged four days. See Tables I 
and II. Two of these patients died 
(20%). Each of these fatal cases had 
serious associated diseases as shown in 
Tables I and IV; one was stuporous on 
hospitalization and one was in coma. 

Five additional patients whose meningi- 
tis was not identified bacteriologically re- 
covered following treatment with chloram- 
phenicol and other antibiotics. See Table 
III. The average day that treatment was 
instituted was 3.2 and defervescence oc- 
curred in 2.8 days. 



To/. 51. No 4 



HOKXICK /■■/■ .H.—ClllJiRAMrilliXICOI. TRI-.ATM l-XT Ol- MI-IXIXCITIS 



Discussion and Summary 

Fatality rates in meningococcal menin- 
gitis using either sulfonamides or penicillin 
are low, not exceeding 59f. (Dingle ci 
al. 1941 and Daniels ('/ «/. 1950). Acute 
t'ulminant meningococcal infections ac- 
count for therapeutic failure in most 
instances. Strains of A', intnicclliilaiis re- 
sistant to sulfadiazine occasionally occur 
(Miller ct al. 1963) and physicians must 
be aware of this possibility. Mortality in 
patients with pneumococcal meningitis 
treated with penicillin varies from 20% to 
30% (Swartz et al. 1965 and Lepper 
ci al. 1951). Recovery of at least 90% 
of infants and children with H. influenzae 
meningitis is expected. (Swartz et al. 
1965 and Smith et al. 1950). 

Our experience with chloramphenicol 
in these three types of bacterial meningitis 
compares well; fatality rates from men- 
ingococcal, pneumococcal and H. influ- 
enzae meningitis were 1.5% in 62 
patients, 11% in 36 patients, and 8.5% 
in 35 patients, respectively. See Table II. 
Recovery in patients with meningitis 
caused by the three major bacterial agents 
treated by conventional therapeutic regi- 
mens is relatively slow (Swartz et al. 
1965). Clinical improvement manifested 
by increased responsiveness occurs on an 
average of about two, three and three days 
in meningococcic, pneumococcic and H. 
influenzae meningitis, whereas the tem- 
perature returns to normal levels in about 
three, four and four days respectively. 
(Swartz et al. 1965). 

Chloramphenicol-treated patients re- 
sponded equally well and temperatures 
abated in four, five and three days in 
meningococcic, pneumococcic and H. in- 
fluenzae meningitis, respectively. The 
incidence of initial stupor and coma was 
comparable to that reported in other 
series. These results compare favorably 
with any other series and there is no ques- 



tion regarding the specific curative agent 
since no ollwr drui^.s' were used. Usually, 
complications of meningitis involving the 
cranial nerves or joints were manifest at 
the time of initiating specific treatment. 

One patient, a child aged one year, 
with confirmed pneumococcic meningitis, 
failed to respond satisfactorily to chloram- 
phenicol treatment. Continuing fever and 
a positive spinal fluid culture after 12 days 
forced the supplemental administration 
of penicillin. Full recovery ensued. This 
experience was unique in this series, and 
is presumed to have resulted from inade- 
quate dosage. Deaths in meningitis are a 
sequel to overwhelming infection and to 
the excessive, often irreparable, damage 
prior to the time of instituting adequate an- 
tibiotic treatment. In some patients, par- 
ticularly the aged, there are serious under- 
lying and associated illnesses which de- 
termine outcome. The meningitis is 
another burden rather than the primary 
difficulty. 

Fatality in meningitis caused by several 
bacterial species simultaneously is high. 
In the current series, one of three such 
patients died. All had received multiple 
antibiotics. In one reported series, 20 of 
534 patients had meningitis caused by 
two or more bacterial types (Herweg et 
al. 1963) involving H. influenzae, N. in- 
Iracellularis, D. pneumoniae, staphylococ- 
ci, streptococci, and gram negative bacter- 
ia. The over-all fatality rate was 35%. In 
another study of nine cases with mixed 
meningitis (Carpenter et al. 1962) all 
died. Several antibiotics are required for 
treatment of patients with meningitis 
caused by gram negative bacteria such as 
Klebsiella, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pro- 
teus bacilli. E. coli, Salmonellae, and less 
common types which are serious and carry 
high fatality rates. (Swartz et al. 1965.) 
Chloramphenicol is effective for many of 
these types of infection. 



October, 1966 



49 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. UNILERSLTV OF .VAIO'LAXD 



Excluding tuberculosis and the viral 
meningoencephalitides, meningococci and 
pneumoncocci in adults, and these path- 
ogens plus H. influenzae in children, ac- 
count for about 70% of all cases of 
meningitis. (Swartz et al. 1965.) Thus, 
chloramphenicol is effective in over two- 
thirds of the common bacterial causes of 
meningitis. Like all drugs, it fails when 
outdistanced by the irreversible tissue 
damage of bacteria. Prompt effective 
treatment is mandatory and there is al- 
ways need for accurate bacteriologic con- 
firmation in meningitis through proper 
direct examination and culture of the 
spinal fluid. Ideally, each patient should 
be appraised individually when all diag- 
nostic facilities are available. Under less 
ideal circumstances, sound guidelines may 
be derived from studying a properly 
stained spinal fluid sediment. Prompt ad- 
ministration of adequate doses of anti- 
biotic will save lives. Even under ideal 
circumstances, the specific diagnosis is 
occasionally not made. Chloramphenicol 
is useful under these obscure circum- 
stances as well as in those specific situa- 
tions outlined. It is a major therapeutic 
agent for purulent meningitis and may 
be the sole drug needed in many types. 

Similar findings using ampicillin as the 
sole antibiotic have been reported by 
Mathies et al. This group treated 192 
patients with pyogenic meningitis with 
results similar to those reported here. 

Our data are inadequate to confirm 
that fatality rates are higher in pneumo- 
coccal meningitis when penicillin and 
chloramphenicol are combined (Swartz 
et al. 1965) in contrast to the results with 
penicillin alone. As shown in Table III. 
3 of 13 patients died who were treated 
with penicillin and chloramphenicol 
(23% ). This latter rate with two or more 
chemotherapeutic agents is in excess to 
the 1 1 % associated with chloramphenicol 



as the sole antibiotic (Table II). In the 
group of 20 patients with purulent menin- 
gitis, other than pneumococcal types, 
which were treated with penicillin, 
chloramphenicol and other drugs in some 
instances, there were 4 deaths or 20%. 
See Table III. Three of 21 patients with 
miscellaneous or unclassified forms died, 
(14%) who were treated solely with 
chloramphenicol (data from Table II). 
Although the trend appears to be signifi- 
cant the data may be misleading because 
patients were not treated on an alternate 
basis. The objective was not to compare 
the results of single vs. multiple drug 
regimens. 

The pertinent question is whether one 
antibiotic suffices in lieu of combinations. 
Is there valid evidence for employing 
multiple antibacterial drugs in purulent 
meningitis? There are no reliable con- 
firmatory data. In sophisticated medical 
settings specific confirmation of meningitis 
is made in approximately 90% of cases 
(Swartz ('/ al. 1965). Specific diagnosis 
was made in 83% of 180 cases in the 
Baltimore series, in Lahore 5 of 16 
patients were not identified bacteri- 
ologically. Prompt and maximal treat- 
ment produces excellent results. Many 
patients contract meningitis in poor socio- 
economic settings without the advantage 
of such refinements, albeit necessary. 
Under these conditions, multiple drug 
therapy is awkward as well as expensive. 
If a single antibiotic is effective for the 
majority of cases of pyogenic meningitis, 
therapy is thereby simplified and more 
economical. Chloramphenicol is reliable 
in its effectiveness and compares favor- 
ably with multiple drug regimens. 

Chloramphenicol is not a panacea nor 
has it solved the serious therapeutic prob- 
lem of purulent meningitis. It is effective 
as the sole drug in the three major forms 
of bacterial meningitis and is therapeu- 



50 



/lORXICK P.r AL.—CIII.OKAMrilESICOI. TKF.ATM F.XT OF MFMXiAIIS 



tically useful in gram negative infections 
caused by Salmoneilae, E. coli, P. cierioji- 
iiosa Klebsiellac, and Proteus bacilli. 
(Swartz el cil. 1965.) Several drugs arc 
often required for treatment of these latter 
types yet chloramphenicol merits inclu- 
sion in such regimens. 

Chloramphenicol, in rare instances, 
elicits serious hematologic reactions, such 
as aplastic anemia, thrombocytopenia and 
pancytopenia. (Rosenbach et al. 1960 
and McCurdy ct al. 1961.) We have not 
observed a fatal or irreversible reaction in 
more than 2,500 patients to whom we 
have given chloramphenicol for various 
acute infectious illnesses. It is our prac- 
tice to use chloramphenicol, and all other 
antibiotics for that matter, only for spe- 
cifically diagnosed acute infections and 
for relatively short periods. The risk of 
chloramphenicol is rare but real; neither 
can the threat of adverse reactions from 
other anti-bacterial drugs be ignored. 
(Hirsh et al. 1958 and Dowling et al. 
1964.) Few, if any, drugs lack toxic pro- 
perties. Delay in instituting maximal 
effective treatment to patients with puru- 
lent meningitis is far more dangerous and 
exceeds the threat of a transient or rare 
irreversible toxic reaction. No adverse 
antibiotic reactions were observed in the 
series. 

Conclusions 

Chloramphenicol effectively cures pa- 
tients with menigococcal and pneumococ- 
cal meningitis when given as the sole anti- 
microbial drug sufficiently early in the 
course of infection. All 13 patients with 
meningococcal meningitis recovered. One 
of 19 patients with meningitis caused by 
D. penumoniae died. 

Our total experience with chloram- 
phenicol in treating 154 patients with 
purulent meningitis is: N. intracellularis 
62 patients, one death (1.5%); D. pneu- 
moniae 36 patients, 4 deaths (\\%); H. 



influenzae 35 patients, 3 deaths (8.5%); 
unclassified, 15 patients. 3 deaths (20%) 
and miscellaneous types, 6 patients, no 
deaths. This represents an overall 
fatality rate of 7% in 154 patients. 

Therapeutic failure in purulent menin- 
gitis appears to be dependent upon delay 
in instituting treatment before irreversible 
tissue changes have occurred. Our data 
suggests that a combination of chloram- 
phenicol with penicillin in pneumococcal 
meningitis is less effective than when 
either drug is used alone. The point is 
not proven. 

In the current study no significant re- 
sistance to chloramphenicol was observed 
in the micro-organisms encountered. The 
practical implications pertaining to the 
use of a single antibiotic in purulent 
meningitis are discussed. 

Acknowledgement 

Grateful appreciation is expressed to House 
Officers of the Baltimore and Lahore Hospitals 
for their assistance in treating the patients re- 
ported. Dr. Merrill J. Snyder, Miss Audrey Funk 
and Dr. Z. Hussain rendered technical assistance 
without which the study would not have been 
possible. Thanks are expressed to the Chiefs 
of Service of the Maryland General Hospital, 
Baltimore, the Lahore General Hospital and 
the Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, West Pakis- 
tan, for treating several patients according to 
the therapeutic plan. Dr. Nijole and Dr. A. C. 
Alevizatos graciously assisted in compiling 
factual data from the hospital records. 

References 

1. Parker, R. T.; Snvder, M. J.; Liu, S. J.; 
LooPER, J. W., Jr., and Woodward, T. E.: 
Therapeutic range of chloramphenicol in puru- 
lent meningitis. Aitlibiotic Medicine, l:\92, 
1955. 

2. Swartz, M. N. and Dodge, P. R.: Bac- 
terial meningitis. A review of selected aspects. 
New England J. Med.. 272:725, 1965. 

3. Dingle, J. H.; Thomas, L., and Morton, 
A. R.: Treatment of meningococcic meningitis 
and meningococcemia with sulfadiazine. 
J. A.M. A., IJ 6:2666, 1941. 

4. Lepper, M. H.: Meningococcic meningitis 
treatment with large doses of penicillin com- 



Octohcr, 106a 



51 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. LWIl-ERSITY OF MARVLAXD 



pared to treatment with gantrisin. J. Lab and 
Clin. Med., 40:S9\, 1952. 

5. Lepper. M. H. and Dowling. H. F.: 
Treatment of pneumococcic meningitis with 
penicillin compared with penicillin plus 
aureomycin. Studies including observations on 
apparent antagonism between penicillin and 
aureomycin. A.M. A. Arch. Int. Med., SS;439, 
1951. 

6. ScHOENBACH. E. B.; Spencer. H. C, and 
MONNIER. J.: Treatment of H. influenzae 
meningitis with aureomycin and chlorampheni- 
col. Experience in 30 consecutive cases. Ant. 
J. Med.. 12:265, 1952. 

7. McCrumb. F. R.; Hall, H. E.; Imburg, 
J.: Merideth. a. M.: Helmhold. R.: Defillo. 
J. B.. and Woodward. T. E.: Treatment of 
Hemophilus influenzae meningitis with chloram- 
phenicol and other antibiotics. J.A.M.A., 
145:169. 1951. 

8. Woodward. T. E. and WISSE^L\N, C. L.. 
Jr.: Chloromycetin (chloramphenicol). Anti- 
biotics Monograph No. 8. Medical Encvclo- 
pedia, Inc.. New York, 1958, pp. 24-32. 

9. Alexander, H. E.: Guides to optimal 
therapy in bacterial meningitis. J. A.M. A., 
152:662. 1953. 

10. Smith. M. H. D. and Herring, G. W : 
The treatment of acute bacterial meningitis 
in infants and children. Posmraduate Medicine 
14: 540. 1953. 

11. Petersdorf. R. G.: Other bacterial 
menineitides. Cecil-Loeb Te.xtbook of Medi- 
cine. XI Edition, pp. 211-212, W. B. Saunders 
Company. Philadelphia. 1963. 

12. McCrumb. F. R.: Hall, H. E.; 
Merideth, A. M.; Deane, G. E.; Minor, J. \'., 



and Woodward, T. E. : Chloramphenicol in the 
treatment of meningococcal meningitis. Am. 
J. Med.. 10:696. 1951. 

13. Daniels. W. B.: Cause of death in 
meningococcic infection: Analysis of 300 cases. 
Am. J. Med..S:46S. 1950. 

14. Millar, J. W.; Siess, E. E.: Feldman, 
H. A.: Silverman, C: Frank, P.: In vivo and 
vitro resistance to sulfadiazine in strains of 
neisseria meningitidis. J.A.M.A., 7S6.139, 1963. 

15. Smith, M. H. D.: Chloramphenicol in 
treatment of Hemophilus influenzal meningitis. 
I.A.M.A.. 143:1405. 1950. 

16. Herweg, J. C: Middlekamp. J. N., and 
Hartman, A. F. : Simultaneous mi.xed bacterial 
meningitis in children. J. Pediat, 63:76-9'}, 
1963. 

17. Carpenter, R. and Petersdorf. R. G.: 
Clinical spectrum of bacterial meningitis. Am. 
J. .Med.. 33:261-215, 1962. 

18. RosENB.\CH. L. M.; Gaviles, A. P.; 
Mitus, W. J.: Chloramphenicol Toxicity. Re- 
versible vacuolization of erythroid cells. New 
England J. Med.. 263:724. 1960. 

19. McCuRDV. P. R. : Chloramphenicol bone 
marrow toxicity. J.A.M.A.. i76.-588. 1961. 

20. Hirsh, H. L. and Putman. L. E.: Peni- 
cillin. Antibiotics Monograph No. 9. Medical 
Encyclopedia. Inc.. New York, 1958, pp. 18-22. 

21. Dowling, H. F. and Lepper, M. H.: 
Hepatic reactions to tetracycline. J. A.M. A., 
188:235. 1964. 

22. Mathies, Jr.. A. W.: Leedom, I. M.; 
Thrupp. L. D.; Ivler, D.: Portnoy. B.: and 
Wehrle. p. F.: Experience with ampicillin in 
bacterial meningitis. Antimicrobial Aaents and 
Chemotherapy— 1965. pp. 610-617. 



52 



Vol. 51, No. 4 



Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis 

Reporl of a Case* 

SAMUEL S. CLICK, A.B., M.D., F.A.A.P. and EUGENE S. BERESTON, M.D., Sc. (Med.), F.A.C.P. 



Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis was 
first described by Lyell*'^ of Scotland 
in 1956. He reported a case which re- 
sembled a scalding of the skin, but in 
whom the lesions were limited entirely to 
the epidermis without any systemic symp- 
toms of shock. He coined the term "toxic 
epidermal necrolysis." It has also been 
referred to as the "scalded skin syn- 
drome." In most individuals with this 
condition there is a prodrome of lethargy, 
malaise, fever, and then an erythematous 
skin eruption followed by the appearance 
of bullae. Nikolsky's sign was usually 
positive. 

Report of a Case 

A 37 months old Negro male, an only 
child, was admitted to University Hospital 
on February 23, 1965, with a complaint of 
skin eruption and fever. The patient had ap- 
peared well until 24 hours prior to admission, 
when the mother noted a diffuse eruption with 
fever and desquamation of skin around the 
ears. The epidermis was found almost im- 
mediately to "slide off in sheets." This child 
had a past history of inability to talk and could 
not chew solid foods. The child was the pro- 
duct of a 40-week gestation, with a birthweight 
of 5 lbs. 8V2 ounces. Until the time of his 
admission, he had refused solid foods and was 
given daily Multivitamins and pureed foods 
only. 

The parents were both living and in good 
health. The family history was negative. 

Physical Examination. This well developed, 
well nourished child was in no acute distress. 
Pulse was 90 and regular, respiration 25, tem- 



From the Department of Pediatrics and the Di- 
ion of Dermatology. Department of Medicine, Uni- 
sity of Maryland, School of Medicine. 



perature 102°. Conjunctivae, ears and throat 
were not injected. A whitish membrane was 
present on both tonsils. There was no signifi- 
cant cervical adenopathy. The lungs were clear 
to percussion and auscultation. The heart rhy- 
thm was regular and no murmurs were heard. 
Abdomen: On palpation, no organomegaly or 
masses were noted. The skin showed a gen- 
eralized fine scaling macular eruption. 

Nikolsky's sign could be obtained with slight 
pressure on any part of the skin surface. 
Exfoliation occurred in sheetlike fashion pro- 
ducing a "scalded" appearance. (See Fig. 1.) 

Laho ralom Data : 

Blood sugar 78 HemoElobin 13.2 Gm. % 

Blood Urea NitroEen 9 

ms. ^'r Hematocrit 37 

Combining power 26 WBC 10.500 

Chlorides 103 M.Eq.L. Polymorphonuclear Neu- 

trophils filamented 49% 
Blood Sodium 141 

M.Eq.L. 
Blood Potassium 4.9, 

M.Eq. L. Monocvtes 12% 

Serum Albumin 4.3 Gm. % Eosinophils 4% 
Serum Globulin 2.7 Gm. % Basophils 5% 
Sickle cell preparation — 

negative Platelets 816.000 

Urinalysis — negative 

The following day, blood hematocrit was 
36 and sedimentation rate was 15.3. A throat 
culture had moderate growths of hemolytic 
staph, coagulase positive: light growth of N. 
catarrhalis. and also light growth of hemo- 
philus influenza. The hemolytic staphylococci, 
coagulase positive, was resistant to penicillin 
and Vancomycin. 

Repeat urinalysis was again negative. Chest 
X-ray was normal. A skin biopsy was obtained 
with difficulty. 

Biopsy Report: Maceration of the upper der- 
mis. Slight thickening of the rete with exocy- 
tosis and mildly infiltrated. Section not diag- 
nostic. (See Fig. 2) (Courtesy Dr. L. Harmon). 

Clinical Course: The child was given Methi- 
cillin,® 100 mg. intramuscularly, every 8 hours 
for 8 days. A persistent low-grade fever was 



October, 1966 



53 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNirERSITY OF MARYLAND 




present during the hospital admission. By the 
time of discharge, all skin lesions were healed 
and the throat was clear. 

On the day after discharge, the child became 
febrile and anoretic. He was very irritable 
and was readmitted to the hospital at 8:25 
A.M., with a temperature of 103. 2°F (rectal). 
He was in acute distress, with a pulse rate of 
140, respiration 28 per minute. At this time, 
he had nasal congestion and mucous discharge 
and congestion of the tonsils with an exudate 
on the right tonsil. A grade I soft systolic mur- 
mur was heard over the precordium. but no 
radiation was noted with change of position. 
Healed lesions resulting from the previous 
episode of toxic necrolysis were present on 
the arms, legs, anterior and posterior trunk. No 
pustules were seen. Nikolsky's sign at this time 
was negative. 




'- 'Jr^. 



Laboratory Findings on Second Admission: 
neg- 



Hemoelobin 12.2 Gm. 

per cent 
Hematocrit 36.5 
Blood Leucocytes 14,400 



Throat culture on March 12, 1965 had hem- 
olytic staphlycocci, coagulase positive and a 
moderate growth of alpha streptococci. 

Antistreptolysin titre on March 16, 1965 
was less than 55 todd units. 

VRDL (Venereal Disease Reagen Level) 
negative. 

On March 24, 1965 Blood hemoglobin was 
12.5 mg. per cu. mm. 

On March 24, 1965 Blood hematocrit was 38. 

A collagen disease was suspected and fol- 
lowing tests to rule this out were done: 

Sedimentation rate 13 

Lupus Erythematosus Prep negative 

Blood Leucocytes 8,600 

Antistreptolysin less than 50 

C-Reactive Protein negative 

Physical Examination: On March 15, 1965, 
chest X-ray showed no evidence of pulmonary 
disease. The heart was full size. Electrocardio- 
gram showed sinus rhythm with a questionable 
first degree atrioventricular block. The PR in- 
terval was .16 seconds. The rate was 100 per 
minute. The only significant finding in the 
clinical course was a change in the cardiac 
murmur. On March 19, 1965 a grade II (on 
a scale of IV) systolic murmur was best heard 
at the apex and did not radiate. There was no 
thrill. A friction rub was not noted. At this 



54 



Vol. 51. No. 4 



CLICK 



HEh'/isrox— TOXIC r.i'ini-.KM.ii. xhckod'sis 



lime Ihc pulse rate was 90 and temperature was 
98 (rectal). There was epidermal desquamation 
of the fingers without erythema. However, 
the cardiac findings did not point to rheimiatic 
fever. 

Cliniial Course: On this second admission 
the patient was given Unipen'' 125 mg. intra- 
muscularly every 12 hours. On March 15. 1965 
Chloromycetin.® 125 mgs. every four hours 
was added to the regimen. On March 17. 1985 
Unipen'i and ChloromycetinB were discontin- 
ued. Oxytetraclycine drops. 250 mg. were im- 
mediately given, and 250 mg. of the same 
continued every six hours thereafter and then 
followed by a reduction. On March 19. 1965 
Oxytetraclycline drops were discontinued. The 
patient was discharged on March 27. 1965. 

Discussion 

Lyell'" was the first to describe and 
to name this disease. Since then, cases oc- 
ciiring in all races have been reported 
from all over the world. According to 
Overton'-' more cases have been re- 
ported in Africans. The disease may oc- 
cur at any age. The oldest patient was 
85 years old according to Beare'^' and 
the youngest 2 weeks old, as reported by 
Walker.*" The condition begins with 
malaise, lethargy, and erythema, and 
sometimes with a mild sore throat, or 
mucous membrane irritation. The sore 
throat and mucous membrane soreness 
may antedate the appearance of the skin 
lesions by as much as 1 to 2 weeks. Some- 
times there may be vomiting or diarrhea. 
Fever usually begins within 1 to 2 days 
before the onset of the skin lesions. From 
the time the skin becomes involved, the 
disease advances very rapidly. Fever may 
be very high with increased pulse rate, 
prostration, irritability, and discomfort. 
Within 12 hours large flaccid bullae form 
on various parts of the body, from head 
to foot. The lesions may also appear in 
mucous membranes of the mouth and 
upper respiratory tract including the eye- 
lids. Nikolsky's sign is usually positive 
and the skin may be rubbed ofi" like 



steamed wallpaper. As the epidermis 
peels off, raw, oozing, red, and tender 
dermal areas appear. Leukocytosis with 
a shift to the left is generally present. On 
occasions marked leukopenia has been 
reported. This is particularly true, where 
the etiology is attributed to a drug 
reaction. 

When the acute process begins to sub- 
side, healing takes place. The time from 
the onset of the bullae to the healing stage 
generally takes 10 days to 2 weeks. In 
most cases scarring does not take place, 
unless a secondary pyoderma supervenes. 
Recurrences usually do not occur, al- 
though Lyell describes one patient who 
had 6 recurrent episodes. In our patient, 
the readmission episode with a high fever 
occurred but there were no skin lesions on 
the re-admission. 

The condition has a mortality rate of 
30%. Death usually occurs in the first 
week. 

Pathology 

The histopathology is described in the 
literature as similar to a second degree 
burn, with marked vesication in the der- 
mal epidermal junction. There is a necro- 
tic epidermis, and the dermis itself is us- 
ually normal. Our biopsy was not too 
satisfactory due to poor cooperation from 
the child. 

Etiology 

Much has been theorized in the liter- 
ature about the cause of this disease. 
Some authors state that it represents a 
form of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, or 
an idiosyncrasy, a modified Sanarelli- 
Shwartzman phenomenon, or acute pem- 
phigus. <5"'> The African cases have 
led to a theory that the ingestion of 
Snoek, a fish with high Vitamin A con- 
tent in its liver, may be the cause of this 
condition.' -■" ' 

The majority of authors suggest that 
toxic epidermal necrolysis is a hyper- 



Octobcr, 1960 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. UXU'ERSITY OF MARYLAND 



sensitivity state, and that the trigger me- 
chanism may be food, drug, or a bacterial 
metabolite, in which an antibody reac- 
tion is produced. 

Among the drugs administered to pa- 
tients who subsequently developed toxic 
epidermal necrolysis are tetracycline, 
neomycin,® penicillin, oil of chenopo- 
dium, phenylbutazone, phenolphthalein, 
gold salts, barbiturates, antipyrine, ace- 
tazaolamide, opium preparations, sulfona- 
mides, dapsone, antihistamines, polio vac- 
cine, diphtheria inoculation, and tetanus 
antitoxin. In about 20% of patients there 
is no drug history at all. The most com- 
mon drugs are sulfonamides, penicillin, 
phenylbutazone, phenolphthalein, and an- 
tipyrine.'''-i-''-'-i-'-'5'i'5.i7.i8) 

There was no history of drug ingestion 
in this patient. Cutaneous reactions to 
drugs are well known. However, it is ap- 
parent that in a number of cases of toxic 
epidermal necrolysis reported in the liter- 
ature, as well as in our case, no history of 
drug therapy (no drug history) could be 
obtained. In some of the case studies, up- 
per respiratory tract infection was evi- 
dent."" In our case, there appeared to be 
a purulent exudative tonsillitis with a num- 
ber of organisms isolated. 

In the differential diagnosis of this dis- 
ease, Ritter's Disease, otherwise known 
as Dermatitis Exfoliativa Neonatorum, 
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, acute bullous 
pemphigus, or Bullous pemphigoid, would 
have to be considered. 

Treatment 

The treatment of this condition is en- 
tirely symptomatic. In severe cases, ste- 
roids in large dosage prior to epidermal 
necrolysis itself may be lifesaving and 
seem to decrease the severity of the re- 
action. Rowel! and Thompson'" have 
reported deaths even where larger dosages 
of steroids were given, whereas Mandel- 



baum and Kane"-' have reported sur- 
vivals of patients without the use of ste- 
roids. The patient in this report received 
no steroids. He was treated with anti- 
biotics, because the only evident basis 
for the condition was an upper respira- 
tory tract infection. Loss of fluids through 
large wide areas of denudation necessi- 
tated intravenous replacement. 

Conclusions 

A case of toxic epidermal necrolysis 
occurring in a three year old male is re- 
ported. The condition was apparently 
associated with an upper respiratory tract 
infection involving the tonsils. 

The child responded to antibiotic 
therapy. 

Bibliography 

1. Lyell. a.. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis 
(Eruption Resembling Scalding of the Skin), 
Brilisli Journal of Dermatology, 1956, pp. 
68-355. 

2. Overton. J., Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis 
Associated with Phenylbutazone Therapy, 
British Journal of Dermatology. 1962, pp. 74- 
100. 

3. Walker, J.. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, 
Med. Proc. 1962, p. 208. 

4. Beare, M., Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, 
Arch, of Derm.. 86:638, 1962. 

5. RowELL, N. R. and Thompson, H., Toxic 
Epidermal Necrolysis in Patient with Pulmo- 
nary Aspergillosis. British Journal of Dermatol- 
ogy, 1961, 73:278. 

6. Frain-Bellu and Koblenzer, T., Toxic 
Epidermal Necrolysis (Scalded Skin Syndrome), 
Join-nal of Pediatrics. 1961, 58:722. 

7. Catto, Julian F., Toxic Epidermal Nec- 
rolysis Occurring In Child. British Med. Jour- 
nal. 1959, 2:544. 

8. Lang, R. and Walker J., Toxic Epider- 
mal Necrolysis — Report of Four Cases, Soi4th 
African Med. Joimial. 1957. 31:713. 

9. Jarkowski. T. L. and Mantmer E. E., 
Fatal Reaction to Sulfadimethoxine (Madri- 
bon). Case showing Toxic Epidermal Necro- 
l>sis and Leukopenia. American Journal of 
Diseases of Children. 1962, 104:669. 



56 



Vol, 51, No, 4 



(il.lL K 



lU-HESTOX—l iiXU I-I'IDERMAL SFXHOI.YSIS 



10. Bush. R., Park, R. and Weston, J.. 
To.xic Epidermal Necrolysis — Report of Four 
Cases, New Zealand Med. Journal, 196.^. 
62:95-97. 

11. Langmar and Walkir J.. Uniisiial Bul- 
lous Eruption. South African Medical Joarnal. 
1965, 30:97. 

12. MandklbaL'm, H. and Kane;, L. J., 
Dilantin Sodium Poisoning, Report of Case 
with Dermatitis E.xfoliative Pyrexia and Hep- 
atic and Splenic Enlargement, Archives of Neu- 
rology and Psychiatry, 1941, 45:769. 

13. E\ ANS, C, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis. 
British Med. Journal. 1959. 2:i>27. 



14. Rusk. D. 



Fulminatins Dermatitis 



Bullosa Medicame.Ttojti due to Mesantoin, 
JAM A. 1948, 137:1031. 

15. Browni, S. G. and Riik.i . Toxic Epi- 
dermal Necrolysis. liritisli Med. Joiiriuil, 19.S1, 
1:550. 

16. Jai;glr, H., Eruption Mortellc Due aux 
Scls d'or Erythcmato-Bullcusc Pcmphigoide. 
.March Rapide, Derinaiolotiica, 1951, 103:280. 

17. Ki£NNEDY, C. B., et al, Dermatitis Medi- 
camentosa Due to Antipyrine Study, of 28 
Cases in Negroes, Following Use of Proprie- 
tory Medication (666 cold preparation). 
Archives of Dermatology. 1957, 75:826. 

18. Bailv C, Rosenbaum, Jr., Andi;rson, 
R.. Epidermal Necrolysis, JAMA, 1956, 
191:979. 



October, 1966 



57 



^ook 3^ebicto£i 




Basic Gastro-Enterology. By J. M. Naish, 
and A. E. Read, 335 pp. 1965. John 

Wright & Sons Ltd., Bristol. 

In obtaining a medical education one is 
forced to decide how to spend his reading 
time most effectively. During the years 
in medical school it is especially important 
that these hours be spent efficiently accumu- 
lating information. 

This concise text on gastro-enterology 
provides the student with just such an oppor- 
tunity to acquaint himself with the broad 
scope of the subject in a relatively limited 
time. 

This book deals with the subject in its en- 
tirety. As with most British tests it describes 
excellently the clinical picture: mention is 
also made of etiological possibilities, patho- 
physiological states, diagnostic techniques, 
and therapeutic possibilities. 

It also possesses a good table of contents 
and is well indexed; and for those who 
choose additional reading, brief but ex- 
cellent bibliographies are included. 

It is a brief, descriptive work and should 
be regarded as such; it therefore would pro- 
vide the greatest amount of information to 
those individuals seeking to become initially 
acquainted with the subject matter. 

J. W. ECKHOI-DT, M.D. 

Gonadotropins: Physiochemical and Immuno- 
logic Properties. Ed. by G. E. W. 

Wollenstenholm and Julie Knight, 125 
pp. 1965. Little, Brown and Company, 
Boston, Mass. $3.50 

This is the published report of the de- 
liberations of the Ciba Foundation, Group 
:^ 22, which convened on February 5, 1965. 




The study group consisted of a representa- 
tive number of distinguished investigators 
in gonadotropin research. The specified pur- 
pose of the study group was to discuss the 
several aspects of gonadotropic substances. 

The historical introduction by Christian 
Hamberger was especially interesting and 
reflects his great knowledge and familiarity 
with the field of gonadotropin research. 
Each chapter of the symposium consists of 
discussion of the specific physiochemical 
and immunologic properties of the several 
better known gonadotropins. Each presen- 
tation was followed by group discussion. 

Our current knowledge concerning the 
isolation, preparation, activity, and im- 
munoassay of gonadotropins is well sum- 
marized. The volume has additional value 
in that many of the still unresolved prob- 
lems in gonadotropin research are indicated. 

Arthur L. Haskins, M.D. 

Controversy in Internal Medicine. Ed. by 
Franz J. Ingelfinger, M.D., Arnold S. 
Relman, M.D., and Maxwell Finland. 
M.D., 679 pp. 1966. W. B. Saunders 
Co., Philadelphia. $14.50 

The majority of present publications in 
the field of medicine deal with the descrip- 
tion and treatment of disease processes. 
The validity of this is unquestioned but it 
places a burden of responsibility upon the 
physician who must synthesize this infor- 
mation into usable knowledge as he attempts 
to deal with the practical problems of diag- 
nosis and treatment. In addition this added 
knowledge is superimposed upon a founda- 
tion acquired during his years of training. 

This book deals with controversies in 
internal medicine: its purpose is not icono- 



58 



I'ol. .^1. Xo. 4 



lUHiK Runiiirs 



chistic but rather to locus upon the various 
debated issues in medicine. The format 
of the book is such that expert opinions on 
a particular subject are contrasted and an 
editorial comment is inserted at the end 
of each chapter. The topics, numbering 2.^. 
vary from "Atherscierosis and diet" to "Who 
needs drugs for hypertension?" 

Particularly interesting are the comments 
of Goldring and Chasis on antihypertensive 
therapy. Their skepticism is based upon 
the paucity of adequately controlled studies 
in this area. Page. Dustan. and Hollander 
cite man)' of the same studies, grant their 
partial invalidity, and argue to the con- 
trary. This is particularly helpful as one 
must draw his own conclusions regarding 
such issues. 

The question of the pathogenicity of anti- 
bodies and the general topic of autoim- 
munity is dealt with by two competent 
in\estigators: Mackay and Waksman. 
Mackay's arguments are straightforward 
and well documented as he affirms the role 
of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of 
disease. Waksman. in a rational discussion, 
finds that the evidence is less convincing and 
tends to see the immune response as a 
secondary reaction to tissue damage. Jandl 
in his comments summarizes both views and 
brings forth additional evidence to impli- 
cate the antigen-antibody reaction and its 
pathogenicity. 

Regarding the problem of chronic glo- 
merulonephritis both Rammelkamp and 
Earle agree that it may follow post-strepto- 
coccal acute glomerulonephritis. Rammel- 
kamp feels that the incidence is quite low 
but he is willing to allow its occurrence. 
Earle, a well-known researcher in this area, 
expresses the need for the more clearly de- 
fined usage of the term "chronic glomerulo- 
nephritis," and his plea is appreciated by 
Relman as he comments on both discussions. 

The book is unique inasmuch as it pre- 
sents controversy. As opinions of the vari- 
ous authors are brought to the surface the 
reader is forced to actively participate as 
he judges the worth of each argument. 
Truly, it is an enjoyable and informative 
experience. 



The book requires basic knowledge of 
disease processes; it does not provide one 
with facts or solutions, but rather requires 
the physician to examine the foundations 
upon which his knowledge is based. It is 
a highly recommended text. 

.V University Is Born. By Margaret Byrnside 
Ballard, M.D. Union, West Virginia. 
1965. Medical Alumni Assn., U. of M., 
Baltimore, Md. $7.50 

"Let us not lightly cast aside things that 
belong to the past, for only with the past 
can we weave the fabric of the future." 
Thus wrote Anatole France, and we present 
his statement in defense of the value of 
historical considerations in these utilitarian 
times. 

The author's obstetrical background un- 
doubtedly influenced her selection of the 
title. She characterizes her work as a short 
genealogical sketch of the University of 
Maryland and not a definitive history; and 
states her threefold purpose as follows: 

"First — to show how the small unit of the 
Medical College of Maryland, through 
mergers and affiliations, finally, after more 
than 100 years grew into a true University. 

"Second — to bring the early fathers of 
the institution into present day perspective, 
to learn to know them, and to acclaim their 
work. 

"Third — to stimulate interest among the 
present Faculties and Students of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in their heritage." 

The first seven chapters depict the 
"embryology" of the future university. The 
engaging and detailed story continues to 
evolve in the final eleven chapters, each 
covering a decade through 1920; while the 
epilogue brings the reader down to date with 
a brief outline of significant events. Nine 
appendices present facsimilies of the im- 
portant legal acts which were basic in the 
evolution of the university; and also de- 
scriptions of the various institutions which 
were combined to form the University of 
Maryland. There are 215 text pages, and the 
appendices occupy 80 pages. There is an 
adequate combined index of subjects and 



October. 1966 



59 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNII'ERSITV OF MAKYLAND 



personal names. There are 3 1 unnumbered 
pages of illustrations placed together near 
the middle of the text. The binding is 
attractive and the text type is clear. 

The author's informal style facilitates easy 
reading so that the reader becomes ab- 
sorbed in the narrative. For her fresh view- 
point, and for the literary progeny born of 
the painstaking travail of extensive personal 
research, this reader is deeply grateful to the 
author; and it is his belief that she, a most 
loyal alumna of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine, has performed a real 
service for her Alma Mater and for the 
entire university. She has accomplished 
her "triplet" purpose admirably. The book 
is warmly recommended to all interested 
in the University of Maryland. 

John E. Savage. M.D. 

Ferment in Medicine. A Study of the Essence 
of Medical Practice and of its New 
Dilemmas by Richard M. Magraw, 
M.D., with collaboration of Daniel B. 
Magraw, M.B.A., 272 pp., W. B. 
Saunders Co., Philadelphia, 1966. 

Professor Richard Magraw, former 
family practitioner, long since a consultant 
in psychosomatic medicine at the University 
of Minnesota Hospitals, has written an ex- 
cellent book. In brief, his book represents 
the lecture material, background informa- 
tion, seminar topics, and wide range of 
charts and references which he has found 
useful in the instruction of senior medical 
students during their six months in the Com- 
prehensive Clinic at Minnesota. Lest the 
potential reader fear that the book is simply 
a pedantic outline, he need fear not. Draw- 
ing on a remarkable variety of quotations 
from physicians, social scientists, philoso- 
phers, administrators, and literary greats 
among others. Dr. Magraw, interspersing 
his own diversified experience, has forcefully 
portrayed the social and professional re- 
sponsibilities of the doctor and several of 
the major problems for medicine as a force 
in society. 



The first section of the book analyzes the 
doctor-patient relationship as a social con- 
tract, stressing the impact of psychological 
forces on both members of the contract. 
The obvious limitations produced in the 
physician by a disease-oriented viewpoint 
compared to a patient-oriented viewpoint 
are well described. The sense of frustration 
felt by many physicians, now in late-middle 
age, produced by the relative decrease in 
importance of the individual doctors in the 
delivery of care is also emphasized. 

For readers with a strong interest in the 
political role and position of medicine, the 
latter half of the book will be more exciting. 
There the author, rather dispassionately, 
analyzes some of the critical forces which 
are now and will in the future impact heavily 
on medicine and medical care. Important 
topics include doctor-hospital relationships, 
the research establishment, medical speciali- 
zation, the growth of the health professions 
as a whole, third party funding, automation 
in medicine, and emerging patterns of 
medical care and practice. 

The main theme of this book is, in my 
view, very critical but frequently overlooked 
in the academic setting (and, unfortunately, 
among practitioners as well). Dr. Magraw 
stresses, with good justification, the need for 
comprehensive medical care for all patients, 
rich or poor, urban or rural, medically 
sophisticated or not. There must be, in his 
view, some single physician or, less desir- 
ably, single system to assure each patient 
continuity of care emphasizing just those 
things lost sight of in the typical inpatient- 
oriented training of the great majority of 
American physicians. In an era of chronic 
diseases, more concern, in his view, about 
prevention, early diagnosis, rehabilitation, 
and health maintenance will be mandatory. 

In summary. Dr. Magraw has written a 
book on the social place of medicine and 
medical care which, I hope, large numbers of 
students, faculty, practitioners, and medical 
administrators will consider essential read- 
ing. 

Mitchell J. Rosenholtz, M.D. 



60 



Vol. 51. No. 4 




MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 



'Dean's 



LETTER 



Dear Members of the Alumni. Students and Friends of the Medical 
School: 

After careful study and faculty action as a result of the medical 
faculty workshop at College Park on June 13th-16th of this year, 
the Medical School will change its curriculum by a program of inte- 
grated teaching in both the basic science and clinical years. This 
means that teaching will not be done under departmental jurisdiction, 
but under the direction of a faculty committee using representative 
teachers from whatever department is deemed capable of conducting 
the teaching of the specific subject. The program will start in the 
basic science subjects in the fall of 1966 and hopefully progress to 
other years as the entering class of 1966 completes each phase of its 
four years study of medicine. 

This method of teaching will provide a better integration and 
coordination of subject matter with more thorough coverage of 
principles involved and will prevent needless duplication. The 
student will be expected to learn as a graduate student and will have 
more free time to devote to areas of his or her special interest. 



Sincerely, 



Wm. S. Stone, M.D. 
Dean 



October. 1966 



Ciirriculuiii Revision 1966 



Through a period from 1952-1954. ex- 
tensive curriculum changes were introduced 
in conformity with new concepts of teach- 
ing in both the clinical and basic science 
years, these changes being the result of im- 
provements in departmental staffing and the 
greater availability of full-time teachers. 
This curriculum continued in force until 
1963, when the faculty assembled for a 
week-long seminar devoted to medical edu- 
cation held at the Airlie House near 
Warrenton, Virginia. On this occasion, re- 
views of teaching methodology and the 
philosophies of modern medical education 
were studied in some depth and at the 
same time compared with existing curricula 
and techniques. From these deliberations 
emerged a new and revised concept of an 
on-going curriculum study by a permanent 
committee devoting its attentions exclusively 
to this academic problem. This committee 
began work in November, 1963. By June 
of 1966. its deliberations and conclusions 
had reached a point where a second faculty 
conference on problems of medical edu- 
cation was deemed advisable. 

Accordingly, a second conference on 
medical education was held at the Center for 
Adult Education in College Park during 
the week of June 13. 1966. At this time 
the curriculum committee unveiled the first 
fruits of its almost two-year study effort. 
Preliminary proposals for broad curriculum 
changes to be introduced gradually were 
presented. In general, these involved the 
gradual abandonment of the linear-year- 
course system with related didactic lectures, 
reverting the philosophy of medical edu- 
cation to that of a conceptual pyramid 
composed of segments, each of these being 
the result of the interaction of numerous 
disciplines and specialties, each subject re- 
lating to a concept of basic knowledge and 



its clinical application, the student being 
guided in the acquisition of detail which 
he would acquire by himself. 

Citrricuhnn change for First Year 
adopted. At a meeting of the faculty on 
July 7, 1966, the curriculum committee 
presented in some detail a revised curriculum 
for the first year. This was adopted and 
will be instituted with the class of 1970. In 
its general form, the curriculum is quite 
simple and is composed of four major 
divisions. 

Anatomy. In this revised concept, cell 
morphology, ultrastructure, cell function and 
genetics will be combined with conventional 
embryology and histology. The total 
scheduled time for gross anatomy has been 
reduced by 25%. Students will dissect an 
infant and only specific areas of an adulf 
cadaver. The routine complete dissection of 
an adult cadaver has been abandoned. This 
conjoined curriculum will be closely as- 
sociated with the second major unit known 
as the Biophysics, Biochemistry, Physiology, 
and Pharmacology curriculum (B.B.P.P.). 

B.B.P.P. Citrriciditm. This portion of the 
course will concern itself with tissue 
chemistry, cell chemistry, membrane phe- 
nomena, biophysical states, various meta- 
bolic systems, the physiology of normal 
organ function and the inter-relationship of 
organ systems. There will be a basic study 
of the effect of drugs on cells, tissue and 
organ function. 

Neurological Sciences. Paralleling the 
work of the curriculum committee, the 
neurological sciences group composed of 
representatives of Neurology, Neurosurgery, 
Neuropathology, Anatomy, Physiology, 
Pharmacology, Anesthesiology, and Electro- 
encephalography held numerous meetings to 
develop a neurologic curriculum designed 



I'ol. .-I. X. 



MEDICAI. SCHOOL SECTION 



to create lor the stiidenl a useful foundation 
in the hasic sciences and a continuing de- 
\elopment of conceptual knowledge in the 
clinical neurologic sciences. The deliber- 
ation of the committee resulted in a neuro- 
logical science curriculum which was actively 
in effect during the year 1965-1966 and 
which will he continued with improvements 
as part of the new adopted revised cur- 
riculum called "Neurological Science I" is 
as follows: 

The student is introduced to Neurological 
Science by way of formal courses in Neuro- 
anatomy and Neurophysiology which have 
been carefully integrated and which are 
taught in a parallel fashion with numerous 
mutual conferences between responsible in- 
structors. To these, some enrichment courses 
are appended from time to time with plans 
for clinical presentations in Neurology, 
Neurosurgery, Neuropharmacology, Anes- 
thesiology, and Neuropathology. There is 
no content curriculum to these enrichment 
subjects as they are used to give the student 
a growing purposeful insight into the re- 
lationship of the basic science activity to 
his ultimate practice of medicine and neu- 
rology. The "core" curriculum is reserved 
for the major field. 

Curriculum Study to Continue 

Already the curriculum committee has 
turned its attention to the development of 
the second year curriculum. The neurologic 
science group is actively engaged in develop- 
ing its second stage project to be called 
"Neuro'ogical Science II." As these inno- 
vations develop, they will be presented in 
these pages. 

Future 

It is hoped that continuing study and 
curriculum revision will result in a more 
closely knit interdepartmental approach to 
the problems of the medical student en- 
abling him to use the techniques and knowl- 
edge of basic science toward the better 
understanding and more rational scientific 
approach to the clinical management of 
human illness. 



PROiVIOTIONS ANNOUNCED 

Dr. William S. Stone, dean of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Medicine, 
has announced the promotion of six faculty 
members. Dr. William J. Adelman, Jr., Dr. 
Ra>mond A. Sjodin, and Dr. Matthew Tay- 
back have been promoted to full professor, 
and Dr. Safuh Attar, Dr. Charles G. 
Crispcns, Jr., and Dr. Richard B. Hornick 
have been promoted to associate professor. 

Dr. Adelman, named professor of physi- 
ology, has won international recognition for 
his basic research on nerve cells. He came 
to the University of Maryland in 1962 after 
three years at the National Institutes of 
Health working in the biophysics laboratory 
of Dr. Kenneth Cole. He had previously 
been a faculty member of the University of 
Buffalo School of Medicine for three years. 
An alumnus of Fordham University, he 
earned an M.S. degree at the University of 
Vermont and a Ph.D. at the University of 
Rochester. 

Dr. Adelman is a member of the 
Corporation of the Marine Biological 
Laboratory at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 
where he conducts physiological research 
during the summer months. He has also 
worked in England in the Physiological 
Laboratory of the University of Cambridge 
and at the Marine Biological Association in 
Plymouth. 

Dr. Adelman was recently elected a fel- 
low of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science and is a member 
of the American Physiological Society, the 
Biophysical Society, Sigma Xi, the Society 
of General Physiologists, and the Society 
for Experimental Biology and Medicine. 

Dr. Sjodin, named professor of biophysics, 
joined the then newly established depart- 
ment of biophysics in 1960 and has made 
many important contributions to its de- 
velopment. He has initiated new courses, 
helped to plan the graduate program and 
research activities, and cooperated with 
faculty members of other departments in 
teaching neurological science to medical 
students. 



October, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDJCLXE. U.\irEr<Srf)' OF MARVLAXD 



Dr. Sjodin's research programs are con- 
cerned with the discovery of basic 
mechanisms underlying the electrical ac- 
tivity of nerve and muscle cells. This re- 
search combines the methods of electrical 
measurement with radioactive tracer tech- 
niques to study ion movements across the 
cell membrane. He is the author of numer- 
ous major scientific papers relating to this 
work. In addition, he has performed work 
in collaboration with Dr. Adelman and Dr. 
Lorin J. Mullins. chairman of the depart- 
ment of biophysics. 

Dr. Sjodin earned a B.S. degree at the 
California Institute of Technology and a 
Ph.D. degree at the University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley. He did postdoctoral 
work at Purdue University, and as a fellow 
of the National Institutes of Health, he 
studied at the University of London and 
the University of Uppsala in Sweden. He 
is a member of the American Physiological 
Society, the Biophysical Society, and the 
Society of General Physiologists and is a 
fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science. He has been a 
participant in international scientific meet- 
ings at Buenos Aires. Moscow, Stockholm, 
and Tokyo. 

A member of the Corporation of the 
Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods 
Hole, Massachusetts, Dr. Sjodin is conduct- 
ing physiological research there during the 
summer months. 

Dr. Tayback, named professor of bio- 
statistics, is Deputy Commissioner of Health 
for the City of Baltimore. He has been with 
the Baltimore City Health Department since 
1949 and was previously a senior statistician 
for the New York State Health Department. 
He has been a member of the Maryland 
medical school faculty since 1952 and also 
lectures on biostatistics and public health 
administration at Hopkins. 

A graduate of Harvard, Dr. Tayback re- 
ceived an M.A. degree from Columbia and 
an Sc.D. degree from the Hopkins School 
of Hygiene and Public Health. He is a 
fellow of the American Public Health As- 
sociation. Results of his research, relating 



to epidemiology, public health administra- 
tion, program planning and evaluation, and 
population statistics, have been published 
in a number of professional journals. 

Dr. Attar, named associate professor of 
thoracic and cardiovascular surgery, is a 
native of Lebanon. He received his medical 
degree with honors from the American Uni- 
versity in Beirut, where he interned and 
trained in surgery and was chief resident 
in 1955. After spending a year as fellow 
in cardiovascular surgery with Dr. Michael 
E. DeBakey at Baylor University in Houston, 
he came to University Hospital in Baltimore 
to complete his training in thoracic surgery 
from 1957 to 1959. He is director of the 
thoracic surgery clinic at the University 
Hospital, attending thoracic surgeon at 
Mercy Hospital, and consultant to Mt. 
Wilson State Hospital. 

In addition to his clinical responsibilities, 
Dr. Attar is engaged in the study of coagu- 
lation changes in human shock and in 
evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygenation 
in the treatment of shock. He is the author 
of more than 65 papers on heart and vascu- 
lar surgery and related physiology, and has 
contributed to six books. He is a diplomate 
of the American Board of Surgery and the 
American Board of Thoracic Surgery and 
a member of 17 medical and professional 
organizations. 

Dr. Crispens, named associate professor 
of anatomy, has made a number of interest- 
ing discoveries relating to a virus found in 
association with cancers in mice. 

Winner of the Lederle Medical Faculty 
Award for 1964. Dr. Crispens teaches 
medical genetics at the medical school, 
where he has been a faculty member for the 
past six years. He came to Maryland after 
a year as postdoctoral fellow at Jackson 
Laboratory. Bar Harbor. Maine. He holds 
a B.S. degree from Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, an M.S. degree from Ohio State 
University, and a Ph.D. from Washington 
State University. Besides publishing many 
articles dealing wtih his study of cancer in 
birds and mice. Dr. Crispens is also the 



rol. 51, A", 



MEIUCAL SCHOOL SECTIOX 



author ot a reference book on North 
Americun game birds. 

Dr. Hornick, named associate professor 
of medicine, has been director of the di- 
vision of infectious diseases since July 1963. 
Long term clinical research with prisoner 
volunteers at the Maryland House of Cor- 
rection, conducted under his direction, has 
resulted in major advances in the control 
and understanding of several infectious dis- 
eases, including typhoid fever and Asian tlu. 

A native of Johnstown. Pennsylvania, Dr. 
Hornick received A.B. and M.D. degrees 
from The Johns Hopkins University. He 
interned and served a year of residency at 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital before a two- 



year assignment at the Walter Reed Medical 
Unit in Fort Detrick, Maryland. He joined 
the Maryland Medical School faculty in 
1959. 

Dr. Hornick is a diplomate of the 
American Board of Internal Medicine and 
a member of a number of professional 
societies including the American College of 
Physicians, the American Society for Micro- 
biology, the American College of Clinical 
Pharmacology and Chemotherapy, arid the 
Infectious Disease Society of America. He 
received the Alexander K. Barton Award 
from The Johns Hopkins University in 1951 
and the University of Maryland Outstand- 
ing Teaching Award in 1964. 




Department of Anatomy 

Dr. Theodore F. Leveque, Professor of 
Anatomy, recently attended the Fourth Inter- 
national Symposium on Neurosecretion, held 
in Strasbourg, France, July 25-27, 1966. 
Attendance at the meeting was by invitation 
only and included some 150 scientists repre- 
senting 13 countries. Dr. Leveque, an inter- 
nationally recognized authority in the field 
of neurosecretion, was an active participant 
in the open discussions of the symposium. 
Sessions were conducted in the newly con- 
structed Institut de Physiologie Generale 
de la Faculte des Sciences, Universite de 
Strasbourg. 

On his sabbatical leave, last year, Dr. 
Leveque and his family traveled to Stras- 
bourg where he expanded his studies on the 
glandular periventricular formations in the 
hypothalamus of the rat and the mouse. 



Dr. Gladys E. Wadsworth, Assistant Pro- 
fessor, worked as a research fellow at High- 
land View Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio, from 
April 18 to July 18, 1966. Dr. Wadsworth, 
having broad training in physical therapy 
and anatomy, participated in the Hand 
Kinesiology Study that is being conducted 
in Cleveland by the Ampersand Research 
Group for Medical Engineering. In the 
course of her work. Dr. Wadsworth used 
electromyographic techniques in her studies 
of muscles that move the fingers and the 
electrogoniometer — an instrument especially 
designed for the project — to study angular 
displacements of interphalangeal and meta- 
carpophalangeal joints during the recording 
of hand and forearm muscular activity. Dr. 
Wadsworth plans to apply some of the newer 
electromyographic techniques in her studies 
of kinesiology at the University of Mary- 
land. 



Department of Medicine 

Dr. Jerome K. Merlis, Chief of the 
Electroencephalographic Laboratory at the 
School of Medicine, is a consulting editor of 
the Journal of Electroencephalography and 
Clinical Neurophysiology. The journal, 
founded in 1947, is the official organ of the 
International Federation of Societies for 
Electroencephalography and Clinical Neuro- 
physiology. 



October, 1966 



Dr. Marie Andersch 
Retires 











Members of the faculty of the School 
of Medicine, members of the staff of the 
University Hospital and friends recently 
honored Dr. Marie Andersch at an informal 
reception at the University Hospital on the 
occasion of her retirement. Dr. Andersch 
was also honored by the Department of 
Medicine at a formal dinner attended by 
many members of that department. Dr. 
Andersch, a member of the faculty of the 
school for 23 years and Chief of the Bio- 
chemistry Section of the Clinical Laboratory, 
retires with the rank of Associate Professor 
of Medicine in Biochemistry. She was first 
appointed in 1943, coming to the University 
from a position as a Research Associate in 
the Department of Pathology at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. A native of Illinois, 
she received her Baccalaureate degree in 
1926, from the University of Illinois. For 
the next four years, she worked in the 
laboratories of the Michael Reese Hospital 
in Chicago. In 1933, she received the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree in Biochemistry at the 
University of Iowa. For the next year. Dr. 
Andersch remained at the University as a 
Research Assistant, leaving in 1934, to ac- 
cept a position of Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry of the Women's Medical College 



in Philadelphia. She accepted the Pittsburgh 
appointment two years before coming to 
the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Andersch's career at the School of 
Medicine and the Hospital is marked by a 
number of achievements. Not only did she 
continue to maintain a high standard of ex- 
cellence in the routine chemistry of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, but found time to develop 
new techniques and to publish more than 
25 contributions to the medical biochemical 
literature. 

In association with the late Dr. Milton 
S. Sachs. Dr. Andersch contributed to the 
development of the Clinical Laboratory and 
extensively to the curriculum of the Di- 
vision of Clinical Pathology. She was instru- 
mental in developing plans for a School of 
Laboratory Science and Technology. 

An expert in the field of clinical bio- 
chemistry, Dr. Andersch was frequently 
sought as a consultant by nearly all of the 
hospitals and institutes in the City of Balti- 
more and the State of Maryland. Her re- 
tirement thus culminates a long career in 
the service of medicine: a distinguished 
scientific career in biochemistry coupled with 
a high sense of devotion: a consistency of 
excellence and a fine personality. 



'ol. ."■!. A'o. 4 



Sof)n fflasion i&untilci', llr. 
ISOl = 1005 

John iMason Hundley, Jr. died at his home 
on December 8. 1965. after a short, acute 
illness. Known to his friends as "Jack" and 
to his former residents as "Chief" or more 
alTectionately as "Docus," Dr. Hundley will 
he remembered for his many accomplish- 
ments as Professor and Head of the De- 
partment of Gynecology at the University 
of Maryland School of Medicine and the 
University Hospital. His many publications 
reflect his particular interest in the diag- 
nosis and treatment of pelvic malignancy, 
female urology, and gynecologic pathology. 

Born in Baltimore on July 8. 1891, Dr. 
Hundley received his early education at 
Boys" Latin School. After receiving his 
.A.B. and M.A. degrees at St. John's College 
in .Annapolis. Maryland, he entered the 
Johns Hopkins University School of Medi- 
cine and was awarded his M.D. degree from 
that institution in 1916. 

His postgraduate training began with in- 
ternship and assistant residency at the Union 
Protestant Infirmary, now the Union 
Memorial Hospital. Further training was 
interrupted by service in the U. S. Army 
overseas as a 1st Lieutenant in the Medical 
Corps from July 5. 1918, to May 16, 1919. 
He returned to Baltimore in 1919 to con- 
tinue his residency training at the University 
Hospital serving as Chief Resident in 1921 
under his father, the late Dr. J. Mason 
Hundley. Sr.. then Professor of Gynecology. 

In 1930-31 Dr. Hundley studied abroad 
and brought back to the University the 
teaching of Professor Robert Meyer of 
Berlin and Professor Robert Schroeder of 
the University of Kiel. His interest in path- 
ology, phvsiology, and the then infant disci- 
pline of endocrinology was kindled by his ac- 
tivities in Germany and stimulated the de- 
velopment of clinical research of the physio- 
logic effects of pregnancy on the uterus and 



the relationship of ovarian hormones to 
ureteral peristalsis. 

In 1935 Dr. Hundley was appointed Pro- 
fessor of Gynecology and Head of the De- 
partment at the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. In this capacity he 
enlarged and improved the residency of 
female urology and established a female 
urologic clinic as a memorial to his father. 
He had an avid interest in cancer and with 
the late Dr. Grant Ward developed a De- 
partment of Oncology, pioneering in the 
establishment of improved methods of 
radium application in the treatment of pelvic 
malignancy. He was active in the American 
Cancer Society and served as President of 
the Maryland Division in 1941. Under the 
aegis of this society, he waged a never end- 
ing campaign towards the early diagnosis 
of malignancy, emphasizing the importance 
of regular, periodic examinations, and the 
inclusion of an adequate pelvic evaluation 
as a part of any routine examination. 

Dr. Hundley was very proud of his father, 
also an illustrious gynecologist. In addition 
to the establishment of the cystoscopic clinic 
at the University Hospital, he endowed an 
operating room at the Hospital for the 
Women of Maryland in honor of his father 
and in 1961 established the "J. Mason 
Hundley, M.D., Annual Lecture in Gyne- 
cology" at the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty of the State of Maryland. 

Dr. Hundley was a member of many 
organizations including the American Gyne- 
cologic Society, the American Association 
of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the 
American Urologic Association, and the 
American College of Surgeons as well as the 
Baltimore City Medical Society and the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the State 
of Maryland. 

Dr. Hundley loved to entertain and used 
his home to delight his friends with frequent 
evenings of delicious food, music, and con- 
geniality. He was a raconteur par ex- 



Octobcr. 1966 




W. i^clson Carcp 
1003 = 1966 



I'ol. ?1. Xo. 4 



Thomas Nelson Carey was a clinician 
who cared for patients and who practiced 
medicine to the absolute satisfaction of re- 
ferring physicians. The pace which he fol- 
lowed relentlessly in spite of personal health 
handicaps was a source of concern and 
inspiration to his friends. Devotion to the 
patient's welfare set an example which in- 
spired many students and house officers to 
perform up to their highest capabilities; they 
were rewarded through their rich clinical 
experiences with him. Nelson died on March 
11, 1966, after brief hospitalization at the 
Mercy Hospital. 

A native Baltimorean, Nelson was the son 
of Thomas and Grace Carey, who lived at 
422 Kenneth Square in Govans. Born on 
December 15, 1903. his early childhood 
was spent in Baltimore: he attended public 
schools graduating from Loyola High School 
in 1919. He was awarded a Baccalaureate 
Degree from Loyola College in 1923 and 
his Degree in Medicine from the University 
of Maryland School of Medicine in 1927. 
While in medical school. Nelson was 
awarded the Hitchcock and Randolph 
Winslow Scholarship in recognition of aca- 
demic achievement which culminated in 
his selection for the Faculty Gold Medal 
emblematic of highest class honors. The 
financial costs of his education were earned 
in various ways including working as a 
soda clerk in MacGillivray's Pharmacy 
where he worked circles around good em- 
ployees. After graduation Nelson gained 
the reputation for accuracy and efficiency 
as an intern and medical resident at the 
Mercy Hospital. Long, tiring hours were 
taken in stride and patient workups were 
thorough. Always a scholar, he terminated 
his formal postgraduate education in 1930 
with a year of fellowship at the Johns 



Hopkins Hospital working on problems of 
allergy under Dr. Leslie Gay. 

Nelson opened his office for medical prac- 
tice in 1931 at 1014 St. Paul Street where 
patients consulted him for 35 years. Quick 
in decision he had unusual ability as a diag- 
nostician and thrived on difficult clinical 
problems. Knack for sifting the routine 
from the difficult and promptly reaching an 
accurate conclusion spared his patients from 
long hospitalizations. Surgeons eagerly gave 
service because of his astute judgment. 
Frequently, he correctly advised surgical 
intervention in spite of conflicting x-ray or 
laboratory evidence which he regarded only 
as confirmatory aids. Final judgment was 
predicated on careful analysis of the history 
and bedside manifestations. Always there 
was anecdotal phrase circulating the hospital 
staff highlighting an experience with him 
in the sickroom. On one occasion when an 
ill recalcitrant patient, hospitalized for 
several weeks, complained, "You can't have 
any more tests to do," Nelson retorted, "Yes, 
there is one more, your post mortem ex- 
amination." 

Nelson continuously carried a heavy 
hospital and office practice and in spite of 
the responsibility and concern which diffi- 
cult problems provoke, he gave confidence 
and was constantly sensitive to patient's 
needs. He delighted in sifting out clinical 
puzzles for the referring physician, an attri- 
bute which was largely responsible for his 
large consulting practice. Patient service was 
rendered promptly during weekdays, nights 
or Sundays and similar standards were ex- 
pected of those under him. Nelson was 
constantly seen walking the hospital corri- 
dors with stacks of medical records. Re- 
ports to doctors were dispatched promptly 
and were remarkable for their clarity, 



October, 1966 



^ULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICISE. UMrERSITV OF MARYLAND 



brevity, diagnostic accuracy, and wisdom of 
his therapeutic regimen. Physicians con- 
sulted him for personal medical care, a 
recognized accolade of ability and sincerity 
Baltimore has had a rich tradition of 
clinicians such as Hamman, Wilson and 
Pincoffs. Nelson Carey was a member of 
this class of men. 

Medical students had Nelson Carey as 
their personal physician for many years. For 
more than two decades his private medical 
service was a major teaching unit for house 
officers. Patient referrals came from phy- 
sicians throughout Baltimore, Maryland and 
neighboring states providing a practice 
which cut across all segments of clinical 
medicine. This truly teaching service pro- 
vided a rich experience for interns and resi- 
dents; those who occasionally shirked duty 
were sharply rebuked. House officers en- 
joyed serving him. 

Nelson read extensively and kept abreast 
of pertinent advances in the medical litera- 
ture. A patient with Streptohacilhis monilo- 
formis infection was correctly diagnosed by 
him at the Mercy Hospital after casual con- 
versation with a resident who related the 
manifestations of fever, arthritis, and rash. 
His patients were generously made available 
to associates for clinical study and he per- 
sonally reported interesting case studies. One 
of his patients is the first reported instance 
of Coxsackie Virus myocarditis in an adult. 
Nelson's knowledge embraced various 
medical subspecialties, particularly infectious 
diseases, metabolic, and allergic disorders. 
With his fundamental knowledge of the 
natural patterns of disease, he had the ad- 
ditional keen sense of detecting key changes 
at the bedside. These provided leads for 
fruitful investigation which he unselfishly 
shared with full-time colleagues. In this way 
his personal suggestions led to the use of 
Flexin in treatment of gout. Nelson had an 
agile mind which he used well. 

The School of Medicine and Hospital are 
in his perennial debt for dedicated service. 
Early in his career he carried a heavy teach- 
ing schedule and with the exodus of large 
segments of the faculty in World War II, 



he taxed himself unsparingly. Daily ward 
teaching and the conduct of a huge consult- 
ing practice served as essential programs for 
instruction of young physicians. Students 
packed Gordon Wilson Hall from 1942-46 
to hear his presentations at the weekly 
clinical pathological conference; they re- 
ferred to him as "T.N.T." From 1948 to 
1949, Nelson directed the Department of 
Medicine in the capacity of Acting Head. 
His interest in career advancement of 
medical students and house staff is shown 
by his many letters endorsing them for 
positions in other teaching hospitals. These 
letters described the candidate accurately; 
they were crisp, honest, and without undue 
flare. 

Friends knew of his sharp wit and his 
love for quoting the classic literature. He 
was an avid reader of prose, poetry, and 
modern satire. Marquand was a special 
favorite. La Tosca and Rigoletto his favorite 
operas, and Mozart his favorite composer. 
The shore provided necessary respite from 
routine during part of the summer and in 
later years Nelson and Mary relaxed in 
New York or Boston taking in the shows 
and enjoying other cultural outlets. A trip 
to Ireland in 1962 gave them special 
pleasure. 

On the evening of January 29. 1963, 
Nelson's medical associates joined with his 
loving family to pay homage on the oc- 
casion of a testimonial dinner when he re- 
ceived the traditional Maryland chair and 
plaque appropriately inscribed: "T. Nelson 
Carey, M.D., F.A.C.P.. with fond apprecia- 
tion for his many years of devoted service 
as a talented, tireless clinician and as an in- 
spirinf; teaclier." 

A University teaching hospital can ill- 
afford to reduce such a brilliant internist 
from its ranks, a true clinician, reliable 
friend, capable teacher and one who so 
effectively related the practice of specialty 
medicine to a University teaching center. 
Nelson's loss is more apparent with time: 
missed because of the example which he set 
for others, for his high ethical standards and 
for his dedication to good medicine. 



Vol. 51. Xo. 4 



MEDICAL SCIIOOI. SllCTlOX 



Nelson held membership in the American 
College of Physicians, the American Medical 
Association, the Baltimore City Medical 
Society, the Maryland Medical and Chirurgi- 
cal Faculty and he was a Diplomate of the 
American Board of Internal Medicine. In 
1966, prior to his death, the Maryland 
Medical Alumni Association appropriately 
awarded him its Gold Medal and Honor 
Award. This is the highest accolade of the 
Association for outstanding contributions 
to medicine and distinguished sers'ice to man- 
kind. 

In 1924, the following was said of Thomas 
Nelson Carey in a letter supporting his 
application to the medical school, "'He Is 
the type of young man we want in the 
medical profession at the present day." This 
prophecy was richly fulfilled. 

The staff members of the University and 
Mercy Hospitals and the Sisters of Mercy 
tender their sympathy to Mrs. Mary C. 
Carey and to his children. Mrs. Margaret C. 
Maher; Mr. Thomas N. Carey, Jr.. and 
Miss Mary Frances Carey who survive him. 
Throughout his adult life this warm family 
circle provided him the solace and strength 
so necessary to support his intense and dedi- 
cated way of life. Heartfelt gratitude is ex- 
pressed to his gracious wife, Mary, by those 
physicians who were enriched through their 
pleasant associations with him. 

Theodore E. WooDw.'kRD. M.D. 



cellence and often held his fellow members 
of the Splint Club entranced by his anec- 
dotes. 

In 1955 Dr. Hundley was made Emeritus 
Professor and in 1958 he retired from prac- 
tice. He represented an era in the develop- 
ment of the University of Maryland marked 
by conservatism, scrupulous intellectual 
honesty, and a dedication to provide the 
best in patient care. 

He is survived by his widow, the former 
Emily Louise Holt, a brother, and two 
sisters. 

Everett S. Diggs, M.D. 



Albert E. Goldstein Memorial 
Fund Organized 

Officers have been recently chosen for 
the Dr. Albert E. Goldstein Memorial Fund 
which will honor the many contributions to 
the medical profession and to the community 
by the late physician whose death was 
recently announced. 

Offices of the fund, which will have head- 
quarters in Suite 912, Fidelity Building, 
Baltimore, Maryland, are as follows: Presi- 
dent, Louis J, Kolodner, M.D., Vice Presi- 
dents: John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Albert 
A. Shuger, Leonard A. Siems; Treasurer, 
Frank Fisher; Secretary and Assistant 
Treasurer, Moses W. Rosenfeld. Members 
of the Committee include the following: 
John Askin. M.D., Louis Bachrach, M.D., 
Louis Diener, M.D., Robert B. Goldstein, 
M.D.. Milton Kirsh. M.D., Irving R. Lo- 
witz. M.D.. Nathan E. Needle, M.D., Marvin 
S. Plant, H. Melvin Radman, M.D., Martin 
A. Robbins, M.D., Louis Sachs, M.D., John 
Sargeant, Herman Seidel, M.D., Milton 
Sherry, M.D., Abraham Silver, M.D., 
William H. Triplett, M.D., Sheldon Wengel, 
and Israel S. Sinberg, M.D. 

The committee was formed after many 
friends of the late Dr. Goldstein spontane- 
ously proposed the establishment of a 
memorial tribute. They cited his long and 
distinguished career at Sinai Hospital and 
Levindale, his leadership of the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty, and his life-long in- 
fluence upon and contributions to his 
students and colleagues at the University 
of Maryland as a mark of the boundless 
energy and unlimited talents possessed by 
Dr. Goldstein. 

A goal of $50,000 with the aim of initiat- 
ing programs, lectureships and awards of 
interest to the young physician. 

Contributions to the fund, tax exempt, 
may be made payable to the Albert E. Gold- 
stein Memorial Fund Incorporated. 912 
Fidelity Building. Baltimore. Maryland 
21201. 



October, 1966 




r ^. jFricbentonlt) 
1879= 1966 



On May 22, 1966, death came to Edgar 
B. Friedenwald, the last surviving member 
of the famous family and dynasty of Balti- 
more physicians and scholars which began 
with his father Dr. Aaron Friedenwald, who 
graduated from the old Maryland Medical 
College in 1860 and who was a prominent 
practitioner and ophthalmologist in Balti- 
more throughout the last century. Dr. Edgar, 
as he was often affectionally called, had 
been in failing health for a number of years. 
Death came at Mercy Hospital where he 
had been Chief of the Pediatric Service from 
1923 to his retirement in 1950. 

Dr. Edgar's father had been active in the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. In 1890 
he delivered a dedicatory address at the old 
Mercy Hospital in Baltimore at which 
hospital many of the older Alumni received 
their training. Seventy-three years later, his 
son Edgar delivered the dedication address 
at the opening of the new Mercy Hospital. 

Two older brothers of Dr. Edgar, Harry 
and Julius, were professors of ophthalmology 
and gastroenterology respectively, in the 
School of Medicine in the University of 
Maryland. Another brother, Bernard, prac- 
ticed dentistry following graduation from 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 
A son, Jonas, died a few years ago; a well 
known figure in the field of ophthalmology. 

At the time of his death. Dr. Edgar had 
been compiling data on a history of pedi- 
atrics in Maryland for future publication 
as a book. He was also the author of many 
articles on children's diseases. 

Dr. Friedenwald was born in Baltimore 
on November 20, 1 879, at a period when 
pediatrics was not considered yet a full 
specialty. His early education began in the 



r<-/. 51. Xo. 4 



t>kl Scheibc School uhich was associaloil 
with Zion Lutheran Church, graduating 
Irom this school and later from the Baltimore 
City College in the Class of 1899. He was 
a member of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in the Class of 1903. Following 
his graduation, he settled in Pun.xsutawny. 
Pennsylvania, as a coal-mine surgeon and 
general practitioner for the local community. 
His only child. Aaron, now an army oHicer. 
was born in Charleston. West Virginia. 

After a few years the young pediatrician- 
to-be decided on postgraduate training and 
after spending a year at Johns Hopkins 
Hospital, he sojourned to Berlin for further 
work and studies with the eminent professors 
Finkelstein and Huebner. At that period 
Germany was the mecca for postgraduate 
training in most specialties and particularly 
in the field of medicine and pediatrics. 

Upon his return to Baltimore in 1911, Dr. 
Friedenwald began his practice of pediatrics 
with an office at 1528 Madison Avenue. His 
teaching career also started at that time and 
he taught his specialty at Mercy Hospital 
and at the old Hebrew Hospital (now the 
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore). His ability 
was shortly honored by his appointment of 
Chief of Pediatrics at the Mercy Hospital 
and later at the Sinai Hospital. At about the 
same time, he joined the Medical Reserve 
Corps and during World War I served as 
a regimental surgeon with the 26th Infantry 
Regiment first on the Mexican border and 
later with the 38th Infantry at old Fort 
Oglethorpe. Georgia. In 1916 he served 
in France as a major in the Third Infantry 
Division's 38th Regiment near Chateau 
Thierry and took a part in the Battle of the 
Marne. Upon his military discharge at the 
end of World War I, he returned to the 
United States and to his practice of medi- 
cine. At his funeral on May 24th, full mili- 
tary honors were accorded him at the time 
of his burial in the Arlington National 
Cemetery. 

In the years 1919 to 1921, he played an 
important part in the consolidation of the 
University of Maryland School of Medicine 
with the old College of Physicians and 



Edgar B. Friedenwald. m.d. 

Pmfttsor of Oinical Paltatnci, Emrnlus 
I'NIVERSITV OK MARVl.A.M) 

W t. tiis friends colleagues and former '■ludenl', lirrrbv 
honor him, in appreciation of his lo\al and faithful M'r%ic'e 
to all children; to Mercy Hospital Pediatrics; and to the 
medical school. ^ A-« a permanent symbol of our esteem and 
re^tpecl, we do hereby and hereunto affix our hand and 
seal this twelfth day of April in the year nineteen hundred 




Surgeons. Later, through Dr. Friedenwald's 
leadership the department of pediatrics at 
Mercy Hospital became one of the leading 
facilities in the State for the management of 
illnesses of children. The word pediatrics 
at the Mercy Hospital was synonymous with 
the name Dr. Edgar. He rose rapidly in 
faculty rank and became Professor in the 
mid 1920's. 

Following his retirement he suffered a 
continued series of cerebral vascular oc- 
clusions which forced his retirement from 
active teaching and practice; however, he 
kept in touch with the affairs of the medical 
world and particularly in the field of pedi- 
atrics. His presence at meetings was a 
familiar one and his kindly and friendly 
smile was always evident. In 1953 he was 
honored by pediatricians and by his Mercy 
and University Hospital colleagues at a 
testimonial dinner. In 1959 he was awarded 
the Annual Medical Alumni Award and 
Gold Key for outstanding contributions to 
medicine and service to mankind. He was 
an advisor, consultant to the younger men, 
an able clinician, investigator and adminis- 
trator. He was indeed an inspiration to his 
colleagues and many friends throughout the 
city. State and nation. 

Samuel S. Click, M.D., F.A.A.P. 



October, 1966 



£ 



likj 



OFFICERS 
President 

Howard B. Mavs. M.D. 



President-EIect 

John O. Sharre 



, M.D. 



Vice-Presidents 

Benjamin M. Stein, M.D. 

Patricia Dood, M.D. 

Raymond M. Cunningham, M.D. 

Treasurer 

Walter E. Karfgin, M.D. 



Executive Director 

William H. Triplett. M.D. 

Executive Secretary 

Mrs. Louise Girkin 

Board of Directors 

William H. Kammer. Jr., M.D. 
Robert B. Goldstein, M.D. 
John D. Young, M.D. 
Harry C. Bowie. M.D. 
Theodore Stacy. M.D. 
Wilford H.Townshend, Jr., M.D. 
John C. Dumler, Sr., M.D. 
W. Kenneth Mansfield, M.D. 
J. Howard Franz, M.D. 

(ex-officio) 
C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 

(ex-officio) 

Nominating Committee 



J. 


Howard Fran 

(ex-officio) 


z, M.D. 




c. 


Parke Scarborough, 
(cx-offiaaj 


M.D. 


IJ 


McClelland 


Dixon, 


M.D. 


J A 


MES R. Karns 


M.D. 




Et 


ward F. Cott 


ER, M.D 




Representatives 
General Alumn 


to 
Counc 


il 


H 


3WARD B. Mai 

i-x-offiao) 


s, M.D. 




Representatives 
Editorial Board 

To l.c iiami-d. 


, BULLETIN 


Re 
Fa 


presentatives 
culty Board 


to 




To 


be named. 







(3-year terra began June, 1965) 
C. Parke Scarborough, M.D. 
Howard B. Mays, M.D. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
SECTION 



President's Letter 



Fellow Medical Alumni: 

The election to the presidency of the Medical Alumni 
Association is a very real honor and will. I hope, afford 
an opportunity to be of service in this area of Uni- 
versity activity. The excellent work of my predecessors 
is a real challenge and the results of the efforts of the 
many dedicated members of the Association will, I hope, 
be given further impetus during the coming year. Much 
progress has been made in recent years assuring the 
Alumni Association of a rightful place as a constructive 
force in the affairs of the University as related to past 
and future graduates of the Medical School. 

Interest in the Association has been steadily in- 
creasing. The present membership numbers 1988 of a 
total of 4,100 known living graduates of the Medical 
School. There are about 400 graduates over 50 years 
of age whom we are pleased to honor in a very special 
category. These really impressive figures, among the 
highest in the country, give some indication of the 
place of Maryland graduates in the medical world and 
a suggestion of the capacity for constructive influence 
in furthering the stature of the University. That the 
number of active members is not greater is perhaps more 
a matter of effective communication than apathy and 
I feel confident that a steadily increasing interest and 
response will be forthcoming. 

An effective Alumni Association must have the con- 
tinuing interest and active support of all graduates if 
the grand tradition of the past and the very certain 
bright future of the University of Maryland Medical 
School is to continue. The effective future of the Alumni 
Association as a beneficial force depends in a significant 
measure upon the recognition of changes that have 
taken place within the Medical School, the associated 
hospitals, and, in fact, of all areas of medical activity 
throughout the land. New faculty appointments are 
being continuously made in order that the scope and 
excellence of teaching may continue. We must show 

.xiv }'i>l. 51, No. 4 



that they arc welcome and that their continuing eilorts 
arc appreciated in an atmosphere of mutual interest. 

The functions of the Alumni Association have been 
increasing and among the foremost capacities for service 
is the development and maintenance of a repository of 
information relating to every graduate. This cumulative 
information must be of a degree of completeness and 
availability as to be immediately available not only 
for Association purposes but equally for the Medical 
School, the important graduate Medical and Surgical 
Associations, the publications of the University and for 
cooperation with the General Alumni Association. 

I believe that the Medical Alumni Association must 
remain a separate entity. The existence of a General 
Alumni Association is important to the affairs of the 
University of Maryland as a whole. We have in the 
past and I believe we will continue to be cooperative 
and a supporting factor in the General Alumni Associa- 
tion. However the Medical School has a very old and 
honorable tradition and must continue to enlarge its 
sphere. Many graduates have expressed a desire for a 
separate identity and we proposed to maintain and 
energetically support this concept of Alumni organiza- 
tion. 

Though the numbers of graduates is great and the 
interest of many in the Association and School has 
been effectively demonstrated, our affairs, have, in 
fact, been carried on by a dedicated relatively small 
number. Geographic distribution must be considered 
in the interests of an effective Board. However your 
very enthusiastic support is needed and your suggestions 
and contributions in the conduct of the affairs of the 
Association are earnestly solicited. 




Howard B. Mays, M.D. 
President 



Roster of Senior Aluiniii 



Since 1964, Alumni of the University of 
Maryland. Baltimore Medical College and 
College of Physicians and Surgeons who 
have been graduated more than fifty years 
had been specially and appropriately listed 
once each year in the pages of the Bulletin. 

With the celebration of the last half 
century class in 1965. the Alumni of the 
three schools have now officially merged as 
they join the senior group. 

So long as they shall live the individual 
Alumni of the three schools shall be listed 
annually in the Bulletin so that the identity 
of these physicians can be properly main- 
tained. In addition, the Medical Alumni 
Association proposes to list all of the known 
graduates of the School of Medicine. 

The School and the Alumni Association 
do not propose to forget these honored 
Alumni subsequent to their receiving their 
fifty-year diploma. Instead the younger 
men might well refer to this senior group 
for advice. 

The following Alumni of the University 
of Maryland. Baltimore Medical College or 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons have 
been in practice fifty years or longer: 



Senior Alumni 

William Clay Abel, M.D., '01, BMC 
2314 Frace Ave. 
Orlando. Fla. 

A. W. Adkins, M.D., '12, P&S 
361 HillsboroSt. 
Lexington, Ky. 40505 

Andrew A. Anderson. M.D., '12. P&S 
1101 Deseret Bldg. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

James Leiand Anderson, M.D.. '08, UofM 
213 Butler Ave. or 68 B Vardry St. Med. Ct. 
Greenville, S. C. 29607 



Charles W. Armstrong. M.D., '14, UofM 
629 Mitchell Ave. 
Salisbury, N.C. 28144 

Richard T. Arnest, M.D.. '16, UofM 
Hague, Va. 22469 

Walter Cathcart Arthur, M.D., '97, UofM 
2225 Fifteenth St. 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 44223 

Wm. Richard Arthur, Md., '97, UofM 
2627 S.E. 27th Ave. 
Miami, Fla. 33133 

Oscar T. Barber, M.D., '08, P&S 
Health Officer 
53 Temple St. 
Fredonia, N. Y. 

Yates M. Barber. M.D., '14, UofM 

275-3 

Warsaw, Va. 22572 

Carl J. Baumgartner. M.D., '11, P&S 
4841 River Point Rd. 
Jacksonville. Fla. 32207 

George A. Bawden. M.D.. '16, UofM 
1110 The Broadview 
Baltimore. Md. 21210 

Philip Bean. M.D.. '13. UofM 
Great Mills, Md. 20634 

Elmer Jos. Beaulieu. M.D., '07, BMC 
215 South Ave. 
Whitman, Mass. 02382 

Lt. Col. C. L. Beaven. M.D.. '08. BMC 
1417 Burton wood Dr. 
Alexandria. Va. 22307 

William F. Beckner. M.D.. '11, BMC 
713 West Virginia Bldg. 
Huntington. W. Va. 

Frederick V. Beitler. M.D.. '06. UofM 
1014 Francis Ave. 
Baltimore. Md. 21227 

Harry J. Bennett. M.D., '06, BMC 
121 N. Julian St. 
Ebensburg, Pa. 15931 



r,./. .-I. Xo. 4 



.irjwfxi .issoci.irio.y sncriox 



Clarence Irvint; Benson. M.D.. 'O';, UofM 

Box 123 

Port Deposit. Md. 21904 

IJuaai H. Benson. M.D.. UofM 

Hampton House. Apt. 204 

204 H. Joppa Rd. 

Baltimore. Md. 21204 

Harry Melchior BilTar. "12, P&S 

144-31 14th Ave. 

Flushini;. N.Y. 11357 

Col. Harry Alo\sius Bishop. M.D.. '1 

UofM 
37 IS Manor Road 
Chevy Chase. Maryland 20015 
Dr. Rafael Bernabe. "13, P&S 
6 1 Savador Brau St. 
San Juan, P. R. 

William P. Black. M.D.. '14. P&S 
111 Capitol St. 
Charleston, W. Va. 25300 
Lowrie W. Blake. M.D.. '14. UofM 
5609 7th Ave. Dr. W. 
Bradenton. Florida 33505 
Walter D. Blankenship, M.D., '10, P&S 
3 1 Sunset Place 
Lancaster, Pa. 

James G. Blovser. M.D.. "05. P&S 
30S Rose Blvd. 
Akron. Ohio 44302 
Ray Maxwell Bobbitt, M.D., '13, P&S 
1139 4th Ave. 
Huntington, W. Va. 
O. H. Bobitt, M.D., '14, P&S 
863 24th Ave., N. 
St. Petersburg. Fla. 33713 
Alvah P. Bohannan. M.D.. '05. UofM 
Virgilina, Va. 24598 
Lawrence F. Boland. M.D., '11. BMC 
P. O. Box 339 
Frankfort. Kentucky 40601 
Wm. P. Bonar. M.D.. '06. P&S 
1006 Tomlinson Ave. 
Moundsville. W. Va. 26041 
Robert A. Bonner. Sr., M.D.. '12. UofM 
51 West Main Street 
Waterbury. Connecticut 06702 
Charles F. Bove. M.D.. "13. BMC 
70 E. Main St. 
Patchoaue, N. Y. 11772 



Wm. Ward Braithwaite. M.D.. "09. UofM 

3 16 Jasmine Ave. 

Corona Del Mar. Calif. 92625 

Lee Bransford. M.D.. '10. BMC 

12S2 May fair Rd. 

Jacksonville. Fla. 32207 

Thomas Latham Bray. M.D.. 16. UofM 

Box 576 

Plymouth, N. C. 27962 

Harrison L. Brchmer. M.D.. "10. P&S 

106 Girard Blvd.. S.E. 

Albuquerque. N. Mexico 87106 

James C. Brogden. M.D.. '14, UofM 

210UticaSq. Med. Ctr. 

1980UticaSq. 

Tulsa. Okla. 74114 

Charles R. Brooke, M.D., '16, UofM 

VA Hospital 

East Orange, N. J. 07019 

Frank J. Broschart, M.D., '11, BMC 

8 Russell Ave. 

Gaithersburg, Md. 20760 

Morton Brotman, M.D., '14, UofM 

212SouthOrange Ave.. Apt. #10 

South Orange. N. J. 07079 

Archie Eugene Brown, M.D., "1 1, UofM 

918 Poinsett Highway 

Greenville, S. C. 29609 

Joseph Edward Brumback, M.D., '09, BMC 

Medical Arts Bldg. 

Baltimore, Md. 21201 

B. Bruce Brumbaugh, M.D., '16, UofM 

5609 Main St. 

Elkridge, Md. 21227 

Jesus Maria Buch. M.D.. '13. UofM 

1004 E. 36th St. 

Baltimore. Md. 21218 

Sidney Eli Buchanan, '12, UofM 

390 S. Union St. 

Concord, N. C. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., '16, UofM 

5005 Edmondson Ave. 

Baltimore, Md. 21229 

Louis Arthur Buie. M.D., '15, UofM 

200 First St., S.W. 

Rochester, Minn. 55901 

Frank Burden. M.D.. '05. UofM 

if 3 Bagshaw Ave. 

Brishton. South Australia 



October. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. UXWERSITY OF .\L-!RVL.-tXD 



J. J. Burne, M.D., '10, P&S 
101 N. Grove St. 
EastOrange. N.J. 07017 

Ira Burns, M.D., '05, UofM 
2800 N. Atlantic, Apt. 605 
Daytona Beach, Fla. 32018 

Julian G. Busby, M.D., '04, UofM 
901 W. Henderson St. 
Salisbury, N. C. 28144 

Lawrence A. Cahill, M.D.. '11, BMC 
361 Lafayette St. 
Newark, N.J. 07105 

Charles A. Cahn, M.D., "15, UofM 
2145 W.Baltimore St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21223 

Fred Glover Campbell, M.D., '11, BMC 

Warren, Maine 04864 

Jesse W. Campbell, M.D., "09, BMC 

923 Philadelphia St. 

Indiana. Pa. 

Ovid Sylvester Campbell, M.D., '10, P&S 

Grafton, W. Va. 

Harry Arthur Cantwell, M.D., '06, UofM 

Cecil Ave. 

NorthEast,Md. 21901 

Honorio F. Carrasquillo, M.D., "16, UofM 

Hotel Commodore 

42nd & Lexington Ave. 

New York, N.Y. 10017 

Manuel G. Carrera, M.D., '14, P&S 

101 N. Union St. 

Fajardo, P. R. 00648 

Col. Henry P. Carter, M.D., "03, UofM 

3445 B S. Stafford St. 

Arlington, Va. 

Arthur Casilli, M.D., '14, UofM 

618 Newark Ave. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 07203 

Guiseppe Caturani, M.D., "10, UofM 

348 E. II 6th St. 

New York, N.Y. 10029 

Michael Edward Cavallo, M.D.. '16, UofM 

265 Lafayette St. 

New York, N.Y. 10012 

James Jennings Chandler, M.D., '16, UofM 
1 32 N.Washington St. 
Sumter. S.C. 29150 



Lucien Romeo Chaput, M.D., '16, UofM 

3 Washington Sq. 

Haverhill, Mass. 01830 

Louis Chargin, M.D., '02, BMC 

1 W. 85th St. 

New York. N.Y. 10024 

Charles Peter Clautice, M.D., '12, UofM 

3013 St. Paul St. 

Baltimore, Md. 21202 

Hubert Claytor, M.D.. '86, UofM 

Hopkins. S. C. 

Morris D. Cohen, M.D., "04, P&S 

1534 East Speedway 

Tucson, Arizona 85719 

Ralph Cohen, M.D., '15, UofM 

231 1 University Blvd. West 

Silver Spring. Md. 20902 

Joseph Coleman, M.D.. '04. UofM 

455 West 23rd St. 

New York. N.Y. 10011 

Clarence E. Collins, M.D., '02, UofM 

"The Hygeia" Hall Highway 

Crisfield,Md. 21817 

Wm. Stanislaus Conway, M.D., '10, UofM 

3210 E. Perkins Ave. 

Sandusky, Ohio 

Everett L. Cook, M.D., '14, UofM 

130SladeAve.. Apt. 306 

Baltimore, Md. 21208 

C. Melvin Coon, M.D.. '03, UofM 

Milan, Pa. 

Everett Roy Cooper, M.D., '12, P&S 

Troy. W. Va. 

Earle Somerville Coster, M.D., '06, UofM 

Solomons, Md. 20688 

George C. Coulbourne, M.D., '10, UofM 

Marion, Md. 21838 

Franklin Clyde Craven, M.D., "13, UofM 

525 Sunset Ave. 

Ashboro, N. C. 

Henry L. Criss, M.D., UofM 

218 Adams St. 

Fairmont, W. Va. 

Denis J. Cronin, M.D., '10. UofM 

1007 4th Ave. 

Huntington, W. Va. 

Gilbert L. Dailey, M.D., '14, UofM 

618 3rd St. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 17101 



Vol. 51, No. 4 



ALUMM .ISSOCIATIOX SECTION 



M. Tolbert Dalton. M.D., '06. UofM 
6811 50th Ave., N.E. 
Seattle 15. Wash. 

Charles D. Daly. M.D.. '10. P&S 
139 Warrenton Ave. 
Hartford, Conn. 06105 

George Davis. M.D., '08, UofM 
28 South Church St. 
Waynesboro. Pa. 

Theodore McCann Davis. M.D.. '14. UofM 

108 Vannoy St. 

Greenville. S. C. 

Harry Deibel. M.D.. 12. UofM 

1226 Hanover St. 

Baltimore. Md. 21230 

Walter L. Denny. Jr.. M.D.. '14. UofM 

3908 N. Charles St. 

Baltimore. Md. 21218 

James DePasquale. M.D.. "08. BMC 

530 E. 234th St. 

NewYork. N. Y. 10470 

James E. Diehl. M.D.. '11. UofM 

1 627 Hanover Ave. 

Richmond 20. Va. 

Louis Diener. M.D.. '15, UofM 

2511 Eutaw Place 

Baltimore. Md. 21217 

Wm. J. Dillon. M.D.. '16. UofM 

162 Maple St. 

Springfield, Mass. 01105 

J. D. Dinsmore. M.D.. '09, UofM 

Port Clyde 

Nova Scotia. Canada 

Edward P. Disbrow. M.D., '08. P&S 

15 Irving St.. Apt. 9 

Worcester. Mass. 01610 

James Sylvester Dixon, M.D., UofM 

33 Parsonage St. 

Pittston. Pa. 

Harr>' C. Donahoo, M.D.. UofM 
2428 Edgmont Ave. 
Chester. Pa. 

James Corbin Doughty. M.D., UofM 
Onancock, Va. 

Col. Chauncey E. Dovell, M.D., '14, UofM 
62 S. Boxwood St. 
Hampton. Va. 23369 



John H. Doyle. M.D.. '02. P&S 

775 Somerset Ave. 

North Dighton. Mass. 02764 

Joseph Lee Dowling. M.D.. '15. UofM 

207 Waterman St. 

Providence. R. I. 02906 

Manuel Ducno Y Ducno. M.D.. '05, UofM 

571 West 139th St. 

NewYork, N.Y. 10031 

James Fender Easton. M.D,. "13. P&S 

45 Rosemary Lane 

Romney. West Virginia 

Vivian P. Edwards, M.D.. UofM 

27 Hillside Ave. 

Edwardsville. Kingston, Pa. 

Michael Joseph Egan, Jr.. M.D.. '15. UofM 

618 Maupas Ave. 

Savannah, Ga. 31401 

Samuel E. Enfield, M.D., "13, P&S 

116 South Liberty St. 

Cumberland. Md. 21502 

Wilmer C. Ensor, M.D., '03. BMC 

441 Swallow Dr. 

Miami Springs, Fla. 33166 

Richard Esslinger, M.D., '14, UofM 

3720 Glenmore Ave. 

Baltimore. Md. 21206 

John Evans, M.D., '03. BMC 

321 Regester Ave. 

Baltimore, Md. 21212 

Remo Fabbri, M.D., '09, BMC 

1731 MarkleySt. 

Norristown, Pa. 

Dawson L. Farber. M.D.. '13. BMC 

305 Woodlawn Rd. 

Baltimore, Md. 21210 

Lee K. Fargo, M.D., '15. P&S 

8155 Loch Raven Blvd. 

Baltimore. Md. 21204 

George L. Faucett. M.D.. '03. P&S 

908 Walnut St. 

Gadsden, Ala. 35901 

Lloyd H. Feick. M.D.. UofM 

807 N. 10th St. 

Reading. Pa. 

Israel J. Feinglos. M.D., '16. UofM 

2002 E. Pratt St. 

Baltimore, Md. 21231 



October, 1966 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. UXirERSlTV OF MARVLAXD 



Wm. T. Ferneyhough, M.D.. "16. UofM 
202 >/2 South Scales 
Reidsville, N. C. 27320 

Antonio Fernos-Isern, M.D.. '15. P&S 
1710 New House Office Bldg. 
San Juan, P. R. 

Charles Wm. Finnerty. M.D.. "13, P&S 
440 Broadway 
Somerville, Mass. 02143 

Frank P. Firey, M.D., '10. UofM 

2224 N. E. 46th St. 

Portland. Ore. 97213 

Edward E. Fitzpatrick. M.D.. '15, P&S 

317 36th Ave.. N.E. 

St. Petersburg. Fla. 33704 

Paul N. Fleming, M.D.. '13. UofM 

8627 Fenton St. 

Silver Spring. Md. 20910 

Edgar T. Flint. M.D., "01. BMC 

44 Somerset St. 

Raritan. N. J. 08869 

Ernest F. Flora. M.D., '13, UofM 

Boones Mill. Va. 

Wm. H. Flynn. M.D.. '16. UofM 

126 Main St. 

Bristol, Conn. 06010 

Fred T. Foard. M.D., '16, UofM 

701 Beaver Dam Rd. 

Raleigh. N. C. 27607 

H. M. Foster. M.D.. '10. UofM 

Ilchester Rd. 

EllicottCity,Md. 21043 

Raymond K. Foxwell. M.D., '16, UofM 

4103 N. 4th 

Arlington. Va. 22203 

Ernest Wm. Frey. M.D.. '12. UofM 

1928 Pennsylvania Ave. 

Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Edgar B. Friedenwald. M.D.. "03, P&S 

1701 EutawPl.. Apt. 1-B 

Baltimore, Md. 21217 

James C. Frye. M.D.. '1 1. BMC 
407 First St. 
Williamsburg, Pa. 

Wm. L. Funkhouser. M.D.. "04. UofM 
47 Peachtree Park Rd. 
Atlanta. Ga. 30309 



Charles W. Gardner. M.D., '01, UofM 
49 Toilsome Hill Rd. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 06604 

George W. Gault. M.D.. '10, UofM 
112 Walnut St. 
Harrisburg. Pa. 

W. Frank Gemmill, M.D., '13, UofM 
121 W. Springettsbury Ave. 
York. Pa. 

Dawson Orme George. M.D.. '12, UofM 

Denton, Md. 21629 

Wm. Thos. Gocke. M.D., '11. P&S 

8265 S.W. 150th Dr. 

Miami, Fla. 33156 

Leo Goldbach. M.D., '05. UofM 
212 Stratford Rd. 
Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Albert Goldey. M.D., '12, UofM 

210 W. lOlstSt. 

New York. N. Y. 10025 

Harris Goldman, M.D.. '10, P&S 
3507 Garrison Blvd. 
Baltimore. Md. 21215 

Harry Goldmann, M.D.. '16, UofM 

7121 Pk. Hgts. Ave. 

Baltimore. Md. 21215 

Harry Goldsmith. M.D.. '13. UofM 

3109 Marnat Rd. 

Baltimore. Md. 21208 

Luis Felipe Gonzalez. M.D., '15, P&S 

BoxB 

Rio Grande, P. R. 

Attie Thompson Gordon. M.D.. "14. P&S 

Spencer. W. Va. 25276 

Gustave A. Gorisse, M.D.. '1 1, BMC 

7329 Kings Run Rd. 

Dayton, Ohio 45459 

Don U. Gould. M.D., '05. BMC 

N. Main St. 

Sherburne. N. Y. 13460 

Garland Grazier. M.D., UofM 

Hollsopple, Pa. 

Charles Jacob Greenstein, M.D.. '12. BMC 

300 Main St. 

New Britain. Conn. 06051 

George F. Grisinger. M.D.. '10, P&S 

2861 Piedmont Rd. 

Charleston. W. Va. 



Vol. .^1. X,K 4 



.lI-iMXr .ISSOCIATIOX SBCTIOX 



Julius E. Gross. M.D., "07. UofM 

9576 Collins Ave. 

.Surfside. Fla. 3.M54 

Bowers Hewitt Growt. M.D.. "16. UofM 

.Medical Center 

.Addison. Mich. 49220 

Humphrey W. Gwynn. M.D.. "16. UoI'M 

.■^20 N. Magnolia 

Orlando, pla. 32802 

Glenn G. Haight. M.D.. '10. BMC 

.Audubon. .Minn. 5651 1 

Edward St. C. Hamilton. M.D.. M 1. UofM 

Oak Hill. W. Va. 

Nathan S. Hanellin. M.D.. '1 1. UofM 

152 182nd St. 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 11209 

Cecil Strake Ha.ssell, M.D.. "14. UofM 

2939 S.W. 5th St. 

Miami, Fla. 33135 

Cecil Hassell. M.D.. '14. UofM 

507 E. Carolina Ave. 

Crewe. Va. 

Herman E. Hasseltine, M.D.. "04. UofM 

Bristol. Vt. 05443 

Leonard Hays, M.D., '13, UofM 

5201 Baltimore Ave. 

Hyatisville. Md. 207S1 

John Roy Hege, M.D., '16. UofM 

905 Martin Drive 

Concord. N. C. 28025 

Howard Carrington Heilman. M.D.. UofM 

Elderton. Pa. 

Isidor Heller. M.D.. '13, UofM 

49 Brandon Rd. 

Upper Darby. Pa. 

Frederick H. Herrman, M.D.. '07. UofM 

1710 E. 33rd St. 

Baltimore. Md. 21218 

Arthur Wm. Higgins, M.D.. "07, UofM 

McLain Bldg. 

Wheeling. W. Va. 

Robert B. Hill, M.D., '15. UofM 

Southern Pines, N.C. 

Simon VVickline Hill, M.D.. UofM 

Regent, N. Dakota 

John J. H. Hilton, M.D.. "12. BMC 
336 Haverhill St. 
Lawrence, Mass. 01840 



Isadorc Hirschman, M.D., "11. UofM 
618 11th Ave. 
Huntington, W. Va. 

Henry Hiram Hodgin. M.D.. UofM 
Red Springs. N. C. 

Maxcy Gregg HotTman, M.D.. UofM 
Bunker Hill. \V. Va. 

John F. Hogan. M.D.. '1 1. UofM 

Box 113 

Gibson Island, Md. 21056 

Howard Steele Holloway, M.D.. "03. UofM 
Perryman, Md. 21130 

Francis Hutchinson. M.D.. "11. UofM 
485 E. Howard St. 
Pasadena. Calif. 91104 

Manuel R. Janer, M.D., '12. UofM 
697 West End Ave. 
NewYork, N. Y. 10025 

Leon Peter Jankievvicz. M.D.. "06. BMC 
914 State St. 
Utica. N. Y. 13502 

Harry E. Jenkins. M.D.. '05. UofM 
Farmville, Va. 

Jesse J. Jenkins, M.D.. '14. P&S 
Farmington. W. Va. 26571 

William H. Jenkins. M.D., '15, UofM 
2024 R St.. N.W. 
Washington 9. D. C. 

Frank Leslie Jennings, M.D.. "11. P&S 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Charles Sterling Jernigan, M.D.. '97, BMC 
350 Boulevard, S.E. 
Atlanta, Ga. 

William R. Johnson, M.D.. '15. UofM 
403 Medical Arts Bldg. 
Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Kenneth B. Jones, M.D., '11, UofM 

Church Creek, Md. 21622 

Solomon Chas. Katzoff, M.D.. "04. UofM 

Keystone Realty Co. 

907 Whitelock St.. 1st Floor Apt. 

Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Charles Hutchison Keesor. M.D., '11. UofM 

2302 Chapline St. 

Wheeling. W. Va. 



October, 1966 



WLLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. VNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Col. Lloyd A. Kefauver, M.D., '06, BMC 
665 S. Skinner Blvd. 
St. Louis. Mo. 63105 

Charles Keller, M.D., '98, UofM 
222 W. Monument St. 
Baltimore. Md. 21201 

Roy R. Kerkow. M.D., '15, UofM 

505 Yakima St. 

Wenatchee, Wash. 

George S. M. KiefTer, M.D.. '03, UofM 

1010 Leeds Ave. 

Baltimore. Md. 21229 

George Alfred Kohler, Jr., M.D., '12, P&S 

Smithburg.Md. 21783 

Lawrence B. Kolb, M.D.. '08, UofM 

6645-32nd St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 20015 

Charles Byron Korns, M.D., UofM 

Sipesville, Pa. 

Harry Stanley Kuhlman, M.D., '14, P&S 

Sharptown,Md. 21861 

Julius Jos. Kvatsak, M.D., UofM 

3521 California Ave. 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Anthony W. Lamy. M.D.. "08, P&S 

560 Newark Ave. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 07208 

Alston Howard Lancaster, M.D., '03, P&S 

997 Main St. 

Worcester, Mass. 01603 

Philimon S. Lansdale, M.D., '02, UofM 

100 E. Church St. 

Frederick, Md. 21701 

Wm. E. Van Landingham, M.D.. '05, BMC 

328 Dyer Ave 

West Palm Beach. Fla. 33405 

Herbert Leonard Langer, M.D., '14, P&S 

212 Beach 69th St. 

Far Rockaway, N. Y. 1 1692 

Frank V. Langfitt, M.D., '07, BMC 

227 Carr Ave. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Enrique Laisse y Rivera, M.D.. UofM 
Sabana Grande, P. R. 

Augustin R. Laugier, M.D., '14, P&S 

Box 298 

San Juan, P. R. 00902 



Charles R. Law, Jr., M.D., '1 1. UofM 
Berlin, Md. 21811 

Oram R. Lawry. Sr.. M.D., '11, P&S 

23 Oak St. 

Rockland. Maine 04841 

J. Walter Layman, M.D., '10, BMC 
5 Public Square 
Hagerstown, Md. 21740 

Simon Geilech Lenzner, M.D., '12, UofM 

187 Waterman St. 

Providence 6, R. L 

Letcher E. Trent. M.D., '10. P&S 

209 DeWitt Rd. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 13214 

Morris B. Levin. M.D., '14. UofM 

218 University Pkwy. 

Baltimore, Maryland 21218 

Addison LeRoy Lewis, M.D., UofM 

Havre de Grace, Md. 

Nolan D. C. Lewis, M.D., '14, UofM 

Rt.#5 

Frederick, Md. 21701 

Louis Herbert Limauro, M.D.. '06. UofM 

374 Charles River Rd. 

Watertown. Mass. 

R. Basil Linger, M.D., '15, P&S 

321 W. Main St. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Joseph Lipskey, M.D., '14, P&S 

Odenton ( A. A. Co. ) , Md. 2 1 1 1 3 

Bernard Livingston, M.D., '08, BMC 

535 S. Shore Dr. 

Miami Beach, Fla. 33141 

Thomas P. Lloyd, M.D., "96, BMC 

1030 Highland Ave. 

Shreveport, La. 71101 

Arthur M. Loope, M.D., '98, BMC 

217 Sherbourne Rd. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 13224 

John Robert Lowery, M.D., UofM 
Salisbury, N. C. 

Charles H. Lupton, M.D., '16. UofM 

1430 Meads Rd. 

Norfolk, Va. 23505 

John F. Lutz, M.D.. '14, UofM 

72 Southgate Ave. 

Annapolis. Md. 



]'ol. M. Xo. 4 



.IIAMXI .ISSOCIATIOX SECTIOX 



Clyde C. Mack. M.D.. •04, UofM 

S72 :4th St. 

Winter Haven. Fla, 3.^SSl) 

Isaac M. Macks, M.D.. "I 1. UofM 
3506 Liberty Heights Ave. 
Baltimore. Md. 21215 

A. M. Magarian, M.D., "05. BMC 
330 VV. Ocean Blvd. 
Long Beach. Calif. 90S02 

Charles L. Magruder. M.D.. 'U. UofM 
1010 N. Bundy Drive 
Los Angeles. Calif. 90049 

John E. Maher. M.D.. "14. P&S 

96 Third Ave. 

Long Branch. N. J. 07740 

Vernon L. Mahoncy. NLD.. "15. P&S 
2725 E. Exeter 
Tucson, Ariz. 85716 

-Albert Eugene Mann. ^^D.. T2. UofM 

182-5th St. 

Stamford. Conn. 06904 

Ernesto. Marr. M.D.. T3. UofM 
516 Cathedral St. 
Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Wm. Reginald Marshall. M.D.. "08. BMC 

22 Broad St. 

Lynn. Mass. 01902 

Wm. E. Martin, M.D.. '09, UofM 

Randallstown, Md. 21133 

Wm. T. Martin, M.D., UofM 

605 McDaniels Ave. 

Greenville, S. C. 

Erwin Mayer. M.D.. '14. P&S 

The Esplanade Apts. 

Baltimore. Md. 21217 

Frederick W. A. Mayer, M.D., '03, P&S 

1830 James Ave. 

St. Paul. jMinn. 55105 

John Vincent McAninch. M.D., '14. P&S 

308 W. Lincoln Ave. 

McDonald, Pa. 15057 

Frederick L. McDaniel, M.D.. '13, UofM 

44 Northdown Rd. 

Alexandria. Va. 

Albert D. McFadden. M.D., '14, UofM 

4313 Marble Hall Rd. 

Baltimore, Md. 21218 



Henry Hupp Mclniire. M.D.. '07. BMC 
406 Green St. 
Connellsville. Pa. 15425 

George McLean, M.D.. "16, UofM 
Medical Arts Bldg. 
Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Roscoc Drake McMillan. M.D.. UofM 
Red Springs. N. C. 

C. W. McPhcr.son, M.D.. '10, UofM 
Box 969 

Burlington. N.C. 27216 

John L. Meeker. M.D.. '03. P&S 
6 DeBarry Place 
Summit, New Jersey 07901 

Francis J. Mejias, M.D., "16, UofM 
552 Miramar Ave. 
Santurce. P. R. 00908 

M. I. Mendeloff, M.D., '12. UofM 

Box 921 

Charleston 23, W. Va. 

Harry B. Messmore, M.D., UofM 
Addison. Pa. 

Challice Haydon Metcalfe. M.D., "14, UofM 

Sudlersville, Md. 21668 

Isidore Michel, M.D., '11, UofM 

870-5th Ave. 

NewYork, N. Y. 10021 

Samuel Miller, M.D., '12. BMC 

2807 Arthur St. 

Hollywood. Fla. 33020 

William C. Miller, M.D., UofM 

Gaithersburg, Md. 

David C. Mock. M.D.. '04. P&S 

215CajonSt. 

Redlands, Calif. 92373 

Daniel B. Moffett, M.D., UofM 

1 150 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 

Washington. D. C. 

Alfred N. Moore. M.D.. "03. BMC 

16 Pike St. 

Oakland, 111. 61943 

Emmett A. Moore, M.D., '08, UofM 

Box 247 

Newark, Ohio 

Col. Alfred Mordecai. M.D., "14, UofM 

806 S. Hawthorne Rd. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



October, 1966 



BVLLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXF. VXIJ-ERSITY OF MAKYLAXD 



Charles G. Morgan. M.D., UofM 

156 Santa Barbara St. 

Corpus Christi, Texas 

Samuel J. Morris. M.D., UofM 

205 Kingwood St. 

Morgantown. W. Va. 

Theodore Morrison, M.D., "15. UofM 

Apt. 704 West 

100 W. Cold Spring Lane 

Baltimore, Md. 21210 

C. H. Moses, M.D., UofM 

919 Linden Ave. 

Sharon, Pa. 

Charles L. Mowrer. M.D.. '13. UofM 

159 W.Washington St. 

Hagerstown, Md. 21740 

Leo P. Musser, M.D., "13, UofM 

500 Vine Hill Way 

Martinez, Calif. 94553 

Charles W. Myers. M.D.. '15, UofM 
R.D. IS. Box 256 
Indianapolis, Ind. 46224 
Wm. Edgar Myles, M.D., UofM 
White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 
Victor C. Nah, M.D., '13, UofM 
301 North Van Buren St. 
Wilmington. Dei. 19805 

Walter Irving Nailer. M.D.. '10. BMC 

121 Wickham Ave. 

Middletown, N. Y. 10940 

A. B. Nevling, M.D., '16. UofM 

P. O. Box 558 

Rochester, Minn. 55902 

Benjamin Newhouse, M.D., "12. UofM 

4213 16thSt., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 2001 1 

Walter S. Niblett, M.D., "11, UofM 

1141 Gypsy Lane East 

Baltimore, Md. 21204 

Frank Peter Nicholson, M.D.. '16. UofM 

301 Boston Blvd. 

Sea Girt, N. J. 08750 

Charles Francis Nicol, M.D., '13, P&S 

63 Prospect Pk., W. 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 11215 

Robert H. Noell. M.D., '16. UofM 

207 Academy St. 

Roxboro, N. C. 27573 



Juan J. Nogueras, M.D., "15, P&S 
468 Caribe St. 
Box 1214 
San Juan, P. R. 

Lester D. Norris, M.D., '08, UofM 
Fairmont General Hospital 
Fairmont, W. Va. 26551 

Arthur M. O'Connor. "09. BMC 

39 Academy St. 

Lee, Massachusetts 01238 

Vincent J. Oddo. M.D., '16, UofM 
65 S. Hill Dr. 
Cranston. R. I. 02910 

John Charles O'Neil. M.D.. '14, UofM 
P.O. Box 158 
Savannah, Ga. 31402 

Gonzalo O'Neill, M.D.. '16, UofM 

410 Prospect St. 

East Orange. N. J. 07017 

Walter A. Ostendorf. M.D.. '13, UofM 
420 West Elsmere 
San Antonio 12, Texas 

John Ostro. M.D., '11. UofM 
5234 Dorchester Ave. 
Chicago, III. 60615 

Samuel Watson Page. M.D.. UofM 
Greenwood, S. C. 

Julius G. Paider, M.D., '00, BMC 

405 E. 72nd St. 

New York, N. Y. 10021 

Harold H. Palmer. M.D.. '08. BMC 
36 S. Main St. 
Plymouth. N. M. 03264 

Wm. N. Palmer, M.D., '05, P&S 
P. O. Box 558 

Easton, Md. 21601 

Paul Jones Parker. M.D., UofM 
Hampton, Va. 

James B. Parramore. M.D.. '09. UofM 
523 Whitehead St. 
Key West. Fla. 33040 

Benjamin Parvey. M.D.. '07, BMC 
636 Beacon St. 
Boston, Mass. 02215 

T. E. Patteson, M.D., '09, UofM 
Dillwvn. Va. 



Vol. 51. No. 4 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIOX Sru'TION 



Ernest M. Perry. M.D.. UofM 

1 25 Sunset Ave. 

Rocky Mount. N. C. 

Charles J. Pflueger, M.D.. '05, BMC 

460 S. Ardmore St. 

LosAngelcs. Calif. 90005 

George Henry Ptlucger. M.D.. '06, BMC 

40 Dole Ave. 

Crystal Lake. III. (i0014 

Lawrence D. Phillips. NLD.. "19. UofM 
.i30l Newport Gap Pike 
Wilmington. Del. I9S0S 

W'm. Garfield Phillips. M.D.. UofM 
Skiatook. Okla. 

George Piness. NLD.. "13, UofM 
240 S. LaCienga Blvd. 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 90211 

Linn F. Playse. M.D.. "06. UofM 
4340 Juanita Way. South 
St. Petersburg 5, Fla. 

Walter W. Point. M.D., "H, UofM 
Box 2567 
Charleston 29, W. Va. 

Guy R. Post, M.D., "16. UofM 
11 16 S.Park Dr. 
Fairmont, W. Va. 26554 

John T. H. Powers. M.D.. '10. P&S 
55 West St. 
Leominster. Mass. 01453 

Ivan Emerson Pratt, M.D.. UofM 
Millerton. Pa. 

Wilmer Marshall Priest, M.D.. "09, UofM 
55 West 1 84th St. 
New York 28. N. Y. 

Manuel E. Pujadaz-Diaz. M.D.. "14. P&S 
1611 Colon Ave. 
Santurce. P. R. 00911 

Clayton T. Ralls. M.D.. '04, P&S 

Box 608 

Winfield. Kansas 67156 

Watson S. Rankin. M.D., '01, UofM 
Methodist Home 
Charlotte 5. N. C. 

Moses Raskin. M.D.. '15. UofM 
6221 Greenspring Ave. 
Baltimore 9, Md. 



Edwin R. Raymalcy. M.D., '04, UofM 
1034 .South Ave. 
Pittsburgh 21. Pa. 

Harry Cornelius Raysor. M.D.. '13. Uof.M 
St. Matthews. S. C. 

Robert P. Reagan, M.D.. 08. BMC 

345 Goundry St. 

North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Ralph G. Reed. M.D., '08. BMC 

330 Elmore St. 

Central Islip. N. Y. 11722 

Charles A. Reifschneider. M.D.. '16, UofM 
104W. Madison St. 
Baltimore, Md. 20101 

Col. Walter L. Richards, M.D., '14, UofM 
Box 1 1, Route 4 
Charlottesville, Va. 

Capt. Willard J. Riddick, M.D., '05. UofM 
7426 Dominican St. 
New Orleans, La. 70118 

Harry Young Righton, M.D., '07, UofM 
401 E. 45th St. 
Savannah, Ga. 31405 

John Wm. Robertson, M.D., '09, UofM 
Onancock, Va. 

Jacob Roemer, M.D.. '06, BMC 
365 S. Westgate Ave. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 90049 

Joseph U. Rohr. M.D.. '14, P&S 
3705 Bohan St., N.E. 
Roanoke, Va. 24012 

George Rosenbaum, M.D., '05, UofM 
1030 Rock Creek Drive 
Wyncote, Pa. 

George Rosenbaum, M.D., '05. BMC 
7608 Coventry Ave. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 19126 

Jacob L. Rosenstein, M.D., '05, P&S 
568 Bergen Ave. 
Jersey City, N. J. 07304 

Paul Arndt Rothfuss, M.D., '23, UofM 
1032 Rural Ave. 
Williamsport, Pa. 17701 

Wm. T. Ruark, M.D., '15. UofM 
Pinecrest Sanatorium 
Beckley. W. Va. 25801 



October, 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. UXH-EKSITV OF MARVLAXD 



Louis Rubin, M.D.. '10, UofM 
10510 Euclid Ave. 
Cleveland 6, Ohio 

John G. Runkel, M.D., '10. UofM 

715 Charing Cross Rd. 

Baltimore, Md. 21229 

Francis F. Ruzicka, M.D., '16, UofM 

800 N. Patterson Park Ave. 

Baltimore. Md. 21224 

Raymond Harrison Ryder, M.D.. "13, UofM 

48 Central Ave. 

Waterbury, Conn. 06702 

Lucius C. Sanders, M.D., '15, UofM 

20 S. Dudley St. 

Memphis, Tenn. 38103 

Harry Schniick, M.D.. '15, UofM 

1203 San Diegiato St. 

Encinitas, Calif. 92024 

Leonard O. Schwartz. M.D., '12, P&S 

3421 Pennsylvania Ave. 

Weirton, W. Va. 

William H. Scruggs, M.D., "13, UofM 
Andrews, N. C. 

George H. Seaks, M.D., '04, UofM 

New O.xford, Pa. 

Elias C. Segarra, M.D., '13. P&S 

1803 Ponce de Leon Ave. 

Santurce, P. R. 00929 

Herman Seidel, M.D., '10, P&S 

2404 Eutaw Place 

Bahimore, Md. 21217 

Roger K. Sell, M.D., '13, BMC 

Torrington, Wyoming 82240 

Charles L Shaffer, M.D., "07, BMC 

725 East Main St. 

Somerset, Pa. 

Maurice E. Shamer, M.D., '10, UofM 

3300 West North Ave. 

Baltimore, Md. 21216 

Albert C. Shannon, M.D.. '12, P&S 

R. D. 1, Box 83 

Mayport, Pa. 16240 

J. D. Sharp. M.D., '12, UofM 

Box 849, Shifting Shadows 

Twenty-Nine Palms, Calif. 92277 

Arthur A. Shawkey, M.D., '00, P&S 

207 Beauregard St. 

Charleston 1, W. Va. 



Richard O. Shea, M.D., '14, P&S 
25 Sanford Place 
Bridgeport, Conn. 06604 

Frank E. Shipley, M.D., '15, UofM 
Savage, Md. 

Ivy G. Shirkey, M.D., "14, P&S 
Albemarle Apts. 
1830 17thSt., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20009 

Wilbur F. Shirkey, Jr., M.D., '16, UofM 
Riverview Terrace, Apt. 501 
Charleston, W. Va. 

David Silberman, M.D., '12, UofM 
#508 Temple Garden Apts. 
2601 Madison Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Albert George Singewald, M.D., '02, UofM 
1613 E. North Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 21213 

John Andrew Skladowsky, M.D. '12. UofM 
Box 181, Route #1 
Severna Park, Md. 21 146 

Henry Oscar Sloane, M.D.. "OS. BMC 
23 S. Hillside Ave. 
Ventnor, N. J. 08406 

Arthur Charles Smith. M.D., "10. P&S 

90 Deer Hill Ave. 

Danbury, Conn. 06810 

Earl H. Snavely, M.D., '05, BMC 

4800 San Amaro 

Coral Gables, Fla. 33146 

Frederick Snyder, M.D., '08, UofM 
44 Clinton Ave. 
Kingston. N. Y. 12401 

Edward Wharton Sprague, M.D.. "03. P&S 
86 Washington St. 
Newark, N. J. 07102 

Dallas C. Speas, M.D., "11, UofM 

2598 Reynolds Rd. 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Hugh R. Spencer. M.D.. "10. UofM 

3900 N. Charles St. 

Baltimore, Md. 21218 

Clarke J. Stallworth, M.D.. '12. UofM 

Thomaston. Ala. 36783 

Fred E. Steele. Jr., M.D.. "07, UofM 

Florence. Mass. 



I'ol. .■I'i, No. 7 



ALU MX I ASSOCIATION SECTION 



I'aiil Beadle Steele, M.D.. "15. P&S 
7059 Jenkins Arcade 
I'itisbiirgh, Pa. 15222 

Harold Milton Stein, M.D.. "16. UofM 

227 \V. Broadway 
Paterson, N. J. 07522 

Jacob J. Stcinfelder. M.D., 'OS. BMC 
924 West End Ave. 
New York. N.Y. 10025 

Thomas \Vm. Stevenson. M.D., 'OS, P&S 
4421 Montaire Ave. 
Long Beach, Calif. 9080S 

George L. Stickney. M.D.. "10, UofM 
104 West University Pkwy. 
Baltimore. Md. 21210 

Frank Gregory Strahan. M.D.. "14, UofM 
Williamsville. Vt, 

George L. Straiib. M.D.. T 1. UofM 
4117 Anderson Rd. 
CoralGables.Fla. 33146 

Charles Franklin Strosnider. M.D., "09, 

UofM 
P. O. Box 550 
Goldsboro. N. C. 27530 

B. F. Tefft. M.D.. •05, UofM 
1 85 Washington St. 
West Warwick. R. I. 

Bernard Oscar Thomas. Sr., M.D., '06, 
UofM 

228 N. Market St. 
Frederick, Md. 21701 

John M. Thorup, M.D., '15, P&S 
4927 N. E. 30th Ave. 
Portland. Oregon 97211 

Homer U. Todd. M.D.. '08. UofM 
2108 St. Paul St. 
Baltimore. Md. 21218 

Grafton Dent Townshend. M.D., '1 1, UofM 
1141 Roscomore Rd. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 90024 

William J. Trainor, M.D.. '03. BMC 
326 Virginia Circle 
Wilmington, Ohio 

Richard Trevaskis. Sr,. M.D.. '11. UofM 
220 Baltimore Ave. 
Cumberland, Md. 21502 



William H. Triplet!, M.D.. '11, BMC 
1038 Lakemont Rd. 
Baltimore. Md. 21228 

Karl H. Trippett. M.D.. '11. P&S 
Grafton. W. Va. 

Jesse R. Tiickwiller. M.D.. '10, P&S 
223 Monroe St. 
Fairmont, W. Va. 

Alfred Ullman. M.D., '02, P&S 
1702 Eutaw Place 
Baltimore. Md. 21217 

Carl M. Van Poole, M.D., '16, UofM 
Mt. Airy. Md. 21771 

Wm. Lawrence Van Sant. M.D., '10. UofM 
Hinton. W. Va. 

Thurman Elroy Vass. M.D., '14, P&S 

Box 167 

Bluefield, W. Va. 24701 

Frederick J. Waas, M.D.. '05, UofM 
1804 Mayview Rd. 
Jacksonville, Fia. 32210 

Joseph Judson Waff, M.D., '15, UofM 
Box 235 
Shenandoah, Va. 

Adam C. Walkup. M.D., '09, UofM 

33 Water St. 

St. Augustine, Fla. 32084 

Wm. Benjamin Warthen, M.D., '05, UofM 
Davisboro, Ga. 31018 

Earl B. Weible, M.D., '10, BMC 
Abercrombie, N. Dakota 

Meyer A. Weinberg. M.D., '04, UofM 
1724 Eutaw Place 
Baltimore, Md. 21217 

Maurice C. Wentz, M.D., '16, UofM 

455 W. Market St. 

York. Pa. 17404 

Parker M. Wentz, M.D., '06, P&S 

752 Kelly Drive 

York, Pa. 

Cleveland D. Whelchel, M.D., '13, UofM 

1735 Riverside Drive 

Gainesville, Ga. 30501 

Edwin Vignes Whitaker, M.D.. '12. UofM 

Box 625 

Baton Rouge, La. 70821 



October. 1966 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICLXE. UNirERSITV OF MARYLAXD 



Col. Wm. A. Wickline. M.D., "95, P&S 
232 Rutherford Drive 
Danville, Calif. 94526 

Java C. Wilkins. M.D., '1 1 , UofM 

Box 446 

Haw River, N. C. 2752S 

David T. Williams, M.D., "14, UofM 
21 Hall Ave. 
Newark, Ohio 

Louis V. Williams. M.D.. '11. P&S 
Route 7 
York, Pa. 

Mayes B. Williams, M.D., "12, P&S 
2000 Eoff St. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

Wm. Frederick Williams, M.D., '16. UofM 
122 S. Center St. 
Cumberland, Md. 21502 

Ernest L. Wilson, M.D., ' 11 , BMC 

10509 Stone Ave. 
Seattle 33, Wash. 

Walter Michael Winters, M.D., "10, UofM 
288 Broadway 
Paterson, N. J. 07501 



Francis R. Wise, M.D., '08, P&S 
129 E. Market St. 
York, Pa. 17401 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., '06, P&S 

1120 St. Paul St. 

Baltimore, Md. 21202 

John I. Wiseman, M.D., "07. P&S 

215 Annie St. 

Orlando, Fla. 32806 

Eugene Bascom Wright, M. D., "09, UofM 

340 Buckhannon Ave. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 26301 

Silas G. Wright, M.D., '04, UofM 

Shawboro. N. C. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., "14, UofM 

Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore, Md. 21201 

Eugene Zeller, "15, UofM 

2739 Eastern Ave. 

Baltimore 24, Md. 

Mark V. Ziegler, M.D., "15, UofM 

OIney, Md. 20832 

W. F. Zinn, M.D., "11, P&S 

400 Coral Way 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33301 



I'ol. .^;, No. 4 



(^lass 



NOTES 



}■()((/• acliici'cuicnts. jcUo',^' aliiiiniii.s. 
arc of interest to your classmates. They 
constitute a rezvard to the faculty, are a 
chaltc)u/c to the younger physicians, and 
arc an item of prestige for the Univer- 
sity. Please cooperate with us by for- 
warding news of yourself or any alumnus 
to the BuLLETix. Thank you. 

CLASS OF 1911 

Dr. G. D. Townshend has moved from 
his former residence to the Shangrila Apart- 
ments, 1301 Ocean Avenue, Santa Monica, 
California. 

CL.\SS OF 1926 

Dr. Bernard J. Cohen has announced the 
association of Dr. Alan B. Cohen in the 
practice of internal medicine with offices at 
the Mar>lander Apartments, 3501 St. Paul 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 

CLASS OF 1927 

Dr. E. Eugene Covington was recently ap- 
pointed Senior Radiotherapist at the Me- 
morial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in 
New York City. Dr. Covington will also 
join the Faculty of the Medical School of 
Cornell University. 

CLASS OF 1928 

Dr. A. A. Silver has announced the as- 
sociation of Dr. Harvey S. Feuerman of the 
Class of 1962 for the practice of diabetes 
mellitus and internal medicine. Dr. Silver 
has offices at 2601 Madison Avenue, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

CLASS OF 1929 

Dr. Jacob H. Conn has been elected North 
American Vice President in the Section of 
Clinical Hypnosis of the Pan Ameriean 
Medical Association. 



CLASS OF lli.il 

Dr. W'illiani M. Seabold hus announced 
ihc opening ol his ollicc lor the practice of 
adolescent medicine al 134 West I.anvale 
Street in Baltimore. 

CLASS OF 19.33 

Dr. Stephen Sewell of 410 Essex Avenue, 
Spring Lake, N. J., has retired as chief of 
the gastroenterology section of the Veterans 
Administration Hospital at Lyons, New 
Jersey. Dr. Sewell will continue to live in 
Spring Lake, New Jersey where he was 
previously engaged in private practice and 
where he has his permanent home. Dr. 
Sewell will spend the winters in Florida 
where he has a home on Majoca Island. 

CLASS OF 1936 

Dr. Milton H. Stapen, president of the 
Williamsburgh General and Hampstead 
General Hospitals in New York, was 
recently appointed a consultant to the United 
States Government on "Medicare" for 
hospital based specialists. 

Dr. Stapen also served as a member of 
New York's Associated Hospital Service 
"Blue Cross" and is a member of the Long 
Island Hospital Planning Council. He 
recently resigned a civil service position as 
radiologist to the City of New York after 
more than twelve years of service; however, 
he remains an active member of the faculty 
of the Down State Medical School. 

Dr. Harry C. Bowie has announced the 
association of Dr. David R. Will of the Class 
of 1943 in the practice of general surgery 
and with offices at 926 St. Paul Street in 
Baltimore. 

CLASS OF 1937 

Dr. Samuel Jackson of Valley Stream, 
Long Island, has been elected president of 
the medical staff of the South Nassau Com- 
munities Hospital. Dr. Jackson took office 
for a period of two years beginning July 1. 

A former secretary and vice-president of 
the hospital's medical staff, he is also past 



October, 1966 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. iWII-ERSITV OF MARVLJXD 



president of the Nassau County Academy of 
General Practice, a member of the Congress 
of Delegates of the New York State 
Academy of General Practice and a con- 
sultant to the Psychiatric Faculty of the 
Nassau Academy of Medicine. 

CLASS OF 1938 

Dr. Samuel Novey has been appointed to 
the full time staff of the Sheppard and Enoch 
Pratt Hospital. Dr. Novey will serve as 
Director of Training. In announcing his 
appointment, the hospital stated: "Dr. Novey 
comes to Sheppard Pratt with a background 
of some twenty-six years in psychiatry. 
Throughout his professional career he has 
been actively engaged in teaching. He is a 
Training and Supervising Analyst in the 
Baltimore Psychoanalytic Institute and an 
Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the 
Johns Hopkins University School of Medi- 
cine. Dr. Novey is well known for his many 
contributions to the scientific literature of 
psychiatry and psychoanalysis." 

Dr. Samuel Louis Fox has announced the 
opening of his suburban office in the Pikes- 
ville Professional Building, 7 Church Lane, 
with his practice limited to ophthalmology. 

CLASS OF 1942 

Dr. Luis O. J. Manganiello of 1467 Harper 
Street, Augusta, Georgia, has been named 
a member of the State Board of Medical 
Examiners of the State of Georgia. The 
appointment was recently made by Gov. 
Carl E. Sanders. Dr. Manganiello received 
his training in neurosurgery at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland under the late Dr. 
Charles Bagley and has since been active 
in the practice of this specialty in Augusta, 
Georgia. He is the author of numerous 
scientific contributions in the field of neuro- 
surgery and to basic neurology. 

CLASS OF 194.3 

Dr. Harry Cohen has been promoted to 
assistant professor in the department of 



obstetrics of the School of Medicine. Dr. 
Cohen is also president of the Physician's 
Club of Baltimore of Plii Delia Epsilon 
Medical Fraternity. 

Dr. R. Louis Sapareto has announced the 
opening of his office for the practice of 
otolaryngology at 122 Enoza Avenue, Haver- 
hill. Massachusetts. 

Dr. David R, Will has announced his as- 
sociation in the practice of general surgery 
with Dr. Harry C. Bowie with offices at 926 
St. Paul Street in Baltimore. 



CLASS OF 1945 

Dr. Frank J. Ayd, Jr. has organized and 
begun publication of a new periodical en- 
titled International Drug Therapy News- 
letter. The Newsletter, to be published 
monthly, is described as a concise, compre- 
hensive coverage of important clinical and 
research information on psychoactive drugs 
and other medicine which act on the central 
nervous system gathered from clinicians, re- 
search investigators, hospitals, clinics and 
the world's medical literature. Dr. Ayd 
will serve as editor of the Newsletter. 

Dr. Ayd, recently returned from a two 
year residence in Italy, is offering the 
journal at a yearly subscription price of 
$7.00 with a rate of $4.00 for residents. 
Publication and subscription offices are lo- 
cated at 912 West Lake avenue, Baltimore, 
Md. 

CLASS OF 1947 

Dr. George Winokur has been promoted 
to Professor of Psychiatry at the Washington 
University School of Medicine in St. Louis. 
Dr. Winokur has been a member of the 
Washington University Faculty since 1951. 

CLASS OF 1948 

Dr. H. Patterson Mack has joined the 
Mead Johnson Research Center in Evans- 
ville, Indiana, where he will serve as an 
Associate Director of Clinical Research. 



;■,./. .^7. .V,.. V 



.ILL MM .ISSOCIATIOX SECTION 



Mack. M.l). 



In an announcement released b\ Dr. 
lichard T. Arnold, president of the research 
enter, he said Dr. Mack will concern him- 
jelf chiefly with the development of clinical 
jesearch programs for the company. 

Before joining Mead Johnson, Dr. Mack 
lerved as senior clinical pharmacologist at 
Ihe Sterling-Winthrop Research Institute in 
liensselaer. New York. Prior to that, from 
I960 to 1964, he was engaged in research 
t the Christ Hospital Institute of Medical 
Research in Cincinnati where he headed the 
oxicology and pathology section. At this 
lime, he also served as lecturer in anatomy 
't the University of Cincinnati. From 1950 
\o 1960, Dr. Mack was associated with the 
Jniversity of Maryland following his gradu- 
jtion in the Class of 1948. He served first 
is an intern at the University Hospital and 
■hen a period of time in the Department 
;if Pathology and Anatomy working under 
|he direction of Dr. Frank H. J. Figge. Dr. 
.'lack received his preliminary education at 
iutgers University and Washington Uni- 
ersity in St. Louis before coming to the 
Jniversity of Maryland. 

Dr. Roger S. Waterman has announced 
he removal of his office to 8306 Liberty 
load, Baltimore, for the practice of psy- 
•rhiatry. 

CLASS OF 1950 

Dr. Wilbert H. McElvain (Colonel), M.C., 
J. S. A. F.. has been recently named Com- 
nander of the 12th U. S. Air Force Hospital 
it Cam Ranh Bay, Viet Nam. Prior to this 
ippointment. Dr. McElvain served with 
4eadquarters. Aerospace Medical Division 
)f Brooks Air Force Base, Texas. 

:>cfobcr, 1966 




I'ol. Wilberl H. McElv 
M.C.. l^S.A.F. 



A combat pilot during World War II and 
a native of Grove City. Pennsylvania, Dr. 
McElvain is also holder of a Master of 
Public Health Degree (MPH) in 1960 from 
the University of California at Berkeley. 

CLASS OF 1951 

Dr. Leonard M. Lister has announced the 
removal of his office to Park Towers East. 
7111 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

CLASS OF 1956 

Dr. C. Herschel King, who has until 
recently held the post of Assistant Professor 
of Anesthesiology at the Duke University 
Medical Center, has accepted an appoint- 
ment on the Staff of the Memorial Hospital, 
Cumberland, Maryland. 

CLASS OF 1959 

Dr. John F. Cadden, Jr. of New York 
City has been appointed assistant director 
of the medical department of the National 
Foundation-March of Dimes. 

Before accepting his new post. Dr. Cadden 
was consultant in maternal and child health 
to the Prince Georges (Maryland) County 
Health Department. Following his gradu- 
ation from the School of Medicine, he was 
intern and then resident in pediatrics at the 
University Hospital. During 1962-65 he 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. UNH-ERSITY OF MARYLAND 




John F. Cadde 



served as resident in public health and 
preventive medicine at the Johns Hopkins 
School of Hygiene and Public Health, being 
awarded the master of public health degree 
in 1965. 

In his assignment with the National 
Foundation, Dr. Cadden will be active in 
the administration of medical programs in- 
cluding nearly seventy March of Dimes 
birth defect treatment centers across the 
nation. 

Dr. August Daniel King, Jr. of 1202 St. 
Paul Street, Baltimore, Md., has been 
recently certified by the American Board 
of Surgery. Dr. King has opened his office 
for the practice of general surgery at 1202 
St. Paul Street and at 204 E. Joppa Road 
in Towson, Md. 

CLASS OF 1960 

Dr. Michael J. Fellner of 562 First avenue. 
New York City, was recently certified as a 
specialist in dermatology by the American 
Board of Dermatology at the New York 
University School of Medicine. 

Dr. Morton E. Smith has been recently 
named Instructor in Ophthalmology in the 
Department of Ophthalmology of the Wash- 
ington University School of Medicine in 
St. Louis. Dr. Smith recently completed a 
year as Chief Resident and as National 
Institute of Neurologic Diseases and Blind- 
ness Fellow in Ophthalmology, the fellow- 
ship being served at the Washington Uni- 
versity School of Medicine. 

During the calendar year of 1964, Dr. 
Smith served as Fellow in Ophthalmic Path- 
ology at the Armed Forces Institute of Path- 



ology in Washington, D. C. His present 
duties include supervision of the Ophthalmic 
Pathology Laboratory at the Washington 
University School of Medicine. 

CLASS OF 1961 

Dr. Robert A. Fink, having completed a 
residency in neurological surgery at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, has been appointed 
Fellow in Neurosurgery at the Donner Radi 
ation Laboratory, University of California in 
Berkeley. 

Dr. Larry G. Tilley has announced the 
opening of his office for the practice ot 
medicine and pediatrics in the Oakleigh 
Professional Building. 1713 Taylor Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 

CLASS OF 1962 

Dr. Harvey S. Feuerman has announcet 
the opening of his office in association wtil 
Dr. A. A. Silver at the Temple Garden 
Apartment 2601 Madison Avenue, Balti 
more, Maryland. Dr. Feuerman will limi 
his practice to diabetes mellitus and in 
ternal medicine. 

Dr. Ronald L. Klimes has assumed hi 
duties as the new Medical Director of th 
Pleasant Acres Home and Hospital. Di 
Klimes succeeds Dr. Margaret E. Croftoi 
who resigned. Dr. Klimes, a native of Bait 
more, said he decided to move to York aftc 
he served his internship at the York Hospitu 
He received his undergraduate training : 
the Johns Hopkins University and h 
medical degree was obtained at the Un 
versify of Maryland. 

CLASS OF 1963 

Dr. Thomas V. Inglesby is current 
stationed at the United States Naval Hospit 
at Bethesda, Md. 

Dr. Richard B. Kennan is currently ser 
ing as a flight surgeon with the U. S. Na\ 
Dr. Kennan may be reached at 265 Beei 
Street. Laurel, South Carolina. 

Vol. .ii. No 



MARYLAND ROOWl 



k